Huntingdon, PA, United States
Huntingdon, PA, United States

Juniata College is a private American liberal arts college in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, United States. Founded in 1876 as a co-educational school, it was the first college started by the Church of the Brethren. Today, Juniata has about 1,600 students, who hail from 28 states and territories and 26 foreign countries. Its current president is Dr. James A. Troha. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has determined its ranking of the best colleges in Pennsylvania for 2017. 50 four-year schools were included on the list, with University of Pennsylvania, Lehigh University, Carnegie Mellon University, Duquesne University and University of Scranton ranked as the top five. 25 two-year schools were also ranked, with Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology, Harrisburg Area Community College—Harrisburg, University of Pittsburgh—Titusville, Bucks County Community College and Manor College taking the top five spots on the list. A list of all winning schools is included below. “These Pennsylvania colleges and universities offer not only great degree programs but also excellent resources for preparing students for post-college careers,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “They have demonstrated superior overall value to students by providing an overall positive, high-quality educational experience.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Pennsylvania” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is also ranked on metrics like the variety of degree programs offered, the number of employment and academic resources offered, financial aid availability, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Pennsylvania” list, visit: Best Four-Year Colleges in Pennsylvania for 2017 include: Allegheny College Arcadia University Bryn Mawr College Bucknell University Carnegie Mellon University Cedar Crest College Chatham University DeSales University Dickinson College Drexel University Duquesne University Eastern University Elizabethtown College Franklin and Marshall College Gannon University Gettysburg College Gwynedd Mercy University Haverford College Holy Family University Immaculata University Juniata College King's College La Salle University Lafayette College Lebanon Valley College Lehigh University Marywood University Mercyhurst University Messiah College Misericordia University Moravian College Muhlenberg College Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus Rosemont College Saint Francis University Saint Joseph's University Saint Vincent College Susquehanna University Swarthmore College Temple University University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Campus University of Scranton University of the Sciences Ursinus College Villanova University Washington & Jefferson College Westminster College Widener University-Main Campus York College Pennsylvania Best Two-Year Colleges in Pennsylvania for 2017 include: Bucks County Community College Butler County Community College Commonwealth Technical Institute Community College of Allegheny County Community College of Beaver County Community College of Philadelphia Delaware County Community College Harcum College Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg Johnson College Lackawanna College Lehigh Carbon Community College Luzerne County Community College Manor College Montgomery County Community College Northampton County Area Community College Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Pennsylvania Institute of Technology Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics Reading Area Community College Rosedale Technical Institute Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology University of Pittsburgh - Titusville Valley Forge Military College Westmoreland County Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--GlobalReach Business Solutions is pleased to announce and welcome Jim Jacketti as Vice President of Business Development Americas. Many of our US customers and partners already know Jim, who has been providing excellent customer services across the Life Science industry, for over 20 years. Jim has been involved in all aspects of R&D, Knowledge Management, Business Intelligence and other areas within the Pharmaceutical & Biotech vertical, implementing Current Drugs’ Investigational Drugs database (IDdb), which was sold to Thomson (where Jim became the Senior Director of North American Sales and then started a new division offering Custom Solutions), Current BioData’s Targeted Protein database (TPdb) and various other start-ups. Should you be an innovative biotech company looking for venture investments, or new partnering opportunities; should you be a medium sized entity looking into new products or new markets; or should you be a large organisation in need of temporary support for your Business Intelligence; Jim will be the best person to talk to provide you the solution you need. Jim holds a B.S. degree in Biochemistry from Juniata College and has helped start-up companies become successful. We look forward to building new partnerships across the country and help our customers translate their innovation into economic success & growth. You can contact Jim directly on Cell: +1 (215) 776-0365 or by email at jim.jacketti@globalreachbi.com Alternatively, you can set up a 30 mins discussion (simply click on blue link) directly with Jim now. GlobalReach Business Solutions mission is to provide business intelligence and international development services with the aim of improving its clients’ competitive edge and supporting their ambitions on global basis. Business Intelligence simplifies all coordinated actions of information discovery and analysis; making it possible for decision makers at all levels of an organisation to access, understand, analyse, collaborate and act on information, in a timely manner.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RICHLAND, Wash. - Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to see dramatic shifts in the make-up of the community of microbes in their gut than healthy people, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 13 in Nature Microbiology. While scientists have known that there are differences in the bacteria and other microbes that make up the gut microbiome in IBD patients, this is one of the largest studies to watch the microbiome over a period of time. The findings indicate that the biggest difference in the microbiome of patients is the way it fluctuates - what the researchers call "volatile dysbiosis." The results help physicians and scientists understand the disease more fully and potentially offer new ways to track the disease and monitor patients. The findings come from a team of scientists from Sweden, Spain, Germany and the United States. Janet Jansson of the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is the corresponding author of the paper. "We know that there are some key beneficial microbes that are lower in number in people with inflammatory bowel disease. Sometimes the differences are quite substantial," said Jansson. "Our latest results show that patients affected by this condition also have a much less stable gut microbiome than healthy people." IBD encompasses a group of diseases where the body's immune system attacks microbes in the gut, causing chronic inflammation in the digestive tract and giving rise to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and other unpleasant and sometimes life-threatening symptoms. Many patients have periods when the condition causes minor problems, then flares up and becomes more serious. Medications such as powerful anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids are common treatments, and surgery is an option in severe cases. Scientists know that there are some differences in the microbiomes of patients with IBD patients compared to healthy people - for instance, patients generally have fewer beneficial microbes and they are more likely to carry bacteria such as Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli. But questions remain. "It's important to know not just what microbes are present, but also to understand how the microbial community changes as patients' symptoms improve or worsen over time," said author Colin Brislawn, a PNNL scientist who contributed to the statistical analysis. "We explored the dynamic nature of the disease as it relates to the dynamic nature of the human gut microbiome." To do the study, gastroenterologist Jonas Halfvarson of Örebro University in Sweden and colleagues studied 137 people for two years. Participants included patients with ulcerative colitis, colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and healthy controls. Physicians collected fecal samples from patients every three months for up to two years and monitored patients' symptoms. Overall 683 fecal samples were collected. Scientists then used genetic sequencing technology to identify the microbes in the samples. The team found that in healthy people, the gut microbial community is much more consistent over time than in patients with IBD. Patients with IBD have dramatic shifts in their microbiomes, with some bacteria disappearing almost completely at times - something that rarely happened in the healthy people studied. In some IBD patients, more than half their microbiome was displaced by other microbes in just a few months. The biggest swings were seen in patients with ileal Crohn's disease who had had part of their intestine removed to alleviate their symptoms. The scientists also noted that changes in medication to treat the disease affected the microbiome; for example, patients who had taken steroids as part of treatment had more fluctuations in their microbiome than patients who had not. And patients who were experiencing a flare-up in their symptoms were more likely to have dramatic fluctuations in their microbiome. The scientists say the findings might one day contribute to the diagnosis of patients or allow physicians to follow the course of the disease and track the effectiveness of medication in patients more closely. "The results are an important step in our aim to understand how the microbiome relates to the dynamics of inflammatory bowel disease," said Halfvarson. "Ultimately, manipulation of the microbiome, aiming to mimic the situation and the trajectories of healthy individuals, might become an attractive treatment strategy to maintain IBD patients in remission, especially if immunosuppressants such as corticosteroids can be avoided." The study includes authors from PNNL, Örebro University in Sweden, the University of California at San Diego, the Max Planck Institute in Germany, the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, the Biodonostia Health Research Institute in Spain, and Juniata College in Pennsylvania. The study was funded primarily by the National Institutes of Health. Additional support came from the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, the Örebro University Hospital Research Foundation, the Swedish Research Council, and other organizations. Jonas Halfvarson, Colin J. Brislawn, Regina Lamendella, Yoshiki Vázquez-Baeza, William A. Walters, Lisa M. Bramer, Mauro D'Amato, Ferdinando Bonfiglio, Daniel McDonald, Antonio Gonzalez, Erin E. McClure, Mitchell F. Dunklebarger, Rob Knight and Janet K. Jansson, Dynamics of the human gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease, Nature Microbiology, Feb. 13, 2017, http://dx. .


