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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BURLINGTON, N.C. & RENTON, Wash. & ENGLEWOOD, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--LabCorp® (NYSE:LH) has completed the acquisition of Pathology Associates Medical Laboratories (PAML) from former owners Providence Health & Services (Providence) and Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI). PAML, based in Spokane, Washington, is one of the nation’s premier medical reference laboratories and a healthcare solutions company. With the acquisition of PAML, LabCorp assumes PAML’s ownership interests in several joint ventures: Colorado Laboratory Services (CLS), Kentucky Laboratory Services (KLS), MountainStar Clinical Laboratories (MSCL), PACLAB Network Laboratories (PACLAB) and Tri-Cities Laboratory (TCL). In addition, PAML, as a LabCorp subsidiary, has acquired assets of Alpha Medical Laboratories (Alpha), a former PAML-affiliated joint venture, from its hospital owner. “For over three decades, LabCorp has focused on comprehensive, deeply-engaged relationships with health systems and hospitals,” said David P. King, chairman and chief executive officer, LabCorp. “The acquisition of PAML furthers this strategy and aligns LabCorp with Providence and CHI, two leading, innovative health systems, and deepens our engagement and growth opportunities with a number of important community-based hospitals across multiple states.” LabCorp’s acquisition of PAML represents the first step in completing the transaction. Through 2017 and into 2018, LabCorp will acquire the ownership interests in CLS, KLS and PACLAB from their hospital co-owners. The hospital partners in MSCL and in TCL continue to evaluate future options for their interests in those joint ventures, which may include a sale to LabCorp. PAML and the joint ventures serve customers in Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Montana, Oregon, Utah and Washington. Operations of each joint venture, including the menu of services provided, will remain substantially the same until the joint venture transition is complete and ownership has been transferred. There will be no significant changes to operations or services at PAML until all joint venture transactions are complete. The organizations have been working together to plan and implement a smooth, thoughtful transition that maintains continuity of services for patients, hospitals, clients and clinicians, and provides access to the additional capabilities of LabCorp, including access to clinical trials and research through Covance Drug Development, enhanced IT and data analytics, standardized testing platforms and broad patient access. “PAML and its joint ventures have successfully served our communities and many others for years, and we are proud of the high-quality service they have become known for,” said Mike Butler, president of operations, Providence St. Joseph Health. “Together, LabCorp and PAML will continue and expand delivery of high-quality health care services to our patients, hospitals, clients and clinicians.” Through and after the completion of the related joint venture transactions, Providence, CHI and the hospital joint venture owners will continue to provide all existing in-patient hospital laboratory services. PAML, along with LabCorp, will continue to provide the outreach testing services and reference laboratory services currently provided by PAML and the joint ventures. LabCorp and many of the health systems and hospitals that are partnered with PAML are exploring opportunities to collaborate on projects involving LabCorp’s differentiated capabilities. “As part of our mission, CHI is focused on building healthier communities,” said Kevin Lofton, CEO, Catholic Health Initiatives. “We are confident that LabCorp, as PAML’s new owner, will serve the best interests of all who have relied on us to meet their health care needs through comprehensive, high-quality laboratory services.” “This acquisition strengthens LabCorp’s relationships with anchor health systems and expands LabCorp’s geographic presence in important existing markets, allowing LabCorp to support each health system and its existing customers with expanded offerings,” said King. “It was made possible by the mutual commitment among all the parties to provide high-quality, compassionate care, and to improve the health and lives of the patients we serve and the communities where we operate.” Providence Health & Services is committed to improving the health of the communities it serves, especially for those who are poor and vulnerable. In 2016, Providence provided nearly $1.2 billion in community benefit to help meet the needs of its communities, both today and into the future. Providence Health & Services is a part of Providence St. Joseph Health, a family of organizations that includes 50 hospitals, 829 physician clinics, senior services, supportive housing and many other health and educational services. The health system and its partners employ more than 100,000 caregivers serving communities across seven states – Alaska, California, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas and Washington. Along with Saint Joseph Health, PSJH includes: in Texas, Covenant Health and Covenant Medical Group; in California, Facey Medical Foundation, Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian and St. Joseph Heritage Healthcare; and in Washington, Kadlec Regional Medical Center, Pacific Medical Centers and Swedish Health Services. Catholic Health Initiatives, a nonprofit, faith-based health system formed in 1996 through the consolidation of four Catholic health systems, expresses its mission each day by creating and nurturing healthy communities in the hundreds of sites across the nation where we provide care. The nation’s third-largest nonprofit health system, Englewood, Colorado-based CHI operates in 18 states and comprises 104 hospitals, including four academic medical centers and major teaching hospitals as well as 30 critical-access facilities; community health-services organizations; accredited nursing colleges; home-health agencies; senior living communities; and other facilities and services that span the inpatient and outpatient continuum of care. In fiscal year 2016, CHI provided more than $1.1 billion in financial assistance and community benefit – a 13% increase over the previous year – for programs and services for the poor, free clinics, education and research. Financial assistance and community benefit totaled more than $2 billion with the inclusion of the unpaid costs of Medicare. The health system, which generated operating revenues of $15.9 billion in fiscal year 2016, has total assets of approximately $22.7 billion. LabCorp (NYSE: LH), an S&P 500 company, is a leading global life sciences company that is deeply integrated in guiding patient care, providing comprehensive clinical laboratory and end-to-end drug development services. With a mission to improve health and improve lives, LabCorp delivers world-class diagnostic solutions, brings innovative medicines to patients faster and uses technology to improve the delivery of care. LabCorp reported net revenues of nearly $9.5 billion for 2016 through the contributions of 52,000 employees in approximately 60 countries. To learn more about LabCorp, visit www.labcorp.com, and to learn more about Covance Drug Development, visit www.covance.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements including with respect to estimated 2017 guidance and the impact of various factors on operating and financial results. Each of the forward-looking statements is subject to change based on various important factors, including without limitation, competitive actions in the marketplace, and adverse actions of governmental and other third-party payers. Actual results could differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. The Company has no obligation to provide any updates to these forward-looking statements even if its expectations change. Further information on potential factors that could affect operating and financial results is included in the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, and subsequent Forms 10-Q, including in each case under the heading risk factors, and in the Company’s other filings with the SEC. The information in this press release should be read in conjunction with a review of the Company’s filings with the SEC including the information in the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, and subsequent Forms 10-Q, under the heading MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.


