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Pieber K.,Medical University of Vienna | Herceg M.,Medical University of Vienna | Quittan M.,Karl Landsteiner Institute of Remobilisation and Functional Health | Csapo R.,Medical University of Vienna | And 2 more authors.
European Spine Journal | Year: 2014

Purpose: This longitudinal study investigated long-term effects of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program consisting of resistance and sensorimotor training, patient education, and stress management over 6 months in patients with chronic low back pain. Methods: Ninety-six patients with chronic recurrent low back pain performed a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. We assessed pain-free lumbar spine range of motion (ROM), strength of the lumbar extensor muscles, and pain by visual analog scale (VAS). Furthermore, the Roland-Morris (RM) questionnaire and SF-36 were used. The examinations were performed before and after rehabilitation, and a long-term follow-up was performed after 18 months. Results: All outcome measurements (ROM, VAS, RM, muscle strength, and SF-36 scores) improved significantly from baseline to the post-rehabilitation evaluation. These improvements were found to persist until a follow-up evaluation 18 months after cessation of the intervention. Conclusions: Our findings confirm the results of former studies evaluating the short-term effects of multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. In addition, our data demonstrate that well-balanced outpatient rehabilitation programs may induce persistent improvements in muscle strength, pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

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