Glazier D.S.,Juniata College
Biological Reviews | Year: 2015

A common, long-held belief is that metabolic rate drives the rates of various biological, ecological and evolutionary processes. Although this metabolic pacemaker view (as assumed by the recent, influential 'metabolic theory of ecology') may be true in at least some situations (e.g. those involving moderate temperature effects or physiological processes closely linked to metabolism, such as heartbeat and breathing rate), it suffers from several major limitations, including: (i) it is supported chiefly by indirect, correlational evidence (e.g. similarities between the body-size and temperature scaling of metabolic rate and that of other biological processes, which are not always observed) - direct, mechanistic or experimental support is scarce and much needed; (ii) it is contradicted by abundant evidence showing that various intrinsic and extrinsic factors (e.g. hormonal action and temperature changes) can dissociate the rates of metabolism, growth, development and other biological processes; (iii) there are many examples where metabolic rate appears to respond to, rather than drive the rates of various other biological processes (e.g. ontogenetic growth, food intake and locomotor activity); (iv) there are additional examples where metabolic rate appears to be unrelated to the rate of a biological process (e.g. ageing, circadian rhythms, and molecular evolution); and (v) the theoretical foundation for the metabolic pacemaker view focuses only on the energetic control of biological processes, while ignoring the importance of informational control, as mediated by various genetic, cellular, and neuroendocrine regulatory systems. I argue that a comprehensive understanding of the pace of life must include how biological activities depend on both energy and information and their environmentally sensitive interaction. This conclusion is supported by extensive evidence showing that hormones and other regulatory factors and signalling systems coordinate the processes of growth, metabolism and food intake in adaptive ways that are responsive to an organism's internal and external conditions. Metabolic rate does not merely dictate growth rate, but is coadjusted with it. Energy and information use are intimately intertwined in living systems: biological signalling pathways both control and respond to the energetic state of an organism. This review also reveals that we have much to learn about the temporal structure of the pace of life. Are its component processes highly integrated and synchronized, or are they loosely connected and often discordant? And what causes the level of coordination that we see? These questions are of great theoretical and practical importance. © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.