Reis L.M.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Tyler R.C.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Muheisen S.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Salviati L.,University of Padua | And 6 more authors.
Human Genetics | Year: 2013

Pediatric cataracts are observed in 1-15 per 10,000 births with 10-25 % of cases attributed to genetic causes; autosomal dominant inheritance is the most commonly observed pattern. Since the specific cataract phenotype is not sufficient to predict which gene is mutated, whole exome sequencing (WES) was utilized to concurrently screen all known cataract genes and to examine novel candidate factors for a disease-causing mutation in probands from 23 pedigrees affected with familial dominant cataract. Review of WES data for 36 known cataract genes identified causative mutations in nine pedigrees (39 %) in CRYAA, CRYBB1, CRYBB3, CRYGC (2), CRYGD, GJA8 (2), and MIP and an additional likely causative mutation in EYA1; the CRYBB3 mutation represents the first dominant allele in this gene and demonstrates incomplete penetrance. Examination of crystallin genes not yet linked to human disease identified a novel cataract gene, CRYBA2, a member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. The p.(Val50Met) mutation in CRYBA2 cosegregated with disease phenotype in a four-generation pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts with incomplete penetrance. Expression studies detected cryba2 transcripts during early lens development in zebrafish, supporting its role in congenital disease. Our data highlight the extreme genetic heterogeneity of dominant cataract as the eleven causative/likely causative mutations affected nine different genes, and the majority of mutant alleles were novel. Furthermore, these data suggest that less than half of dominant cataract can be explained by mutations in currently known genes. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


