Yokohama, Japan

Kanto Gakuin University

www.kanto-gakuin.ac.jp
Yokohama, Japan

Kanto Gakuin University is a private university located in Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Momose-Sato Y.,Kanto Gakuin University | Sato K.,Komazawa Women's University
Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience | Year: 2013

In the developing central nervous system, spontaneous activity appears well before the brain responds to external sensory inputs. One of the earliest activities is observed in the hindbrain and spinal cord, which is detected as rhythmic electrical discharges of cranial and spinal motoneurons or oscillations of Ca2+- and voltage-related optical signals. Shortly after the initial expression, the spontaneous activity appearing in the hindbrain and spinal cord exhibits a large-scale correlated wave that propagates over a wide region of the central nervous system, maximally extending to the lumbosacral cord and to the forebrain. In this review, we describe several aspects of this synchronized activity by focusing on the basic properties, development, origin, propagation pattern, pharmacological characteristics, and possible mechanisms underlying the generation of the activity. These profiles differ from those of the respiratory and locomotion pattern generators observed in the mature brainstem and spinal cord, suggesting that the wave is primordial activity that appears during a specific period of embryonic development and plays some important roles in the development of the central nervous system. © 2013 Momose-Sato and Sato.


Momose-Sato Y.,Kanto Gakuin University | Nakamori T.,Komazawa Women's University | Sato K.,Komazawa Women's University
European Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2012

During the early development of the nervous system, synchronized activity is observed in a variety of structures, and is considered to play a fundamental role in neural development. One of the most striking examples of such activity is the depolarization wave reported in chick and rat embryos. In the accompanying paper (Momose-Sato, 2012), we have demonstrated that a depolarization wave is also present in the mouse embryo by showing large-scale optical waves, which spread remarkably over the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, hindbrain, cerebellum, midbrain, and forebrain. In the present study, we examined the pharmacological nature of the mouse depolarization wave and its developmental changes. We show here that two types of switching in pharmacological characteristics occur during development. One is that the depolarization wave is strongly dependent on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors during the early developmental stage [embryonic day (E)11-12], but is dominated by glutamate at the later stage (E13 onwards). The second is that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which acts as an excitatory mediator of the depolarization wave during the early phase, becomes an inhibitory modulator by E14. These changes seemed to occur earlier in the hindbrain than in the spinal cord. Furthermore, we show that the second switch causes the loss of synchronization over the network, resulting in the disappearance of the depolarization wave and segregation of the activity into discrete regions of the medulla and spinal cord. We suggest that pharmacological switching is a possible mechanism underlz. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Momose-Sato Y.,Kanto Gakuin University | Nakamori T.,Komazawa Women's University | Sato K.,Komazawa Women's University
European Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2012

Spontaneous embryonic movements, called embryonic motility, are produced by correlated spontaneous activity in the cranial and spinal nerves, which is driven by brainstem and spinal networks. Using optical imaging with a voltage-sensitive dye, we have revealed previously that this correlated activity is a widely propagating wave of neural depolarization, which we termed the depolarization wave. We have observed in the chick and rat embryos that the activity spread over an extensive region of the CNS, including the spinal cord, hindbrain, cerebellum, midbrain and forebrain. One important consideration is whether a depolarization wave with similar characteristics occurs in other species, especially in different mammals. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of the depolarization wave in the mouse embryo by showing that the widely propagating wave appeared independently of the localized spontaneous activity detected previously with Ca 2+ imaging. Furthermore, we mapped the origin of the depolarization wave and revealed that the wave generator moved from the rostral spinal cord to the caudal cord as development proceeded, and was later replaced with mature rhythmogenerators. The present study, together with an accompanying paper that describes pharmacological properties of the mouse depolarization wave, shows that a synchronized wave with common characteristics is expressed in different species, suggesting fundamental roles in neural development. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Momose-Sato Y.,Kanto Gakuin University | Sato K.,Komazawa Women's University
European Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2016

The central issue in developmental neuroscience is when and how neural synaptic networks are established and become functional within the central nervous system (CNS). Investigations of the neural network organization have been hampered because conventional electrophysiological means have some technical limitations. In this study, the multiple-site optical recording technique with a voltage-sensitive dye was employed to survey the developmental organization of the vagal system in the mouse embryo. Stimulation of the vagus nerve in E11–E14 mouse embryos elicited optical responses in areas corresponding to the vagal sensory and motor nuclei. Postsynaptic responses in the first-order sensory nucleus, the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), were identified from E11, suggesting that sensory information becomes transferred to the brain at this stage. In addition to the NTS, optical responses were identified in the rostral and contralateral brainstem regions, which corresponded to second/higher order nuclei of the vagus nerve including the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Postsynaptic responses in the second/higher-order nuclei were detected from E12, suggesting that polysynaptic networks were functional at this stage. We discuss the results of our optical mapping, comparing them with previous findings obtained in the chick and rat embryos, and suggest some fundamental principles in the functional organization of synaptic networks in the embryonic brain. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd


Momose-Sato Y.,Kanto Gakuin University | Sato K.,Komazawa University
Frontiers in Neural Circuits | Year: 2016

Spontaneous activity in the developing central nervous system occurs before the brain responds to external sensory inputs, and appears in the hindbrain and spinal cord as rhythmic electrical discharges of cranial and spinal nerves. This spontaneous activity recruits a large population of neurons and propagates like a wave over a wide region of the central nervous system. Here, we review spontaneous activity in the chick hindbrain by focusing on this large-scale synchronized activity. Asynchronous activity that is expressed earlier than the above mentioned synchronized activity and activity originating in midline serotonergic neurons are also briefly mentioned. © 2016 Momose-Sato and Sato.


