Cleveland, OH, United States
Cleveland, OH, United States

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Patent
Juventas Therapeutics Inc. and Cleveland Clinic | Date: 2015-04-28

Provided herein are methods of treating a cardiomyopathy in a subject by administering directly to, or expressing locally in, a weakened, ischemic, and/or peri-infarct region of myocardial tissue of the subject an amount of SDF-1 effective to cause functional improvement in at least one of the following parameters: left ventricular volume, left ventricular area, left ventricular dimension, cardiac function, 6-minute walk test, or New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. Methods of treating subjects with advanced ischemic cardiomyopathy are further disclosed herein.


Penn M.S.,Summa Cardiovascular Institute | Penn M.S.,Northeast Ohio Medical University | Penn M.S.,Juventas Therapeutics Inc. | Pastore J.,Juventas Therapeutics Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Gene Therapy | Year: 2012

Stem cell therapy for the prevention and treatment of cardiac dysfunction holds significant promise for patients with ischemic heart disease. Excitingly early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and some clinical feasibility, while at the same time studies in the laboratory have investigated mechanisms of action and strategies to optimize the effects of regenerative cardiac therapies. One of the key pathways that has been demonstrated critical in stem cell-based cardiac repair is (stromal cell-derived factor-1) SDF-1:CXCR4. SDF-1:CXCR4 has been shown to affect stem cell homing, cardiac myocyte survival and ventricular remodeling in animal studies of acute myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure. Recently released clinical data suggest that SDF-1 alone is sufficient to induce cardiac repair. Most importantly, studies like those on the SDF-1:CXCR4 axis have suggested mechanisms critical for cardiac regenerative therapies that if clinical investigators continue to ignore will result in poorly designed studies that will continue to yield negative results. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Penn M.S.,Summa Cardiovascular Institute | Penn M.S.,Northeast Ohio Medical University | Mendelsohn F.O.,Center for Therapeutic Angiogenesis | Schaer G.L.,Rush University Medical Center | And 8 more authors.
Circulation Research | Year: 2013

RATIONALE:: Preclinical studies indicate that adult stem cells induce tissue repair by activating endogenous stem cells through the stromal cell-derived factor-1:chemokine receptor type 4 axis. JVS-100 is a DNA plasmid encoding human stromal cell-derived factor-1. OBJECTIVE:: We tested in a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study with 12 months of follow-up in subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy to see if JVS-100 improves clinical parameters. METHODS AND RESULTS:: Seventeen subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy, New York Heart Association class III heart failure, with an ejection fraction ≤40% on stable medical therapy, were enrolled to receive 5, 15, or 30 mg of JVS-100 via endomyocardial injection. The primary end points for safety and efficacy were at 1 and 4 months, respectively. The primary safety end point was a major adverse cardiac event. Efficacy end points were change in quality of life, New York Heart Association class, 6-minute walk distance, single photon emission computed tomography, N-Terminal pro-brain natruretic peptide, and echocardiography at 4 and 12 months. The primary safety end point was met. At 4 months, all of the cohorts demonstrated improvements in 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and New York Heart Association class. Subjects in the 15- and 30-mg dose groups exhibited improvements in 6-minute walk distance (15 mg: median [range]: 41 minutes [3-61 minutes]; 30 mg: 31 minutes [22-74 minutes]) and quality of life (15 mg: -16 points [+1 to -32 points]; 30 mg: -24 points [+17 to -38 points]) over baseline. At 12 months, improvements in symptoms were maintained. CONCLUSIONS:: These data highlight the importance of defining the molecular mechanisms of stem cell-based tissue repair and suggest that overexpression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 via gene therapy is a strategy for improving heart failure symptoms in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.


Patent
Juventas Therapeutics Inc. and The Cleveland Clinc Foundation | Date: 2014-03-15

The subject matter provided herein relates to method for inhibiting or mitigating scar formation in a wound of the skin, by increasing the concentration of SDF-1 in, or proximate to, the wound. As described herein SDF-1 protein or an SDF-1 expression vector can be administered to a wound or the area proximate a wound by providing a therapeutically effective amount of SDF-1 protein or an SDF-1 expression vector.


Patent
Juventas Therapeutics Inc. and Cleveland Clinic | Date: 2014-02-07

The subject matter provided herein relates to method for inhibiting or mitigating scar formation in a wound of the skin, by increasing the concentration of SDF-1 in, or proximate to, the wound. As described herein SDF-1 protein or an SDF-1 expression vector can be administered to a wound or the area proximate a wound by providing a therapeutically effective amount of SDF-1 protein or an SDF-1 expression vector.


Patent
Juventas Therapeutics Inc. and Cleveland Clinic | Date: 2012-10-12

The subject matter provided herein relates to method for inhibiting or mitigating scar formation in a wound of the skin, by increasing the concentration of SDF-1 in, or proximate to, the wound. As described herein SDF-1 protein or an SDF-1 expression vector can be administered to a wound or the area proximate a wound by providing a therapeutically effective amount of SDF-1 protein or an SDF-1 expression vector.


Patent
Cleveland Clinic and Juventas Therapeutics Inc. | Date: 2014-03-15

Described herein are methods of treating a subject with a cardiomyopathy by administering to the subjects heart, via percutaneous retrograde coronary sinus perfusion, a pharmaceutical composition that comprises a DNA plasmid encoding SDF-1 and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier or diluent.


Patent
Juventas Therapeutics Inc. and Cleveland Clinic | Date: 2013-12-09

A method of treating a cardiomyopathy in a subject includes administering directly to or expressing locally in a weakened, ischemic, and/or peri-infarct region of myocardial tissue of the subject an amount of SDF-1 effective to cause functional improvement in at least one of the following parameters: left ventricular volume, left ventricular area, left ventricular dimension, cardiac function, 6-minute walk test, or New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification.


News Article | May 13, 2015
Site: www.finsmes.com

Juventas Therapeutics, Inc., a Cleveland, OH-based clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on developing non-viral gene therapies to treat advanced cardiovascular diseases, secured $13.5m in financing. Green Cross Holdings and Posco Capital led a $7.5m Series B-2 equity investment that included participation from other new and existing investors. Additionally, Juventas secured $6m in debt financing from Oxford Finance with an opportunity to obtain an additional $9m if specific milestones are met. Juventas Therapeutics also expanded its Board of Directors to include James Boland as an independent director. Mr. Boland is the retired vice chairman of Ernst & Young and former president, chief executive officer and vice chairman of the Cleveland Cavaliers Operating Company. He currently serves as Chairman of JobsOhio and is on the Board of the Center for Global Business Studies in Washington D.C. Founded in 2007 and led by Rahul Aras, Ph.D., president and chief executive officer, Juventas is a clinical stage biotechnology company focused on developing non-viral gene therapies to treat advanced cardiovascular diseases. Its lead product candidate, JVS-100, is a non-viral gene therapy undergoing evaluation in clinical studies for the treatment of advanced cardiovascular diseases.  with an exclusive license from the Cleveland Clinic.

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