BURLINGTON, N.C. & RENTON, Wash. & ENGLEWOOD, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Laboratory Corporation of America® Holdings (LabCorp®) (NYSE:LH), Providence Health & Services (Providence) and Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI), today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement for LabCorp to acquire all of the ownership interest in Pathology Associates Medical Laboratories, LLC, (PAML), one of the nation’s premier medical reference laboratories and a healthcare solutions company jointly owned by Providence and CHI. In addition to PAML, LabCorp will also acquire PAML’s interest in the following joint ventures: Colorado Laboratory Services (CLS), Kentucky Laboratory Services (KLS), MountainStar Clinical Laboratories (MSCL), PACLAB Network Laboratories (PACLAB) and Tri-Cities Laboratory (TCL). “This signature transaction strengthens LabCorp’s relationships with anchor health systems and expands LabCorp’s geographic presence into important markets,” said David P. King, chairman and chief executive officer, LabCorp. “We have always admired the commitment of PAML, its owners and its joint venture partners to providing high-quality, community-based laboratory services. LabCorp shares that same vision and commitment, and is excited to work with these industry-leading health systems and hospitals as partners to continue to provide these services.” Headquartered in Spokane, Washington, PAML and its joint ventures provide laboratory services in California, Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Montana, Oregon, Utah and Washington. PAML is an industry leader in joint venture partnerships with community-based hospitals. The transactions involving PAML and the PAML-affiliated joint ventures expand LabCorp’s geographic scope in the Pacific Northwest, Midwest and South. LabCorp currently provides services to several Swedish Medical Center facilities in Seattle, a partner within the Providence system. “We are proud of the high-quality service PAML and its joint ventures have provided,” said Mike Butler, president of operations, chief executive, Providence Health & Services. “We routinely evaluate how to best deliver health care services to the communities we serve and LabCorp will continue to meet the rapidly changing needs of patients and providers.” In addition, the hospital co-owners of CLS, based in Lakewood, Colorado; KLS, based in Lexington, Kentucky; and PACLAB Network Laboratories, based in Renton, Washington; have all agreed to sell their joint venture interests to LabCorp. The hospital partners in MSCL, based in Salt Lake City, Utah, and in TCL, based in Kennewick, Washington, continue to evaluate future options for their ownership of the joint venture, which may include a sale to LabCorp. The hospital co-owner of Alpha Medical Laboratory (Alpha), a PAML-affiliated joint venture based in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, intends to acquire PAML’s interest in Alpha; after which it will sell the joint venture assets to LabCorp upon final board approval. After the staged transactions are complete, Providence, CHI and the hospital joint venture owners will continue to provide all existing in-patient hospital laboratory services. LabCorp will then continue to provide the outreach testing services and reference laboratory services currently provided by PAML and the joint ventures that are part of the overall transactions. The transactions do not include any PAML joint venture services in California. “As part of our mission, CHI is focused on building healthier communities. This goal guides our business decisions in the constantly changing dynamics and demands of health care today,” said Kevin Lofton, CEO, Catholic Health Initiatives. “We are confident that our selection of LabCorp to be PAML’s new owner will serve the best interests of all who rely on us to meet their health care needs through comprehensive, high quality laboratory services.” The transactions are subject to customary closing conditions, including clearance under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, as amended. The parties anticipate that transaction closings will begin in 2017 and continue into 2018. There will be no changes to operations or services at PAML or the joint ventures until the applicable transaction is complete. The organizations will work together to plan and implement a smooth, thoughtful transition that maintains continuity of services for patients, hospitals, clients and clinicians while providing direct access to the additional capabilities of LabCorp. Other terms of the transactions were not disclosed and no additional information is available at this time. Providence Health & Services is committed to improving the health of the communities it serves, especially for those who are poor and vulnerable. In 2016, Providence provided nearly $1.2 billion in community benefit to help meet the needs of its communities, both today and into the future. Providence Health & Services is a part of Providence St. Joseph Health, a family of organizations that includes 50 hospitals, 829 physician clinics, senior services, supportive housing and many other health and educational services. The health system and its partners employ more than 100,000 caregivers serving communities across seven states – Alaska, California, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas and Washington. Along with Saint Joseph Health, PSJH includes: in Texas, Covenant Health and Covenant Medical Group; in California, Facey Medical Foundation, Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian and St. Joseph Heritage Healthcare; and in Washington, Kadlec Regional Medical Center, Pacific Medical Centers and Swedish Health Services. Catholic Health Initiatives, a nonprofit, faith-based health system formed in 1996 through the consolidation of four Catholic health systems, expresses its mission each day by creating and nurturing healthy communities in the hundreds of sites across the nation where we provide care. The nation’s third-largest nonprofit health system, Englewood, Colorado-based CHI operates in 18 states and comprises 103 hospitals, including four academic medical centers and major teaching hospitals as well as 30 critical-access facilities; community health-services organizations; accredited nursing colleges; home-health agencies; senior living communities; and other facilities and services that span the inpatient and outpatient continuum of care. In fiscal year 2016, CHI provided more than $1.1 billion in financial assistance and community benefit – a 13% increase over the previous year -- for programs and services for the poor, free clinics, education and research. Financial assistance and community benefit totaled more than $2 billion with the inclusion of the unpaid costs of Medicare. The health system, which generated operating revenues of $15.9 billion in fiscal year 2016, has total assets of approximately $22.7 billion. Laboratory Corporation of America® Holdings (NYSE: LH), an S&P 500 company, is a world leading life sciences company, providing comprehensive clinical laboratory and end-to-end drug development services. With a mission to improve health and improve lives, LabCorp delivers world-class diagnostic solutions, brings innovative medicines to patients faster and uses technology to provide better care. With net revenue in excess of $9 billion in 2016, LabCorp’s 50,000 employees serve clients in 60 countries. To learn more about LabCorp, visit www.labcorp.com, and to learn more about Covance Drug Development, visit www.covance.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements including with respect to LabCorp’s (the Company) estimated 2017 guidance and the impact of various factors on operating and financial results. Each of the forward-looking statements is subject to change based on various important factors, including without limitation, competitive actions in the marketplace and adverse actions of governmental and other third-party payers. Actual results could differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. The Company has no obligation to provide any updates to these forward-looking statements even if its expectations change. Further information on potential factors that could affect LabCorp’s operating and financial results is included in the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, and subsequent Forms 10-Q, including in each case under the heading risk factors, and in the Company’s other filings with the SEC. The information in this press release should be read in conjunction with a review of the Company’s filings with the SEC including the information in the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, and subsequent Forms 10-Q, under the heading MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.


