Manhattan, KS, United States
Manhattan, KS, United States

Kansas State University, commonly shortened to Kansas State or K-State, is a public research university with its main campus in Manhattan, Kansas, United States. Kansas State was opened as the state's land-grant college in 1863 – the first public institution of higher learning in the state of Kansas. It had a record high enrollment of 24,766 students for the Fall 2014 semester.Branch campuses are located in Salina and Olathe. Salina houses the College of Technology and Aviation. The Olathe Innovation Campus is the academic research presence within the Kansas Bioscience Park, where graduate students participate in research bioenergy, animal health, plant science and food safety and security.The university is classified as a research university with high research by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Kansas State's academic offerings are administered through nine colleges, including the College of Veterinary Medicine and the College of Technology and Aviation in Salina. Graduate degrees offered include 65 master's degree programs and 45 doctoral degrees. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Kansas and Kansas State University | Date: 2016-11-21

A microfluidic exosome profiling platform integrating exosome isolation and targeted proteomic analysis is disclosed. This platform is capable of quantitative exosomal biomarker profiling directly from plasma samples with markedly enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Identification of distinct subpopulation of patient-derived exosomes is demonstrated by probing surface proteins and multiparameter analyses of intravesicular biomarkers in the selected subpopulation. The expression of IGF-1R and its phosphorylation level in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient plasma is assessed as a non-invasive alternative to the conventional biopsy and immunohistochemistry. Detection of ovarian cancer also is assessed. The microfluidic chip, which may be fabricated of a glass substrate and a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane), includes a serpentine microchannel to mix a fluid and a microchamber for the collection and detection of exosomes.


Methods of characterizing nanoparticles, nanoparticle complexes, and their biomolecular interactions are provided. Concurrent excitation and emission wavelength scans are performed and the optimal fluorescence intensity for the intersect of these wavelengths is determined. The intersect is dependent upon the physical characteristics of the particle and can be used to verify, for example, attachment of biomolecules, amount of biomolecules present, and structure of the attached biomolecule.


Patent
Kansas State University and University of Minnesota | Date: 2015-05-29

A protein conferring resistance to Fusarium Head Blight disease (FHB) is described, along with the DNA sequence of the corresponding gene and mRNA copy (cDNA). The cDNA of Fhb1 gene can be used to produce genetically-modified plants having increased resistance to FHB, particularly in wheat, barley and other plants affected by the disease. The protein has antifungal properties and inhibits fungal growth, thereby providing a means for reducing DON toxin in grains. Conserved functional domains are identified in the protein. Genetically-modified plants having increased resistance FHB are also described, along with methods for producing such genetically-modified plants.


Patent
Kansas State University | Date: 2017-01-26

The present invention provides for compositions and methods for producing sorghum crop plants that are resistant to herbicides. In particular, the present invention provides for sorghum plants, plant tissues and plant seeds that contain altered acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes and proteins that are resistant to inhibition by herbicides that normally inhibit the activity of the ALS protein.


Patent
Kansas State University | Date: 2015-07-08

Polymer-derived ceramic composites are described herein. The composites are formed using hexagonal boron nitride nanosheet-functionalized silicon-based ceramic precursor polymers. The composites a matrix of a polymer-derived ceramic and hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets embedded therein. Silicon-derived ceramic precursors such as polysilazane and/or polysiloxane are used to create improved SiCN and/or SiOC ceramic composites.


Patent
Kansas State University | Date: 2017-01-26

The present invention provides for compositions and methods for producing sorghum crop plants that are resistant to herbicides. In particular, the present invention provides for sorghum plants, plant tissues and plant seeds that contain altered acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes and proteins that are resistant to inhibition by herbicides that normally inhibit the activity of the ALS protein.


Mirafzal B.,Kansas State University
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2014

Inverters play key roles in motor drives, flexible power transmissions, and recently grid-tied renewable energy generation units. Therefore, availability and reliability of inverters have become increasingly important. Following early stage fault detections in inverters, remedial actions can extend normal operation of inverters and, in some cases, derate the system to prevent unexpected shutdowns. A remedial action typically contains a combination of hardware and software reconfigurations. The main purpose of this paper is to provide an instructive survey of existing fault-tolerance (remedial) techniques for three-phase, two-level, and multilevel inverters. © 2014 IEEE.


