Nakuru, Kenya
Nakuru, Kenya

Kabarak University is a purpose-built Christian based university on a 600-acre farm located 20 kilometres from Nakuru, Kenya , on the Nakuru–Eldama Ravine road in Kenya's Rift Valley. The campus features an outdoor swimming pool, sports areas, tree-shaded lawns and residential facilities for over 1,000 students. The university also operates a Town Campus in Nakuru, conveniently situated close to the commercial center of the town. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Korom R.R.,Penda Health | Korom R.R.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Onguka S.,Kabarak University | Halestrap P.,AIC Kijabe Hospital | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2017

Background: The quality of primary care delivered in resource-limited settings is low. While some progress has been made using educational interventions, it is not yet clear how to sustainably improve care for common acute illnesses in the outpatient setting. Management of urinary tract infection is particularly important in resource-limited settings, where it is commonly diagnosed and associated with high levels of antimicrobial resistance. We describe an educational programme targeting non-physician health care providers and its effects on various clinical quality metrics for urinary tract infection. Methods: We used a series of educational interventions including 1) formal introduction of a clinical practice guideline, 2) peer-to-peer chart review, and 3) peer-reviewed literature describing local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Interventions were conducted for clinical officers (N = 24) at two outpatient centers near Nairobi, Kenya over a one-year period. The medical records of 474 patients with urinary tract infections were scored on five clinical quality metrics, with the primary outcome being the proportion of cases in which the guideline-recommended antibiotic was prescribed. The results at baseline and following each intervention were compared using chi-squared tests and unpaired two-tailed T-tests for significance. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess for possible confounders. Findings: Clinician adherence to the guideline-recommended antibiotic improved significantly during the study period, from 19% at baseline to 68% following all interventions (χ2 = 150.7, p < 0.001). The secondary outcome of composite quality score also improved significantly from an average of 2.16 to 3.00 on a five-point scale (t = 6.58, p < 0.001). Interventions had different effects at different clinical sites; the primary outcome of appropriate antibiotic prescription was met 83% of the time at Penda Health, and 50% of the time at AICKH, possibly reflecting differences in onboarding and management of clinical officers. Logistic regression analysis showed that intervention stage and clinical site were independent predictors of the primary outcome (p < 0.0001), while all other features, including provider and patient age, were not significant at a conservative threshold of p < 0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that brief educational interventions can dramatically improve the quality of care for routine acute illnesses in the outpatient setting. Measurement of quality metrics allows for further targeting of educational interventions depending on the needs of the providers and the community. Further study is needed to expand routine measurement of quality metrics and to identify the interventions that are most effective in improving quality of care. © 2017 Korom et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Nyanja T.A.N.,Aga Khan University | Nyanja T.A.N.,Kabarak University | Tulinius C.,Copenhagen University | Tulinius C.,Cambridge College
African Journal of AIDS Research | Year: 2017

Efforts to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Tanzania are guided by a four-prong strategy advocated by the World Health Organization (WHO). Prong 2, prevention of unintended pregnancies among women living with HIV, has, however, received the least attention and contraceptive use to prevent unintended pregnancies remains low. This study explored the perceived barriers to the use of modern methods of contraception, and factors influencing contraceptive choice among HIV-positive women in urban Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. A qualitative multi-site study was conducted, utilising in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 37 sexually active HIV-positive women aged between 20 and 44 years, attending three health facilities within Dar-es-Salaam. The theoretical framework was a patient centred model. Four barriers were identified: the influence of the women’s spousal relationships; personal beliefs and the relationship of these in understanding her disease; the influence of the social demands on the woman and her relationships; and the importance of a woman’s relationship with her healthcare provider/healthcare system. Being the bearers of bad news (HIV-positive status) the pregnant women experienced conflicts, violence, abandonment and rejection. The loss in negotiating power for the women was in relation to their intimate partners, but also in the patient–healthcare provider relationship. The role of the male partner as a barrier to contraceptive use cannot be understated. Therefore, the results suggest that healthcare providers should ensure patient-focused education and provide support that encompasses the importance of their relationships. Additional research is required to elucidate the functional association between contraceptive choices and personal and social relationships. © 2017 NISC (Pty) Ltd


Karie N.M.,University of Pretoria | Karie N.M.,Kabarak University | Venter H.S.,University of Pretoria
Journal of Forensic Sciences | Year: 2015