Glazier D.S.,Juniata College
Biological Reviews | Year: 2010

The scaling of metabolic rate with body mass has long been a controversial topic. Some workers have claimed that the slope of log-log metabolic scaling relationships typically obeys a universal 3/4-power law resulting from the geometry of resource-transport networks. Others have attempted to explain the broad diversity of metabolic scaling relationships. Although several potentially useful models have been proposed, at present none successfully predicts the entire range of scaling relationships seen among both physiological states and taxonomic groups of animals and plants. Here I argue that our understanding may be aided by three shifts in focus: from explaining average tendencies to explaining variation between extreme boundary limits, from explaining the slope and elevation (metabolic level) of scaling relationships separately to showing how and why they are interrelated, and from focusing primarily on internal factors (e.g. body design) to a more balanced consideration of both internal and external (ecological) factors. By incorporating all of these shifts in focus, the recently proposed metabolic-level boundaries hypothesis appears to provide a useful way of explaining both taxonomic and physiological variation in metabolic scaling relationships. This hypothesis correctly predicts that the scaling slope should vary mostly between 2/3 and 1 and that it should be related to metabolic (activity) level according to an approximately U-shaped function. It also implies that the scaling of other energy-dependent biological processes should be related to the metabolic level of the organisms being examined. Some data are presented that support this implication, but further research is needed. © 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 485.85K | Year: 2016

This RCN-UBE project will investigate the function of unknown genes in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Bakers or Brewers yeast). The genome of this yeast was sequenced 20 years ago, yet nearly 10% of the genes have no assigned function; these genes are called orphan genes. Determining the function of the complete set of genes in this simple model organism will meaningfully contribute to the understanding of how cells function. The goal of the Yeast Orphan Gene Project is to organize a consortium of undergraduate student researchers and faculty to coordinate resources and design experimental strategies to assign functions to orphan genes in yeast.

Based on analysis of available bioinformatics data sets, students will design and execute experiments for defining gene function. The network will facilitate collaboration between students at different institutions so that students can share strategies and technique solutions while developing experience in on-line collaborations. Scientifically, the project will contribute to a more detailed understanding of the biology of yeast and the structure of the yeast genome. Ultimately, the yeast orphan gene project aims to use the process of determining orphan gene function as a tool to teach undergraduate students key concepts in bioinformatics, genomics, molecular biology, and genetics and impart valuable experience in scientific collaboration and leadership. The network will provide tools for faculty to expand research experience for undergraduates and incorporate research experiences into undergraduate courses. It will also be a mechanism to distribute a tested model of an authentic course-based research experience to a diverse set of institutions by providing workshop and assessment support. Through sharing of resources, the network will develop a model for online course modules to be shared among institutions. The networking activities will expand the expertise of faculty, as well as provide undergraduates tools and resources for collaboration.

This project is being jointly funded by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education as part of their efforts to address the challenges posed in Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action (http://visionandchange/finalreport/).


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 1.01M | Year: 2016

With funding from the National Science Foundations Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, the Juniata College Energizing STEM Teaching Across Rural Schools (E-STARS) program recruits undergraduate majors in biology, chemistry, geology, math and physics, to additionally earn their secondary teaching certification to teach science or mathematics in grades 7 to 12, focusing on underserved, and underperforming rural schools. The project is funding a minimum of 20 scholarships over five years. Juniata College is collaborating with Huntingdon Area School District, Juniata Valley School District, Mount Union Area School District, and Southern Huntingdon Area School District. The E-STARS Scholarship program will bring together Juniata science, mathematics, and education faculty, and Juniatas Science in Motion (SIM) educators in partnerships with neighboring rural school districts, to graduate more engaged educators who have experience in and are equipped with tools to negotiate the challenging rural teaching environment. Upon graduation, E-STARS Scholars will have developed a solid foundation in their respective STEM fields, have a plethora of high quality curricular resources, and will also have completed a training program that is enriched with hands-on, inquiry based teaching experiences highlighting the uniqueness of populations in underserved rural middle and high schools.