Aikens C.M.,Kansas State University
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters | Year: 2011

Gold and silver nanoclusters have unique molecule-like electronic structure and a nonzero HOMO-LUMO gap. Recent advances in X-ray crystal structure determination have led to a new understanding of the geometric structure of gold nanoparticles, with significant implications for electronic structure. The superatom model has been effectively employed to explain properties such as one- and two-photon optical absorption, circular dichroism, EPR spectra, and electronic effects introduced by nanoparticle doping. Future investigations may also lead to an understanding of nanoparticle luminescence, excited-state dynamics, and the metallic to molecular transition. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Macromolec/Supramolec/Nano | Award Amount: 271.77K | Year: 2017

Semiconductors, which comprise a class of solid materials with electrical conductivity intermediate between that of an insulator and that of a conductor, form the basic components of electronic circuits, light emitting diodes and sensor devices. Professor McLaurin employs microwaves to develop methods for semiconductor synthesis with the goal of more efficiently producing safer, superior nanocrystal (NC) materials known as quantum dots. Despite existing for more than 20 years, quantum dots are dominated by toxic heavy metal components and inefficient production methods. Dr. McLaurins method of microwave-assisted ionic liquid (MAIL) etching provides a unique, reproducible approach for the production of high quality NC materials, such as indium phosphide (InP), that avoids toxic heavy metals and inefficient production methods. Broader impacts of the research are apparent in environmental and energy technology gains. High-quality InP NCs open up avenues for applications in energy-efficient lighting and low-cost solar cells, helping address current uncertainties in the global energy landscape. The absence of toxic heavy metals also highlights additional possibilities for using these materials in biological sensing and imaging. Dr. McLaurin provides broader educational impacts in her laboratory and demonstration modules designed for middle, high school, and undergraduate students. Partnership with the Kansas Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation ensures broad diversity in her student base. Microwave ovens are a well-established home appliance, providing a good introduction to students of all ages. These simple microwave-based experiments relevant to nanotechnology and renewable energy applications offer hands-on experience with technologies central to our economy, ensuring future generations have relevant skills to be competitive in our global job environment.

This award by the Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry (MSN) Program supports the research program of Professor Emily McLaurin at Kansas State University (KSU) to devise mechanisms of semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) etching, and obtain new protocols for acquiring NCs with specific properties. Results from this research improve the scientific value of microwave-assisted syntheses of colloidal toxic heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Hg)-free NCs through development of new methodologies and by detailing mechanistic aspects of the reactions that explain observed advantages over conventional syntheses. Microwave-assisted ionic liquid (MAIL) etching provides access to new reaction space variables, including unique, reproducible pathways for production of high quality NCs by balancing in situ etching with NC growth. Broader impacts of the research are apparent in environmental and energy technology gains. Mechanistic studies of etching aid in obtaining InP NCs with tunable properties, which can transform the area of colloidal semiconductor NCs synthesis by demonstrating the utility and advantages of microwave-assisted methods. Information about the systems studied, including the etching mechanisms, is readily applicable to other materials. Dr. McLaurin provides broader educational impacts in her laboratory and demonstration modules designed for middle, high school, and undergraduate students. Including more women and underrepresented minorities in science and engineering disciplines is key to attracting new talent to STEM fields. Dr. McLaurin tackles this challenge through the design of accessible, interesting lab activities for the KSU summer programs and their integration with curriculum at the undergraduate (4-year and community college) levels. Modules integrating nanomaterials with microwave chemistry and renewable energy applications combine fundamental scientific knowledge with real-world applications creating a meaningful educational experience.


Berry V.,Kansas State University
Carbon | Year: 2013

This review discusses the genesis of impermeability in graphene and its extraordinary applications in fluid-encasement for wet electron-microscopy, selective gas-permeation, nanopore-bio-diffusion, and barrier coating against rusting and environmental hazards. As the thinnest material, graphene is composed of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms linked to one another in a 2D honeycomb lattice with high electron-density in its aromatic rings, which blocks-off all molecules. This phenomena, in combination with its strong structure (C-C bond energy = 4.9 eV and intrinsic strength = 43 N/m) makes graphene the most impermeable membrane (thinnest membrane that is impermeable). Apart from the applications mentioned above, graphene coatings have enabled fundamental studies on chemical processes and fluid structures. For example, graphene can allow electron imaging of nanocrystal nucleation process and water-lattice-structure due to its impermeability. Along with being the strongest, most conductive, and optically-absorbing material (∼2.3% optical absorbance), graphene's impermeability opens a wide range of exciting opportunities. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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