Jules Verne University of Picardy

Dreuil-lès-Amiens, France

Jules Verne University of Picardy

Dreuil-lès-Amiens, France
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Temmar M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Temmar M.,Amiens University Medical Center | Temmar M.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Liabeuf S.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 17 more authors.
Journal of Hypertension | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: Increased arterial stiffness and vascular calcification have been recognized as important predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. METHOD: In order to examine the precise temporal link between aortic stiffness and cardiovascular risk at the earliest stages of chronic kidney disease, we studied a cohort of 150 patients with chronic kidney disease (52 stage 2/3 patients, 51 stage 4/5 patients and 47 stage 5D patients). Each patient underwent a plain, lateral lumbar radiograph and an abdominal and thoracic multislice spiral computer tomography scan in order to identify and quantify aortic and coronary calcifications. Pulse wave velocity was used as a measure of arterial stiffness. RESULTS: Regardless of the disease stage, patients with chronic kidney disease had higher adjusted pulse wave velocity than controls with preserved renal function (14.6 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 1.7 m/s, respectively; P < 0.0001). Regarding aortic calcification, there was a gradual but significant rise in later chronic kidney disease stages. A similar trend was found for coronary calcification. In a multivariate analysis only age, mean arterial pressure, diabetes and the aortic calcification score were independent determinants of higher pulse wave velocity. CONCLUSION: We found that both vascular stiffness and vascular calcification appear early in patients with chronic kidney disease, but only vascular calcification worsens as the disease progresses. The increase of vascular stiffness in adult patients with chronic kidney disease seems to be more related to age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and vascular calcification than to uremic toxicity. © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | Jules Verne University of Picardy, Ghent University and Federal University of São Paulo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Jornal brasileiro de nefrologia : 'orgao oficial de Sociedades Brasileira e Latino-Americana de Nefrologia | Year: 2014

Experimental studies have suggested that indoxyl sulfate (IS), a protein-bound uremic toxin, may be involved in the development of renal osteodystrophy.evaluate the association between IS levels and biochemical parameters related to mineral metabolism and bone histomorphometry in a cohort of pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.This is a post-hoc analysis of an observational study evaluating the association between coronary calcification and bone biopsy findings in 49 patients (age: 52 10 years; 67% male; estimated glomerular filtration rate: 36 17 ml/min). Serum levels of IS were measured.Patients at CKD stages 2 and 3 presented remarkably low bone formation rate. Patients at CKD stages 4 and 5 presented significantly higher osteoid volume, osteoblast and osteoclast surface, bone fibrosis volume and bone formation rate and a lower mineralization lag time than CKD stage 2 and 3 patients. We observed a positive association between IS levels on one hand and the bone formation rate, osteoid volume, osteoblast surface and bone fibrosis volume on the other. Multivariate regression models confirmed that the associations between IS levels and osteoblast surface and bone fibrosis volume were both independent of demographic and biochemical characteristics of the study population. A similar trend was observed for the bone formation rate.Our findings demonstrated that IS is positively associated with bone formation rate in pre-dialysis CKD patients.


Pelletier A.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Delanaud S.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Decima P.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Thuroczy G.,INERIS | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2013

The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on the control of body energy balance in developing organisms have not been studied, despite the involvement of energy status in vital physiological functions. We examined the effects of chronic RF-EMF exposure (900 MHz, 1 V m-1) on the main functions involved in body energy homeostasis (feeding behaviour, sleep and thermoregulatory processes). Thirteen juvenile male Wistar rats were exposed to continuous RF-EMF for 5 weeks at 24 °C of air temperature (Ta) and compared with 11 non-exposed animals. Hence, at the beginning of the 6th week of exposure, the functions were recorded at Ta of 24 °C and then at 31 °C. We showed that the frequency of rapid eye movement sleep episodes was greater in the RF-EMF-exposed group, independently of Ta (+42. 1 % at 24 °C and +31. 6 % at 31 °C). The other effects of RF-EMF exposure on several sleep parameters were dependent on Ta. At 31 °C, RF-EMF-exposed animals had a significantly lower subcutaneous tail temperature (-1. 21 °C) than controls at all sleep stages; this suggested peripheral vasoconstriction, which was confirmed in an experiment with the vasodilatator prazosin. Exposure to RF-EMF also increased daytime food intake (+0. 22 g h-1). Most of the observed effects of RF-EMF exposure were dependent on Ta. Exposure to RF-EMF appears to modify the functioning of vasomotor tone by acting peripherally through α-adrenoceptors. The elicited vasoconstriction may restrict body cooling, whereas energy intake increases. Our results show that RF-EMF exposure can induce energy-saving processes without strongly disturbing the overall sleep pattern. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Gignon M.,University of Paris 13 | Gignon M.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | Gignon M.,Amiens University Hospital | Havet E.,Jules Verne University of Picardy | And 11 more authors.
Workplace Health and Safety | Year: 2015

This study investigated addictive substance use by French medical students. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 255 participants randomly selected from 1,021 second- to sixth-year medical students. Questionnaires were self-administered and included questions on sociodemographic characteristics, mental health, and alcohol (The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT test]), tobacco (Fagerstrom test), and illegal substance consumption (Cannabis Abuse Screening Test [CAST test]). The AUDIT scores indicated that 11% of the study participants were at risk for addiction and 21% were high-risk users. Tobacco dependence was strong or very strong for 12% of the participants. The CAST score showed that 5% of cannabis users needed health care services. Cannabis users were also more likely than non-users to fail their medical school examinations (89% vs. 39%, p < .01). One quarter of medical student participants (n = 41) had used other illegal drugs, and 10% of study participants had considered committing suicide during the previous 12 months. Psychoactive substance consumption by French medical students requires preventive measures, screening, and health care services. Copyright © 2015 The Author(s).


PubMed | University of Paris 13, Jules Verne University of Picardy and Jules Verne University of Picardy Amiens University Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Workplace health & safety | Year: 2015

This study investigated addictive substance use by French medical students. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 255 participants randomly selected from 1,021 second- to sixth-year medical students. Questionnaires were self-administered and included questions on sociodemographic characteristics, mental health, and alcohol (The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT test]), tobacco (Fagerstrom test), and illegal substance consumption (Cannabis Abuse Screening Test [CAST test]). The AUDIT scores indicated that 11% of the study participants were at risk for addiction and 21% were high-risk users. Tobacco dependence was strong or very strong for 12% of the participants. The CAST score showed that 5% of cannabis users needed health care services. Cannabis users were also more likely than non-users to fail their medical school examinations (89% vs. 39%, p<.01). One quarter of medical student participants (n=41) had used other illegal drugs, and 10% of study participants had considered committing suicide during the previous 12 months. Psychoactive substance consumption by French medical students requires preventive measures, screening, and health care services.

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