In addition to the scholarships in the junior and senior years, the project will fund summer opportunities for freshmen and sophomore STEM students to explore the educational field in a 5 week summer course which will include three college credits of course material over three weeks on the foundational structure of education systems and an additional credit for 70 field placement hours in schools including: 40 hours with an in-service teacher in his/her rural math or science classroom and 30 additional hours traveling and presenting science labs with the Juniata College SIM outreach program. E-STARS scholars will also fully participate each summer in STEM focused workshops for in-service teachers. In addition, each E-STARS scholar will receive a summer stipend for working on research or an internship that is STEM education focused. All scholars will participate in state and national professional organizations, attending and presenting at their respective conferences. The E-STARS Leadership Team will work with an external evaluator to understand the effectiveness of the program. The evaluation will be used to develop evidence-based recommendations for enhancing the training of rural STEM educators at other mid-sized liberal-arts institutions of higher education, which will be disseminated by the Leadership Team at state and national scientific and mathematical professional conferences.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: TUES-Type 1 Project | Award Amount: 445.04K | Year: 2013

The focus of this RCN-UBE project is to support and expand participation in the newly formed Genome Consortium for Active Teaching using Next-generation Sequencing (GCAT-SEEK). Genomics and bioinformatics are dynamic fields well-suited for capturing the imagination of undergraduates in both research laboratories and classrooms. However, high costs, demanding technical skills, and high rates of change inhibit integration of next-generation sequencing approaches into the undergraduate curriculum. GCAT-SEEK aims to generate and use massively parallel sequencing data associated with the research interests of network members as the catalyst for producing innovative and broadly disseminated educational modules that offer authentic research experiences to students. The goals of this project are to increase network participation, produce and disseminate educational modules that are assessed for student learning gains, foster a sense of community among network faculty and students, and support network communications. Hands-on faculty/student workshops centered on participant research projects are the key implementation strategy.

Anticipated outcomes include improved faculty expertise, increased authentic student research experiences for undergraduates, and production of innovative, effective educational modules that improve student preparation for graduate, technical and research careers. We anticipate impacting thousands of students via this project. Workshops will be moved around the country to include three minority serving host institutions to bolster participation by groups under-represented in STEM disciplines.

This project is being jointly funded by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education as part of their efforts towards support of Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 552.20K | Year: 2011

Juniata College, a highly regarded liberal arts college in Pennsylvania, is using its S-STEM award to make it possible for community college transfer students to attend Juniata for their last two years of college while studying for STEM majors. Cost and admissions requirements make such transfers rare, but with the assistance of S-STEM scholarships and through active recruiting at local community colleges, with which Juniata has transfer agreements, the PI and his team identify high achieving STEM students inviting them to apply for scholarships as they apply for admission. The presence of such students representing a diversity of backgrounds and ethnicities enhances the education of all students. A wealth of support systems and mentoring ensures that the Scholars are included in the campus community, while co-curricular events, some specifically for the Scholars, help to retain them in their STEM major preparing them for scientific careers. In the summer between the junior and senior year, Scholars participate in the Summer Undergraduate Research Program, a key feature of most programs showing success in STEM recruitment and retention. Over the five years of the grant, about 24 students will become Scholars in four cohorts of 6 students each. In addition to preparing these students for STEM careers, the experiences of the challenges and opportunities of working with community college transfer students will inform aspects of advising and pedagogy that can be widely shared.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Campus Cyberinfrastrc (CC-NIE) | Award Amount: 349.92K | Year: 2014

This project upgrades the campus network for Juniata College to 10Gbps and establishes a connection to Internet2 via 3ROX. Juniata College hosts a high capacity compute cluster for a consortium of undergraduate institutions working in genomics research. The Genome Consortium for Active Teaching, using high throughput Next Generating Sequencing (GCAT-SEEK), provides sequencing technologies and genomic analysis training to faculty and students to support on-going research projects at 132 partnering institutions. Campus networking improvements enable greater end-to-end performance and reliability for students and research users of the compute cluster, and improves network-based access to central resources for computational biology required for research projects involving analysis and comparison of whole genome data sets. The expanded network is an essential advancement as it allows teams of faculty and students to participate in cutting-edge genomics research projects and provide authentic research experiences to undergraduates at the partnering institutions. The increased network capacity enhances undergraduate classroom teaching, enabling students from multiple institutions to simultaneously access the software and computational resources of the compute cluster. The cyber infrastructure improvements include the expansion of the internal local area network (LAN), an increase in Internet2 connectivity, and connections to resources within larger frameworks at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. This strategy presents a financially-feasible model for increased Internet2 connectivity that may be adopted by other small institutions. Design, manuals and tutorials are made available to partnering institutions. GCAT-SEEK activities also include studies of the broader ethical, legal and social implications of advances in the field of genomics. Addressing these topics is critical for training the next generation of scientists, physicians and healthcare policy experts.

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