Karamay Municipal Peoples Hospital

Xinjiang, China

Karamay Municipal Peoples Hospital

Xinjiang, China
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Sun W.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Shi L.,Affiliated Hospital of Guiyang Medical College | Ye Z.,U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention | Mu Y.,Chinese People's Liberation Army | And 39 more authors.
Obesity | Year: 2016

Objective To clarify the quantitative relationship of body mass index (BMI) change from early adulthood to midlife with presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after midlife. Methods This study included 120,666 middle-aged and elderly, whose retrospectively self-reported body weight at 20 and 40 years and measured height were available. BMI at 20 and 40 years and BMI change in between were defined as early-adulthood BMI, midlife BMI, and early-adulthood BMI change. Results The odds ratio (OR) for T2DM associated with an 1-unit increment of early-adulthood or midlife BMI was 1.08 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.08) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.09-1.10) respectively. In the cross-tabulation of both early-adulthood BMI and BMI change, the prevalence of T2DM increased across both variables. Compared with participants with normal early-adulthood weight and BMI increase/decrease ≤1, the OR (95% CI) for T2DM of participants with early-adulthood overweight/obesity and BMI increase ≥4 kg/m2 was 3.49 (3.05-4.00). For participants with early-adulthood underweight and BMI increase/decrease ≤ 1, the OR (95% CI) was 0.85 (0.75-0.97). Subgroup analysis according to sex and age showed similar trends. Conclusions Early-adulthood BMI may influence T2DM prevalence after midlife independent of current BMI. T2DM prevalence after midlife was positively associated with early-adulthood weight gain and inversely related to early-adulthood weight loss, while early-adulthood weight loss could not completely negate the adverse effect of early-adulthood overweight/obesity on diabetes. © 2016 The Obesity Society.


PubMed | University of Houston, Karamay Municipal Peoples Hospital, U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University and 19 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of diabetes | Year: 2016

Diagnosed diabetes has been associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the association between non-diabetic hyperglycemia and CKD remained uncertain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between different glycemic status and CKD in Chinese adults and to assess the prevalence and control of diabetes among individuals with CKD.In all, 250752 adults aged 40years were selected from the baseline cohort of the Risk Evaluation of cAncers in Chinese diabeTic Individuals: a lONgitudinal (REACTION) study. Plasma glucose concentrations and biochemical and other clinical data were collected; CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60mL/min per 1.73mThe prevalence of CKD increased gradually with deterioration of glucose metabolic status in both men and women ( P Prediabetes and diabetes were associated with an increased risk of CKD in Chinese men. Control of diabetes among Chinese CKD patients is far from optimal.


PubMed | University of Houston, Karamay Municipal Peoples Hospital, U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University and 19 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) | Year: 2016

To clarify the quantitative relationship of body mass index (BMI) change from early adulthood to midlife with presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after midlife.This study included 120,666 middle-aged and elderly, whose retrospectively self-reported body weight at 20 and 40 years and measured height were available. BMI at 20 and 40 years and BMI change in between were defined as early-adulthood BMI, midlife BMI, and early-adulthood BMI change.The odds ratio (OR) for T2DM associated with an 1-unit increment of early-adulthood or midlife BMI was 1.08 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.08) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.09-1.10) respectively. In the cross-tabulation of both early-adulthood BMI and BMI change, the prevalence of T2DM increased across both variables. Compared with participants with normal early-adulthood weight and BMI increase/decrease 1, the OR (95% CI) for T2DM of participants with early-adulthood overweight/obesity and BMI increase 4 kg/m(2) was 3.49 (3.05-4.00). For participants with early-adulthood underweight and BMI increase/decrease 1, the OR (95% CI) was 0.85 (0.75-0.97). Subgroup analysis according to sex and age showed similar trends.Early-adulthood BMI may influence T2DM prevalence after midlife independent of current BMI. T2DM prevalence after midlife was positively associated with early-adulthood weight gain and inversely related to early-adulthood weight loss, while early-adulthood weight loss could not completely negate the adverse effect of early-adulthood overweight/obesity on diabetes.


PubMed | University of Houston, Karamay Municipal Peoples Hospital, U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University and 21 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association | Year: 2015

Few studies have analysed the effect of sleep duration and snoring on hypertension and glycaemic control in patients with diabetes. This study aims to investigate the relationship of sleep duration and snoring on prevalent hypertension and glycaemic control in people with diabetes.In the baseline survey of the REACTION study, 56032 patients with diabetes were categorized into four groups according to self-reported sleep duration: <6, 6-7.9, 8-8.9 and 9h. Snoring frequency was evaluated as usually, occasionally or never. Hypertension was assessed by systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, self-reported previous diagnosis and antihypertensive medications. Good glycaemic control was defined as HbA1c <53mmol/mol (7.0%) and poor glycaemic control as HbA1c 53mmol/mol (7.0%).Controlling for potential confounders and intermediates, sleep 9h relative to intermediate sleep (6-7.9h) was significantly associated with prevalent hypertension (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.18-1.32) and poor glycaemic control (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.05-1.18), and a U-shaped association was found between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension (P for quadratic trend=0.019). Usually snoring was positively associated with prevalent hypertension (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.23-1.37), whereas the association between snoring and poor glycaemic control was only on the borderline of statistical significance.Compared with a sleep duration of 6-7.9h, longer sleep duration was associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension and poor glycaemic control in people with diabetes. Moreover, the relationship between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension was U-shaped. These findings may propose important public health implications for diabetes management.


Wang T.,National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases | Wang T.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Lu J.,National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases | Lu J.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 41 more authors.
Diabetic Medicine | Year: 2015

Aims: Few studies have analysed the effect of sleep duration and snoring on hypertension and glycaemic control in patients with diabetes. This study aims to investigate the relationship of sleep duration and snoring on prevalent hypertension and glycaemic control in people with diabetes. Methods: In the baseline survey of the REACTION study, 56 032 patients with diabetes were categorized into four groups according to self-reported sleep duration: < 6, 6-7.9, 8-8.9 and ≥ 9 h. Snoring frequency was evaluated as 'usually', 'occasionally' or 'never'. Hypertension was assessed by systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, self-reported previous diagnosis and antihypertensive medications. 'Good' glycaemic control was defined as HbA1c < 53 mmol/mol (7.0%) and 'poor' glycaemic control as HbA1c ≥ 53 mmol/mol (7.0%). Results: Controlling for potential confounders and intermediates, sleep ≥ 9 h relative to intermediate sleep (6-7.9 h) was significantly associated with prevalent hypertension (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.18-1.32) and poor glycaemic control (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.05-1.18), and a U-shaped association was found between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension (P for quadratic trend = 0.019). Usually snoring was positively associated with prevalent hypertension (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.23-1.37), whereas the association between snoring and poor glycaemic control was only on the borderline of statistical significance. Conclusions: Compared with a sleep duration of 6-7.9 h, longer sleep duration was associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension and poor glycaemic control in people with diabetes. Moreover, the relationship between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension was U-shaped. These findings may propose important public health implications for diabetes management. What's new?: Longer sleep duration (≥ 8 h) was positively associated with prevalent hypertension and poor glycaemic control in patients with diabetes, and the association between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension was U-shaped. The findings may have implications for diabetes management. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

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