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Beavercreek, OH, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2010

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is strongly associated with emotional and physical health problems, of which PTSD and depression are important mediators. There is a significant overlap between of military members who have experienced and/or witnessed a life threatening event and sustained a blast or other TBI. There is a need to develop a user-friendly, empirically-based, neuropsychological screening tool to be used by first responders to screen for mTBI. In Phase I, JXT will assess the co-occurrence of these neurocognitive and emotional events, determine the problems and associated conditions, examine the long term implications and evaluate diagnostic instruments in order to distinguish who is most at risk for becoming impaired. From this information, JXT will identify a pool of neuropsychological and emotional health test items to be used to construct a Statistical and Evidence-Grounded mTBI Evaluation and Neuro-assessment (SEGMEN) Tool; identify and document important control and mediator variables; specify the criterion/outcome variables; and prepare to evaluate the reliability and validity of the SEGMAN Tool in Phase II. This effort will be driven by the innovative JXT Test Construction and Validation Process Model. We will also create an automated conceptual demonstration of the SEGMEN Tool to assess usability and commercial potential.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

Cognitive readiness of individuals and teams is of increasing concern in network-centric warfare where teams play an increasingly vital role in networked military operations. Therefore, it is essential to expand the construct of cognitive readiness from individuals to team cognitive readiness through novel representations such as Team Mental Models (TMMs). In addition, there is interest in including tacit knowledge in the cognitive readiness construct to be incorporated in a TMM. This proposal asserts that tacit knowledge is largely the product of implicit learning and is the knowledge structure that is generated by this learning process. Using this theoretical approach, we propose to incorporate tacit knowledge into the appropriate dimensions of the cognitive readiness construct and assess and track it using a TMM conceptual design and innovative technologies available to the JXT Team. We propose to develop technologies to elicit tacit knowledge from team communication data, represent in our TMM conceptual design, develop techniques based on similarity indices to bring the TMM into alignment with team beliefs, and provide effective visualization techniques to foster intuitive understanding of the TMM. We call this tacit knowledge and cognitive readiness research program and prototype development ACRUT (Assessing Cognitive Readiness Using TMMs).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 649.98K | Year: 2011

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with emotional and physical health problems, of which PTSD and depression are important mediators. Our Phase I research created a conceptual model for a user-friendly, empirically-based screening/tracking tool available to first responders and medical practitioners to screen for mTBI or other disorders. We assessed the co-occurrence of these co-morbid disorders with mTBI, determined the associated conditions, examined the implications, and evaluated diagnostic instruments that distinguish who is most at risk of impairment. From this information, JXT identified a pool of neuropsychological, neurological, physiological, and other test instruments for inclusion in a Statistical and Evidence-Grounded mTBI Evaluation and Neuro-assessment (SEGMEN) Tool. We documented important control and mediator variables; specified outcome variables; and prepared to evaluate the SEGMEN Tool in Phase II. This effort was driven by the innovative JXT Test Construction and Validation process model. We also created a conceptual demonstration of the SEGMEN Tool to assess usability and commercial potential. In Phase II, we will execute numerous, retrospective validation studies of the pool of test instruments, select the most powerful discriminators, and install them in a SEGMEN Tool prototype that can operate in stand-alone mode or integrated with Military Medical Systems located anywhere.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2008

“Brownout” is a dangerous phenomenon in which a rotorcraft’s downwash creates its own degraded visual environment (DVE) by throwing dust, sand, and other loose debris into the air around the aircraft, severely limiting or obscuring the pilots’ view of the landing environment. During a recent fiscal year, the U.S. Army determined that 75% of aviation Class A mishaps in Operation Iraqi Freedom were attributed to this phenomenon. The objective of this research effort is to determine the feasibility of integrating symbology into a helmet-mounted display (HMD) to aid rotorcraft pilots in day/night brownout/DVE conditions, and identify the steps needed to develop this technology for aviation applications. The feasibility of such an approach depends on the development of effective, intuitive HMD symbology that provides the pilot with the data required to facilitate rotorcraft landing operations. One of the challenges of this development will be determining and mitigating the effects of the expected wide variations in day/night brownout/DVE background condition against which the HMD symbology will be viewed. HMD display symbology for this application must provide high contrast against the background, with low intensity and eye strain, particularly with night vision devices.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2009

Though members of the military have long been susceptible as victims of injuries from explosions; this has become increasingly prevalent with the employment of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Iraq and elsewhere. Combat medical personnel and their civilian counterparts must be trained to recognize and understand the mechanism of injury from explosives and provide proper assessment, care and evacuation to survivors. In most blast circumstances a mass casualty situation will result. This will likely require an effective and accurate patient triage to accomplish the principle of achieving the greatest good for the greatest number. Triage procedures are relatively simple to apply, however they are most difficult for first responders to employ. This project develops and demonstrates a prototype sim-game based training adjunct for Combat Medics with current emergency medical technician (EMT) and advanced skills training.

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