Patent
Kanto Gakuin University and Tokyo Ohka Kogyo | Date: 2013-05-17

A battery having high output voltage, high energy density and excellent charge and discharge cycle characteristics is achieved through the use of one of the following negative electrode base members as a negative electrode base member for lithium ion secondary batteries: a negative electrode base member where a metal film is formed on a support having an organic film; such a negative electrode base member where the surface layer of the organic film is covered with a metal oxide film; a negative electrode base member where a metal film is formed on a support having a composite film formed from a composite film-forming material containing an organic component and an inorganic component; and a negative electrode base member where a silica coating is formed, on a support having a photoresist pattern, from a silica film-forming coating liquid and a metal film is formed on the support after removing the photoresist pattern.


Patent
Kanto Gakuin University and Tokyo Ohka Kogyo | Date: 2013-05-17

A battery having high output voltage, high energy density and excellent charge and discharge cycle characteristics is achieved through the use of one of the following negative electrode base members as a negative electrode base member for lithium ion secondary batteries: a negative electrode base member where a metal film is formed on a support having an organic film; such a negative electrode base member where the surface layer of the organic film is covered with a metal oxide film; a negative electrode base member where a metal film is formed on a support having a composite film formed from a composite film-forming material containing an organic component and an inorganic component; and a negative electrode base member where a silica coating is formed, on a support having a photoresist pattern, from a silica film-forming coating liquid and a metal film is formed on the support after removing the photoresist pattern.


Patent
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo and Kanto Gakuin University | Date: 2012-07-04

The present invention aims to realize a battery having high output voltage, high energy density and excellent charge and discharge cycle characteristics through a constitution different from those of conventional batteries. Specifically, one of the following negative electrode base members is used as a negative electrode base member for lithium ion secondary batteries: a negative electrode base member wherein a metal film is formed on a support having an organic film; such a negative electrode base member wherein the surface layer of the organic film is covered with a metal oxide film; a negative electrode base member wherein a metal film is formed on a support having a composite film formed from a composite film-forming material containing an organic component and an inorganic component; and a negative electrode base member wherein a silica coating is formed, on a support having a photoresist pattern, from a silica film-forming coating liquid and a metal film is formed on the support after removing the photoresist pattern.


Momose-Sato Y.,Kanto Gakuin University | Sato K.,Komazawa Women's University
Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Widely correlated spontaneous activity in the developing nervous system is transiently expressed and is considered to play a fundamental role in neural circuit formation. The depolarization wave, which spreads over a long distance along the neuraxis, maximally extending to the lumbosacral cord and forebrain, is an example of this spontaneous activity. Although the depolarization wave is typically initiated in the spinal cord in intact preparations, spontaneous discharges have also been detected in the isolated brainstem. Although this suggests that the brainstem has the ability to generate spontaneous activity, but is paced by a caudal rhythm generator of higher excitability, a number of questions remains. Does brainstem activity simply appear as a passive consequence, or does any active change occur in the brainstem network to compensate for this activity? If the latter is the case, does this compensation occur equally at different developmental stages? Where is the new rhythm generator in the isolated brainstem? To answer these questions, we optically analyzed spatio-temporal patterns of activity detected from the chick brainstem before and after transection at the obex. The results revealed that the depolarization wave was homeostatically maintained, which was characterized by an increase in excitability and/or the number of neurons recruited to the wave. The wave was more easily maintained in younger embryos. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the ability of brainstem neurons to perform such an active compensation was not lost even at the stage when the depolarization wave was no longer observed in the intact brainstem. © 2014 IBRO.


Yamada T.,Kanto Gakuin University | Funaki Y.,University of Tsukuba
Physical Review C - Nuclear Physics | Year: 2010

The structure of 3/2⊃- and 1/2⊃+ states in B11 is investigated with an α+α+t orthogonality condition model (OCM) based on the Gaussian expansion method. Full levels up to the 3/23- and 1/22+ states around the α+α+t threshold (Ex=11.1 MeV) are reproduced consistently with the experimental energy levels. It is shown that the 3/23- state located around the 7Li+α threshold has an α+α+t cluster structure, whereas the 3/21- and 3/22- states have a shell-model-like compact structure. We found that the 3/23- state does not possess an α-condensate-like nature analogous to the 02+ state of C12 (Hoyle state) which has a dilute 3α-condensate structure described by a (0Sα)3 configuration with about 70% probability, although the monopole transition strength of the former is as large as that of the latter. We discuss the reasons why the 3/23- state does not have the condensate character. On the other hand, the 1/21+ state just below the 7Li+α threshold has a cluster structure that can be interpreted as a parity-doublet partner of the 3/23- state. We indicate that the 12.56-MeV state (Jπ=1/22+) just above the α+α+t threshold observed in the Li7(Li7,B11⊃*)t reaction, etc., is of the dilute cluster-gas-like configuration and is a strong candidate for the product states of clusters, having a configuration of (0Sα)2(0S t) with about 65% probability, from the analyses of the single-cluster motions in B11. The structure property of the 1/2⊃+ resonant state is analyzed with the complex scaling method. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

Loading Kanto Gakuin University collaborators
Loading Kanto Gakuin University collaborators