Loewen G.,Providence Regional Cancer Center | Jayawickramarajah J.,Tulane University | Zhuo Y.,Kadlec Regional Medical Center | Shan B.,Washington State University
Journal of hematology & oncology | Year: 2014

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) govern fundamental biochemical and cellular processes. lncRNA HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) represses gene expression through recruitment of chromatin modifiers. The expression of HOTAIR is elevated in lung cancer and correlates with metastasis and poor prognosis. Moreover, HOTAIR promotes proliferation, survival, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance in lung cancer cells. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying HOTAIR-mediated aggressive phenotypes of lung cancer. We also discuss HOTAIR's potential in diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, as well as the challenges of exploiting HOTAIR for intervention of lung cancer.


Brown A.,Kadlec Regional Medical Center
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy | Year: 2012

Purpose. The use of anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized medical and surgical oncology patients is discussed. Summary. Hospitalized patients are often at risk for developing VTE, and risk is increased in patients who have cancer. Moreover, the incidence of VTE appears to be rising in hospitalized cancer patients, who have a 2.2-fold increased risk of mortality with a VTE compared with similar patients without VTE. The literature indicates that these patients are often inadequately anticoagulated, despite strong recommendations for prophylaxis. Although there are few studies that specifically address VTE prophylaxis in cancer patients, there are several large trials that have examined data in cancer subgroups. The trials have directly compared low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) with placebo, unfractionated heparin with LMWH, factor Xa inhibitor (fondaparinux) with placebo, and fondaparinux with LMWH. Three important guidelines provide current recommendations for VTE prophylaxis; the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), theNational Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) recommend unfractionated heparin, LMWH, or fondaparinux for VTE prophylaxis when there are no contraindications. Pharmacists can play an essential role in ensuring that VTE prophylaxis is appropriate for individual patients. Interventions to improve compliance with guidelines are particularly important now due to financial incentives from qualityfocused organizations whose mandate is to decrease preventable mortality events in hospitals. Conclusion. Hospitalized patients with cancer often do not receive appropriate thromboprophylaxis. Guidelines from ASCO, ACCP, and NCCN recommend unfractionated heparin, an LMWH, or fondaparinux for VTE prophylaxis when there are no contraindications to such therapy. Copyright © 2012, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.


Smith R.P.,Maine Medical Center Research Institute | Elias S.P.,Maine Medical Center Research Institute | Borelli T.J.,Maine General Medical Center | Missaghi B.,University of Calgary | And 8 more authors.
Emerging Infectious Diseases | Year: 2014

We observed an increase in the ratio of pathogenic Babesia microti to B. odocoilei in adult Ixodes scapularis ticks in Maine. Risk for babesiosis was associated with adult tick abundance, Borrelia burgdorferi infection prevalence, and Lyme disease incidence. Our findings may help track risk and increase the focus on blood supply screening. © 2014, Emerging Infectious Diseases. All Rights Reserved.