Since its inception, over a decade ago, the field of digital forensics has faced numerous challenges. Despite different researchers and digital forensic practitioners having studied and analysed various known digital forensic challenges, as of 2013, there still exists a need for a formal classification of these challenges. This article therefore reviews existing research literature and highlights the various challenges that digital forensics has faced for the last 10 years. In conducting this research study, however, it was difficult for the authors to review all the existing research literature in the digital forensic domain; hence, sampling and randomization techniques were employed to facilitate the review of the gathered literature. Taxonomy of the various challenges is subsequently proposed in this paper based on our review of the literature. The taxonomy classifies the large number of digital forensic challenges into four well-defined and easily understood categories. The proposed taxonomy can be useful, for example, in future developments of automated digital forensic tools by explicitly describing processes and procedures that focus on addressing specific challenges identified in this paper. However, it should also be noted that the purpose of this paper was not to propose any solutions to the individual challenges that digital forensics face, but to serve as a survey of the state of the art of the research area. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.


Too W.,Kabarak University | Watson M.,University of Nottingham | Harding R.,King's College | Seymour J.,University of Nottingham
BMC Palliative Care | Year: 2015

Background: Globally, the majority of people with HIV/AIDS live in sub-Saharan Africa. While the increasing availability of antiretroviral therapy is improving the outlook for many, its effects are yet to reach all of those in need and patients still present with advanced disease. This paper reports findings from qualitative interviews with patients living with AIDS and their caregivers who were receiving palliative care from Hospice Africa Uganda (HAU). We aimed to understand what motivated patients and their families to seek formal healthcare, whether there were any barriers to help- seeking and how the help and support provided to them by HAU was perceived. Methods: We invited patients with AIDS and their relatives who were newly referred to HAU to participate in qualitative interviews. Patients and carers were interviewed in their homes approximately four weeks after the patient's enrolment at HAU. Interviews were translated, transcribed and analysed using narrative and thematic approaches. Results: Interviews were completed with 22 patients (10 women and 12 men) and 20 family caregivers, nominated by patients. Interviews revealed the extent of suffering patients endured and the strain that family caregivers experienced before help was sought or accessed. Patients reported a wide range of severe physical symptoms. Patients and their relatives reported worries about the disclosure of the AIDS diagnosis and fear of stigma. Profound poverty framed all accounts. Poverty and stigma were, depending on the patient and family situation, both motivators and barriers to help seeking behaviour. Hospice services were perceived to provide essential relief of pain and symptoms, as well as providing rehabilitative support and a sense of caring. The hospice was perceived relieve utter destitution, although it was unable to meet all the expectations that patients had. Conclusion: Hospice care was highly valued and perceived to effectively manage problems such as pain and other symptoms and to provide rehabilitation. Participants noted a strong sense of being "cared for". However, poverty and a sense of stigma were widespread. Further research is needed to understand how poverty and stigma can be effectively managed in hospice care for patients for advanced AIDS and their families. © 2015 Too et al.


Thiga M.,Kabarak University
2016 IST-Africa Conference, IST-Africa 2016 | Year: 2016

This paper examines the use of Network-based location determination as an alternative to symbolic locations in the provision of location-based mobile advertising services using SMS and USSD. Two alternatives are explored; the use of reverse geo-coding and the use of coordinates to identify the locations of both users and providers. Both approaches are found to be feasible. However, the lack of a detailed geo-code database for use in reverse geo-coding as well as the lack of mobile network cooperation in the provision of user coordinates emerge as the main challenges to implementing the proposed model. © 2016 IIMC.


Kebenei J.S.,Kabarak University | Ndalut P.K.,Moi University | Sabah A.O.,Kenya Medical Research Institute
Journal of Medicinal Plants Research | Year: 2011

A Plasmodium falciparum in vitro drug sensitive study was conducted in order to evaluate artemisinin in combination with potential anti-malarial drug from the stem bark of Erythrina abyssinica. Abyssinone-v was isolated and thus identified as a potential partner for a fixed combination therapy. Bioassay guided chromatographic separation of Ethyl acetate extract of Erythrina abyssinica led to the isolation of Abyssinone-v with IC 50 value of 3.19 μg/ml against chloroquine-sensitive (D6) P. falciparum parasites. The structure of abyssinone-v was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectroscopic technique. The interaction of artemisinin and abyssinone-v was analyzed using combination ratios of 10:90 to 90:10 respectively against P. falciparum parasites. This led to the identification of anti-malarial combination therapy of artemisinin and abyssinone-v with sum of fraction inhibiting concentration (FIC) of 0.79 at a ratio of 2:3, respectively. ©2011 Academic Journals.


