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Topeka, KS, United States

McQuilling M.,Saint Louis University | Potvin J.,Saint Louis University | Riley J.,Natick Soldier Research | Riley J.,Kansas Technology
28th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference | Year: 2010

This paper presents results from a Navier-Stokes finite volume flow solver simulating the flowfields around a platform and cargo configuration representative of platforms used for military parachute airdrops. The platform and cargo configuration consists of a flat plate model with an aspect ratio (width/length) of 0.56, upon which a box representing cargo is placed. This combination is simulated in conditions approximating the fall of a container prior to, and after parachute deployment and inflation, including a full 360° angle of attack range at a Reynolds number of 2.94.106 (freestream velocity of 30ft/s). The static simulations approximate those cases where the tumbling of the container (mostly prior to parachute deployment) is slow enough to approximate near-steady state flow conditions. Results include lift, drag, and moment coefficients over the range of flow conditions, as well as pressure contours to help elucidate relevant flow physics around the pallet-cargo configuration. Results show the flow orientation (into the nose bumper or flat side first) significantly affects the drag and moment behavior, but not the lift coefficient. Lift curve slopes match well to previously published data on pallet and cargo geometries as well as flat plates with similar aspect ratios. Drag and moment coefficients were significantly different between flow orientations; drag coefficients exhibit asymmetry between positive and negative angles of attack while moment coefficients illustrate that flow into the nose bumper may be more stable during extraction but much less stable during steady descent. © 2010 by Mark McQuilling.


McQuilling M.,Saint Louis University | McQuilling M.,Center for Fluids at All Scales | Potvin J.,Saint Louis University | Potvin J.,Center for Fluids at All Scales | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Aircraft | Year: 2011

This paper presents results from a Navier-Stokes finite volume flow solver simulating the flowfields around a platform and cargo configuration representative of platforms used for military parachute airdrops. The platform and cargo configuration consists of a flat-plate model with an aspect ratio (width/length) of 0.56 outfitted with a nose bumper, upon which a box representing cargo is placed. This combination is simulated in conditions approximating the fall of a container before and after parachute deployment and inflation, including a full 360° angle-of-attack range at Reynolds numbers of 2:94 × 106 and 9:80 × 106 (freestream velocities of 30 and 100 ft=s). The static simulations approximate those cases in which the tumbling and swinging of the container (mostly before parachute deployment or during descent) is slow enough to approximate near-steady-state flow conditions. Results include lift, drag, and moment coefficients over the range of flow conditions, as well as pressure contours to help elucidate relevant flow physics around the pallet-cargo configuration. Results show the flow orientation (into the nose bumper or flat side first) significantly affects the drag behavior, but not the lift or moment coefficients. Lift-curve slopes match well with previously published data on pallet and cargo geometries as well as flat plates with similar aspect ratios. Drag coefficients were significantly different between flow orientations and also exhibited asymmetry between positive and negative angles of attack. © 2011 by the authors. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.


Desabrais K.J.,U.S. Army | Desabrais K.J.,Kansas Technology | Johari H.,California State University, Northridge
Journal of Aircraft | Year: 2013

A series of wind-tunnel experiments were conducted in which the drag characteristics and inflated geometry of model parachute canopies with rectangular parallelepiped geometries (polyhedron) were examined. The modelcanopy layouts were the same as cross canopies with the adjacent sides completely attached together. All models had a base dimension of 0.2 m, and aspect ratios ranged from 0.2 to 1.2. The models did not have a central vent or any other geometric porosity. The data show the inflated geometry of the canopy differs from the constructed geometry with the smallest change occurring at a constructed aspect of 0.8 and the variation becomes larger for increasing or decreasing constructed aspect ratios. The data also indicate the aerodynamic drag coefficient, based on the projected area, has a maximum value of approximately one for the constructed aspect ratio of 0.3 corresponding to an inflated aspect ratio of 0.53. The drag coefficient is less for smaller and larger aspect-ratio models. If scaled by the canopy surface area drag of the rectangular parallelepiped canopies is lower than flat circular canopy designs. These findings are consistent with the past findings on other flexible parachute canopies and rigid bluff bodies. Copyright © 2012 Clearance Center, Inc.


Kansas Technology | Entity website

Heaped Capacity (ISO Rated)33 Cubic Yards25.23 Cubic Meters Struck Capacity19 Cubic Yards14 ...


Kansas Technology | Entity website

Heaped Capacity (ISO Rated)36 Cubic Yards27.52 Cubic Metres Struck Capacity24 Cubic Yards18 ...

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