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Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

Khomkaew S.,Srinakharinwirot UniversityNakhon Nayok | Bunyawanihakul P.,Srinakharinwirot UniversityNakhon Nayok | Chaorakam I.,Kasetsart UniversityNakhon Pathom
Journal of the International Society for Southeast Asian Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2016

This paper attempts to demonstratethe performance of a sugarcane planter at the Agricultural Machinery Center, Kasetsart University Research from April 2014 to March 2015 with minimum tillage resulting from a slippery sliding rate (slip %), drawbar pull, drawbar power and PTO power as varied by the different densities of residues at 0, 2, 4, and 6 ton/ha and 2 depth levels of soil at 10 cm and 20 cm. The test was done over one and two rounds in the crop field, after the final sugarcane harvesting, with a moisture content of 22.115% (bulk density) and 19.202 % (bulk density). It was discovered that the fuel consumption rate of the sugarcane planter was at125 m/l at a tractor velocity of 3.2616 km/hr, the slippery sliding rate at 4.44 %, the draft (pulling) of lower link and top link at 8.30 kW, PTO power at 16.56 kW. The performance and total power of the sugarcane planter with minimum tillage resulted from the depth level of the soil opener and the different densities of the sugar cane leaf residues at 0 2 4 and 6 ton/ha and depth level of the soil to affect performance of the sugarcane planter. Therefore, the angle of subsoil opener should be reduced to less than 31 degrees to reduce the effect of soil resistance. © 2016, International Society for Southeast Asian Agricultural Sciences. All Rights Reserved. Source


Takahashi Y.,Japan National Institute of Agrobiological Science | Iseki K.,Japan National Institute of Agrobiological Science | Kitazawa K.,University of Tokyo | Muto C.,Japan National Institute of Agrobiological Science | And 4 more authors.
Frontiers in Plant Science | Year: 2015

Genus Vigna comprise several domesticated species including cowpea and mungbean, and diverse wild species. We found an introgressive hybrid population derived from two wild species, Vigna umbellata and Vigna exilis, in Ratchaburi district, Thailand. The hybrid was morphologically similar to V. umbellata but habituated in a limestone rock mountain, which is usually dominated by V exilis. Analyzing simple sequence repeat loci indicated the hybrid has undergone at least one round of backcross by V. umbellata. We found the hybrid acquired vigorous growth from V. umbellata and drought tolerance plus early flowering from V exilis, and thus has taken over some habitats of V. exilis in limestone karsts. Given the wide crossability of V. umbellata, the hybrid can be a valuable genetic resource to improve drought tolerance of some domesticated species. © 2015 Takahashi, Iseki, Kitazawa, Muto, Somta, Irie, Naito and Tomooka. Source


Naritoom C.,Kasetsart UniversityNakhon Pathom
Journal of the International Society for Southeast Asian Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2015

Blunt-headed burrowing frog (BhBF) (Glyphoglossus molossus) is currently a species at risk of extinction because people catch them for food and also sell them in the marketplace for profit. The objectives of this study were to investigate BhBF nature and to develop the raising method of BhBF in sustainable agricultural system. The experiments were conducted in 2 areas of naturally ecological system; Area 1) Nong Thaag Laan village no. 5, Huay Mon Thong sub-district and Area 2) Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen Campus (KU KPS). Both areas are located in Kamphaeng Saen district, Nakhon Pathom province, Thailand and the experiments were conducted from May 2012 to June 2014. The BhBF breeding trial started with the tadpoles aged 5 days and continued to the age of 20 days which was carried out in 80-cm diameter cement ponds. The density rate of 1,200 tadpoles/pond gave the highest growth with the average length of 2.79 cm. It is not significantly different from the density rate of 1,500 tadpoles/pond (average length of 2.63 cm) but significantly different from the density rates of 1,800 (average length of 2.34 cm) and 2,100 tadpoles/pond (average length of 2.38 cm). No difference in the tadpole length was found between the density rates of 1,800 and 2,100 tadpoles/pond. The tadpole in the density rate of 1,200 tadpoles/pond condition weighed the heaviest (7.61 g) and was significantly different from the tadpoles in other conditions, the density rates of 1,500 (6.25 g), 1,800 (4.71 g) and 2,100 tadpoles/pond (5.60 g), at p<0.0001. No difference in tadpole weight was found between the groups with the density rate of 1,800 (4.71 g) and 2,100 tadpoles/pond (5.60 g). The highest survival rate of BhBF tadpoles was observed in the density rate of 1,800 tadpoles/pond condition and the survival rate is significantly higher than other conditions at p<0.0012. The length of BhBFs from the density rates of 1,200 and 1,500 tadpoles/pond were different from the length of BhBF at the density rates of 1,800 and 2,100 tadpoles/pond. Even though the breeding of BhBFs with the lowest density rate gave the highest lengths and weights, it had the lowest survival rate, hence, it was not recommended. In the Area 1, farmers could catch BhBFs up to 1.5 kg (about 20-30 BhBFs) after one year. In the Area 2, the researcher found that about 20-30 BhBFs had mated and spawned their eggs in a pond 1 year later. © 2015 International Society for Southeast Asian Agricultural Sciences. All rights reserved. Source


Sunpapao A.,Prince of Songkla University | Pitaloka M.K.,Prince of Songkla University | Arikit S.,Kasetsart UniversityNakhon Pathom | Arikit S.,National Science and Technology Development Agency
Biodiversitas | Year: 2016

Algal leaf spot disease of Nephelium lappaceum (rambutan) was observed in southern Thailand. The algae were isolated on Bold’s basal medium (BBM) and identified based on appearance of the lesions, algal morphology and molecular properties. Characteristics of the filamentous thallus cells, sporangiophores, sporangia, gametes and zoospores were clarified. A portion of the 18S small subunit rRNA was amplified to validate the morphological identification by sequence similarity. To summarize the main results, the plant parasite causing algal leaf spot was identified as Cephaleuros virescens, and in sequencing-based phylogenetic analysis the Cephaleuros PSU-R5.1 isolate from rambutan grouped with the algae in genus Cephaleuros. This confirms C. virescens as a causal organism of algal leaf spot disease on rambutan in southern Thailand. © 2016, Society for Indonesian Biodiversity. All rights reserved. Source


Laksana C.,Kasetsart University | Chanprame S.,Kasetsart University | Chanprame S.,Kasetsart UniversityNakhon Pathom
Journal of the International Society for Southeast Asian Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2015

Oil palm leaves are rich in phenolic compounds, polysaccharides and secondary metabolites. These compounds cause difficulty when high quality RNA isolation for gene expression analysis is required. In an attempt to rapidly isolate high-quality RNA from young and mature oil palm leaf, we compared various protocols: the standard protocol, modified protocols, and RNA extraction kits. Our modified protocol has proven to be far better than said protocols for isolating RNA from both types of leaf. This modified method can reduce time, the whole process can be completed within 1.5 h. RNA analyzed spectrophotometrically showed high purity (A260/280=1.9) and high concentration (2,877 ng/ul). Electrophoresis analysis on denaturing formaldehyde agarose gels confirmed the presence of high integrity RNA containing multiple ribosomal bands. Using the extracted RNA, as a template, a fragment of the Actin and BOR genes were successfully amplified by RT-PCR. A cDNA library was also successfully constructed, using extracted RNA as a template. The extracted RNA, using our modified protocol, could be kept at -80oC for at least 24 months without degradation. This indicates that the modified protocol is suitable for RNA isolation from young and mature oil palm leaf and also for further applications. © 2015, International Society for Southeast Asian Agricultural Sciences. All rights reserved. Source

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