Entity

Time filter

Source Type

University of Technology of Compiègne, France

Chiarucci A.,University of Siena | Araujo M.B.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | Araujo M.B.,University of Evora | Decocq G.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Vegetation Science | Year: 2010

We discuss the usefulness of the concept of Potential Natural Vegetation (PNV), which describes the expected state of mature vegetation in the absence of human intervention. We argue that it is impossible to model PNV because of (i) the methodological problems associated to its definition and (ii) the issues related to the ecosystems dynamics.We conclude that the approach to characterizing PNV is unrealistic and provides scenarios with limited predictive power. In places with a long-term human history, interpretations of PNV need to be very cautious, and explicit acknowledgement made of the limitations inherent in available data. © 2010 International Association for Vegetation Science.


Lefranc M.,Amiens University Hospital | Lefranc M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Manto M.,Laboratory of Experimental Neurology | Merle P.,Amiens University Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Cerebellum | Year: 2014

Deep brain stimulation of the thalamus (and especially the ventral intermediate nucleus) does not significantly improve a drug-resistant, disabling cerebellar tremor. The dentato-rubro-olivary tract (Guillain-Mollaret triangle, including the red nucleus) is a subcortical loop that is critically involved in tremor genesis.We report the case of a 48-year-old female patient presenting with generalized cerebellar tremor caused by alcohol-related cerebellar degeneration. Resistance to pharmacological treatment and the severity of the symptoms prompted us to investigate the effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the red nucleus. Intra-operative microrecordings of the red nucleus revealed intense, irregular, tonic background activity but no rhythmic components that were synchronous with upper limb tremor. The postural component of the cerebellar tremor disappeared during insertion of the macro-electrodes and for a few minutes after stimulation, with no changes in the intentional (kinetic) component. Stimulation per se did not reduce postural or intentional tremor and was associated with dysautonomic symptoms (the voltage threshold for which was inversed related to the stimulation frequency). Our observations suggest that the red nucleus is (1) an important centre for the genesis of cerebellar tremor and thus (2) a possible target for drug-refractory tremor. Future research must determine how neuromodulation of the red nucleus can best be implemented in patients with cerebellar degeneration. © Springer Science+Business Media 2014.


Pepin A.,Amiens University Medical Center | Daouk J.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Bailly P.,Amiens University Medical Center | Hapdey S.,University of Rouen | And 2 more authors.
Nuclear Medicine Communications | Year: 2014

Combined PET/computed tomography (CT) is of value in cancer diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment planning. For cancers located in the thorax or abdomen, the patient's breathing causes artifacts and errors in PET and CT images. Many different approaches for artifact avoidance or correction have been developed; most are based on gated acquisition and synchronization between the respiratory signal and PET acquisition. The respiratory signal is usually produced by an external sensor that tracks a physiological characteristic related to the patient's breathing. Respiratory gating is a compensation technique in which time or amplitude binning is used to exclude the motion in reconstructed PET images. Although this technique is performed in routine clinical practice, it fails to adequately correct for respiratory motion because each gate can mix several tissue positions. Researchers have suggested either selecting PET events from gated acquisitions or performing several PET acquisitions (corresponding to a breath-hold CT position). However, the PET acquisition time must be increased if adequate counting statistics are to be obtained in the different gates after binning. Hence, other researchers have assessed correction techniques that take account of all the counting statistics (without increasing the acquisition duration) and integrate motion information before, during, or after the reconstruction process. Here, we provide an overview of how motion is managed to overcome respiratory motion in PET/CT images. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams &Wilkins.


Joly Condette C.,INERIS | Khorsi-Cauet H.,INERIS | Morliere P.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Zabijak L.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | And 3 more authors.
PloS one | Year: 2014

The epithelium's barrier function is crucial for maintaining homeostasis and preventing the passage of food antigens and luminal bacteria. This function is essentially subserved by tight junctions (TJs), multiprotein complexes located in the most apical part of the lateral membrane. Some gastrointestinal disease states are associated with elevated intestinal permeability to macromolecules. In a study on rats, we determined the influence of chronic, daily ingestion of chlorpyrifos (CPF, a pesticide that crosses the placental barrier) during pre- and postnatal periods on intestinal permeability and TJ characteristics in the pups. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was used as a marker of paracellular transport and mucosal barrier dysfunction. Pups were gavaged with FITC-dextran solution and blood samples were collected every 30 min for 400 min and analyzed spectrofluorimetrically. At sacrifice, different intestinal segments were resected and prepared for analysis of the transcripts (qPCR) and localization (using immunofluorescence) of ZO-1, occludin and claudins (scaffolding proteins that have a role in the constitution of TJs). In rats that had been exposed to CPF in utero and after birth, we observed a progressive increase in FITC-dextran passage across the epithelial barrier from 210 to 325 min at day 21 after birth (weaning) but not at day 60 (adulthood). At both ages, there were significant changes in intestinal TJ gene expression, with downregulation of ZO-1 and occludin and upregulation of claudins 1 and 4. In some intestinal segments, there were changes in the cellular localization of ZO-1 and claudin 4 immunostaining. Lastly, bacterial translocation to the spleen was also observed. The presence of CPF residues in food may disturb epithelial homeostasis in rats. Changes in TJ protein expression and localization may be involved in gut barrier dysfunction in this model. Uncontrolled passage of macromolecules and bacteria across the intestinal epithelium may be a risk factor for digestive inflammatory diseases.


Condette C.J.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Khorsi-Cauet H.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Morliere P.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Morliere P.,Amiens University Hospital | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

The epithelium's barrier function is crucial for maintaining homeostasis and preventing the passage of food antigens and luminal bacteria. This function is essentially subserved by tight junctions (TJs), multiprotein complexes located in the most apical part of the lateral membrane. Some gastrointestinal disease states are associated with elevated intestinal permeability to macromolecules. In a study on rats, we determined the influence of chronic, daily ingestion of chlorpyrifos (CPF, a pesticide that crosses the placental barrier) during pre- and postnatal periods on intestinal permeability and TJ characteristics in the pups. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was used as a marker of paracellular transport and mucosal barrier dysfunction. Pups were gavaged with FITC-dextran solution and blood samples were collected every 30 min for 400 min and analyzed spectrofluorimetrically. At sacrifice, different intestinal segments were resected and prepared for analysis of the transcripts (qPCR) and localization (using immunofluorescence) of ZO-1, occludin and claudins (scaffolding proteins that have a role in the constitution of TJs). In rats that had been exposed to CPF in utero and after birth, we observed a progressive increase in FITC-dextran passage across the epithelial barrier from 210 to 325 min at day 21 after birth (weaning) but not at day 60 (adulthood). At both ages, there were significant changes in intestinal TJ gene expression, with downregulation of ZO-1 and occludin and upregulation of claudins 1 and 4. In some intestinal segments, there were changes in the cellular localization of ZO-1 and claudin 4 immunostaining. Lastly, bacterial translocation to the spleen was also observed. The presence of CPF residues in food may disturb epithelial homeostasis in rats. Changes in TJ protein expression and localization may be involved in gut barrier dysfunction in this model. Uncontrolled passage of macromolecules and bacteria across the intestinal epithelium may be a risk factor for digestive inflammatory diseases. © 2014 Joly Condette et al.

Discover hidden collaborations