Munshi M.N.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Florez H.,University of Miami | Huang E.S.,University of Chicago | Kalyani R.R.,Johns Hopkins University | And 5 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2016

Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tailored based on comorbidities, delineates key issues to consider when using glucose-lowering agents in this population, and provides recommendations on how to replace SSI in LTC facilities. As these patients transition from one setting to another, or from one provider to another, their risk for adverse events increases. Strategies are presented to reduce these risks and ensure safe transitions. This article addresses diabetes management at end of life and in those receiving palliative and hospice care. The integration of diabetes management into LTC facilities is important and requires an interprofessional team approach. To facilitate this approach, acceptance by administrative personnel is needed, as are protocols and possibly system changes. It is important for clinicians to understand the characteristics, challenges, and barriers related to the older population living in LTC facilities as well as the proper functioning of the facilities themselves. Once these challenges are identified, individualized approaches can be designed to improve diabetes management while lowering the risk of hypoglycemia and ultimately improving quality of life. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.


PubMed | Kadlec Regional Medical Center and Mountainview Womens Health Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of mid-life health | Year: 2017

Ovarian remnant syndrome (ORS) is a rare condition, in which the ovarian tissue is inadvertently left behind after difficult oophorectomy. The most common preexisting conditions associated for this complication include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and prior abdominal surgery as in these conditions, removal of ovarian tissue becomes difficult. This is likely due to the presence of the dense fibrotic adhesions between an ovary and the surrounding structures. This residual ovarian tissue can become functional and cystic. A 56-year-old multigravida postmenopausal female was diagnosed with intestinal obstruction. She had multiple abdominal surgeries in the past, including cholecystectomy, appendectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Patient underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intraoperatively, extensive adhesions and scarring of bowel wall were present and approximately 15 cm proximal to the terminal ileum, a small bowel mesenteric nodule was present. Histopathology of the mesenteric nodule was consistent with the diagnosis of overian remnant. ORS can be prevented with careful resection of the entire ovarian tissue during the difficulty oophorectomy so that no ovarian tissue is left behind.


PubMed | University of Miami, University of Chicago, American Diabetes Association, Johns Hopkins University and 5 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Diabetes care | Year: 2016

Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tailored based on comorbidities, delineates key issues to consider when using glucose-lowering agents in this population, and provides recommendations on how to replace SSI in LTC facilities. As these patients transition from one setting to another, or from one provider to another, their risk for adverse events increases. Strategies are presented to reduce these risks and ensure safe transitions. This article addresses diabetes management at end of life and in those receiving palliative and hospice care. The integration of diabetes management into LTC facilities is important and requires an interprofessional team approach. To facilitate this approach, acceptance by administrative personnel is needed, as are protocols and possibly system changes. It is important for clinicians to understand the characteristics, challenges, and barriers related to the older population living in LTC facilities as well as the proper functioning of the facilities themselves. Once these challenges are identified, individualized approaches can be designed to improve diabetes management while lowering the risk of hypoglycemia and ultimately improving quality of life.


PubMed | Virginia Mason Medical Center, Providence Alaska Medical Center, University of Washington, Ohio State University and Kadlec Regional Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics | Year: 2016

Screening multiple genes for inherited cancer predisposition expands opportunities for cancer prevention; however, reports of variants of uncertain significance (VUS) may limit clinical usefulness. We used an expert-driven approach, exploiting all available information, to evaluate multigene panels for inherited cancer predisposition in a clinical series that included multiple cancer types and complex family histories.For 1,462 sequential patients referred for testing by BROCA or ColoSeq multigene panels, genomic DNA was sequenced and variants were interpreted by multiple experts using International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines and incorporating evolutionary conservation, known and predicted variant consequences, and personal and family cancer history. Diagnostic yield was evaluated for various presenting conditions and family-history profiles.Of 1,462 patients, 12% carried damaging mutations in established cancer genes. Diagnostic yield varied by clinical presentation. Actionable results were identified for 13% of breast and colorectal cancer patients and for 4% of cancer-free subjects, based on their family histories of cancer. Incidental findings explaining cancer in neither the patient nor the family were present in 1.7% of subjects. Less than 1% of patients carried VUS in BRCA1 or BRCA2. For all genes combined, initial reports contained VUS for 10.5% of patients, which declined to 7.5% of patients after reclassification based on additional information.Individualized interpretation of gene panels is a complex medical activity. Interpretation by multiple experts in the context of personal and family histories maximizes actionable results and minimizes reports of VUS.Genet Med 18 10, 974-981.

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