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Kanazawa-shi, Japan

The Kanazawa College of Art is a university in Kanazawa, Japan. It was founded in 1946 by the municipal government following World War II. The graduate program opened in 1979. Wikipedia.


Nakayasu A.,Kanazawa College of Art
SIGGRAPH Asia 2015 Posters, SA 2015 | Year: 2015

When we see the wriggling movement and the shape of a tentacle like the sea anemone under the sea, we feel an existence of a primitive life. The goal of this research is to realize the expression of a kinetic artwork or interactive artwork such as waving tentacles of sea anemones. At present, soft actuators that bend in multiple directions have been developed. However, these each have a complex structure or are expensive. To realize the expression of waving tentacles we need a large number of actuators. Therefore, we developed a budget actuator with a simple structure. Previously, we have introduced three motion patterns for controlling a SMA actuator that can bend in three directions and an experimental system with 9 actuators [Nakayasu 2014]. In this paper, we introduce an experimental system with 64 actuators that react to a hand's movement via an optical flow algorithm. Source


Kasuga K.,Kanazawa College of Art
Journal of physiological anthropology | Year: 2012

Stepping over an obstacle is a kind of compound movement that makes walking more difficult, especially for preschool children. This study examines sex and age-level differences in walking time in preschool children on an obstacle frame. The participants included 324 healthy preschool children: four-year-old boys (51) and girls (51), five-year-old boys (50) and girls (60), and six-year-old boys (62) and girls (50). A 5 cm- or 10 cm-high obstacle (depth 11.5 cm, width 23.5 cm) was set at the halfway point of a 200 cm × 10 cm walking course. The participants walked to the end of the course and back as fast as possible under three conditions: no obstacle, low obstacle and high obstacle. Walking time showed age-level differences in all conditions, but there were no differences in sex. Age levels were divided into two groups, with one group within the first six months of their birthday, and the second group within the last six months of that year. Walking time for children in the first half of their fourth year was longer than that of the five- and six-year-old children. In addition, for children in the last half of their fourth year, walking time was longer than both sexes in the last half of their fifth and sixth years. The children in the latter half of their fifth year had a longer walking time in the high obstacle condition than those in the last half of their sixth year. In the four-year-old participants, walking time was shorter with no obstacles than with a high obstacle frame. In the above data, obstacle course walking time does not show a gender difference, except that the four-year-old participants needed longer than the five- and six-year-old children. Setting the obstacle 10 cm high also produced a different walking time in the five- and six-year-old participants. The high obstacle step test (10 cm) best evaluated the dynamic balance of preschool children. Source


Uchida Y.,Kanazawa College of Art | Demura S.,Kanazawa University
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research | Year: 2015

Background: One-leg stance (OLS) training is often used to prevent falls in the elderly. The burden imposed on the supporting lower limb during OLS may differ depending on whether hand support is used, particularly in patients with decreased lower-limb strength. Aims: Here we examined the effect of hand support on leg muscle activity and body sway during OLS in elderly subjects able to maintain OLS for 1 min unaided [able group (AG), n = 13] and those who were unable to do so [unable group (UG), n = 11]. Methods: All subjects performed OLS unaided and OLS with front support (OLS-FS) using one hand for 1 min each. We estimated leg muscle activity [mean and maximum % root mean square (%RMS)] and body sway (total, X-axis, and Y-axis path lengths) for both tests. %RMS was calculated according to the results of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction test. Result: The overall average mean and maximum %RMS for the tibialis anterior muscle was larger in UG than in AG. In AG, tibialis anterior muscle mean and maximum %RMS and body sway was larger during OLS than during OLS-FS. Total and X-axis path lengths were larger during the first 20 s OLS phase in AG and the first 20 s OLS-FS phase in UG. Conclusion: These results highlight the need to differentiate between patients able and unable to perform OLS unaided for training because of differences in leg muscle activity. © 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland Source


Kasuga K.,Gifu University | Demura S.-i.,Kanazawa University | Aoki H.,Kanazawa College of Art | Shin S.,Gifu University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Physiological Anthropology | Year: 2012

Background: Stepping over an obstacle is a kind of compound movement that makes walking more difficult, especially for preschool children. This study examines sex and age-level differences in walking time in preschool children on an obstacle frame. Methods: The participants included 324 healthy preschool children: four-year-old boys (51) and girls (51), five-yearold boys (50) and girls (60), and six-year-old boys (62) and girls (50). A 5 cm- or 10 cm-high obstacle (depth 11.5 cm, width 23.5 cm) was set at the halfway point of a 200 cm × 10 cm walking course. Results: The participants walked to the end of the course and back as fast as possible under three conditions: no obstacle, low obstacle and high obstacle. Walking time showed age-level differences in all conditions, but there were no differences in sex. Age levels were divided into two groups, with one group within the first six months of their birthday, and the second group within the last six months of that year. Walking time for children in the first half of their fourth year was longer than that of the five- and six-year-old children. In addition, for children in the last half of their fourth year, walking time was longer than both sexes in the last half of their fifth and sixth years. The children in the latter half of their fifth year had a longer walking time in the high obstacle condition than those in the last half of their sixth year. In the four-year-old participants, walking time was shorter with no obstacles than with a high obstacle frame. Conclusions: In the above data, obstacle course walking time does not show a gender difference, except that the four-year-old participants needed longer than the five- and six-year-old children. Setting the obstacle 10 cm high also produced a different walking time in the five- and six-year-old participants. The high obstacle step test (10 cm) best evaluated the dynamic balance of preschool children. © 2012 Kasuga et al. Source


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