Siror J.K.,Kabarak University | Kibet P.K.,Kabarak University
International Journal of RF Technologies: Research and Applications | Year: 2014

Demands for a more efficient clearance of human traffic and goods while addressing the ever increasing risks of terrorist, criminal and other illegal activities has become critical for government administrations especially in handling cross-border cargo and goods. Manual based methods are increasingly becoming overwhelming, ineffective and often lead to considerable delays. Thorough scrutiny in order to detect all violations often results in slower cargo clearance and pile-up of cargo. A compromise on the level of scrutiny has to be adopted so as to allow acceptable flow of cargo. Research therefore needs to be undertaken on solutions capable of addressing the twin problems of security and facilitation of faster flow of cargo. This paper proposes an intelligent border where RFID based cargo tracking solutions are used for transit cargo from port of entry to exit in order to facilitate passage without stoppage, checks or delays where no violations are observed during the trip. The business logic, design components and the requisite RFID infrastructure are discussed. Details of the simulations and simulation results that were used to test the design, business logic and work flow are provided. © 2014 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.


Kebenei J.S.,Kabarak University | Ndalut P.K.,Moi University | Sabah A.O.,Kenya Medical Research Institute
International Journal of Applied Research in Natural Products | Year: 2011

The decoction of the root bark of Carrisa edulis is used traditionally for treatment of malaria and other ailments. Plasmodium falcipurum in vitro drug sensitive study was conducted in order to evaluate the correlation between the ethno medicinal use and bioactivity of fractions and total extract of the plant. Methanolic extract of the root bark of carissa edulis showed anti-plasmodial activity against the chloroquin-senitive (D6) strains of plasmodium falciparum parasite with IC50 value of 1.95 Dg/ml. From this extract, a lignan compound nortrachelogenin was isolated and showed anti-plasmodium activity of 14.50 Dg/ml. The structure was determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. © 2011. IJARNP-HS Publication.


Karie N.M.,University of Pretoria | Karie N.M.,Kabarak University | Venter H.S.,University of Pretoria
Journal of Forensic Sciences | Year: 2014

Ontologies are widely used in different disciplines as a technique for representing and reasoning about domain knowledge. However, despite the widespread ontology-related research activities and applications in different disciplines, the development of ontologies and ontology research activities is still wanting in digital forensics. This paper therefore presents the case for establishing an ontology for digital forensic disciplines. Such an ontology would enable better categorization of the digital forensic disciplines, as well as assist in the development of methodologies and specifications that can offer direction in different areas of digital forensics. This includes such areas as professional specialization, certifications, development of digital forensic tools, curricula, and educational materials. In addition, the ontology presented in this paper can be used, for example, to better organize the digital forensic domain knowledge and explicitly describe the discipline's semantics in a common way. Finally, this paper is meant to spark discussions and further research on an internationally agreed ontological distinction of the digital forensic disciplines. Digital forensic disciplines ontology is a novel approach toward organizing the digital forensic domain knowledge and constitutes the main contribution of this paper. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.


PubMed | Kabarak University, University of Derby and King's College London
Type: | Journal: BMC palliative care | Year: 2015

Globally, the majority of people with HIV/AIDS live in sub-Saharan Africa. While the increasing availability of antiretroviral therapy is improving the outlook for many, its effects are yet to reach all of those in need and patients still present with advanced disease. This paper reports findings from qualitative interviews with patients living with AIDS and their caregivers who were receiving palliative care from Hospice Africa Uganda (HAU). We aimed to understand what motivated patients and their families to seek formal healthcare, whether there were any barriers to help- seeking and how the help and support provided to them by HAU was perceived.We invited patients with AIDS and their relatives who were newly referred to HAU to participate in qualitative interviews. Patients and carers were interviewed in their homes approximately four weeks after the patients enrolment at HAU. Interviews were translated, transcribed and analysed using narrative and thematic approaches.Interviews were completed with 22 patients (10 women and 12 men) and 20 family caregivers, nominated by patients. Interviews revealed the extent of suffering patients endured and the strain that family caregivers experienced before help was sought or accessed. Patients reported a wide range of severe physical symptoms. Patients and their relatives reported worries about the disclosure of the AIDS diagnosis and fear of stigma. Profound poverty framed all accounts. Poverty and stigma were, depending on the patient and family situation, both motivators and barriers to help seeking behaviour. Hospice services were perceived to provide essential relief of pain and symptoms, as well as providing rehabilitative support and a sense of caring. The hospice was perceived relieve utter destitution, although it was unable to meet all the expectations that patients had.Hospice care was highly valued and perceived to effectively manage problems such as pain and other symptoms and to provide rehabilitation. Participants noted a strong sense of being cared for. However, poverty and a sense of stigma were widespread. Further research is needed to understand how poverty and stigma can be effectively managed in hospice care for patients for advanced AIDS and their families.

Loading Kabarak University collaborators
Loading Kabarak University collaborators