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Gavrish Y.,JSC NIIEFA
2014 20th International Workshop on Beam Dynamics and Optimization, BDO 2014 | Year: 2014

Development of the particle accelerators and accelerator-based electro-physical structures are among the main directions of the scientific research at the Efremov Institute. A whole range of accelerator devices was developed in the Institute - designed, manufactured and installed in scientific, producing and health organizations are over 300 of different kinds of accelerators - cyclotrons, linacs, direct-action accelerators and neutron generators. © 2014 IEEE. Source


Volodin A.,JSC NIIEFA | Kuznetcov V.,JSC NIIEFA | Davydov V.,JSC NIIEFA | Kokoulin A.,JSC NIIEFA | And 10 more authors.
Fusion Engineering and Design | Year: 2015

The current ITER design involves beryllium and tungsten as plasma facing materials for in-vessel components. Due to a high number of operating cycles and to the expected surface heat loads, thermal fatigue is one of the most damaging mechanisms for the plasma facing components (PFCs) of the ITER machine. Therefore, it is essential to perform an assessment of the behavior of PFCs under cycling heat loads to demonstrate the fitness for purpose of the selected technologies.This article summarizes the features of high heat flux facilities designed and constructed in the Efremov Institute for the performance of high heat flux (HHF) tests under ITER procurements as well as related R&D works.The TSEFEY-M facility was commissioned in 1994. The main purpose of this facility is thermal fatigue testing of mock-ups with various plasma-facing materials (carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFC), tungsten, beryllium, etc.) and with various cooling agents (water or gas).The ITER divertor test facility (IDTF) was created in the framework of ITER project, specifically for the HHF tests of the vertical targets (inner and outer) and domes of the ITER divertor.After commissioning in 2008, the IDTF facility was qualified in 2012-2013 for HHF tests of ITER PFCs. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Veresov O.L.,JSC NIIEFA | Grigorenko S.V.,JSC NIIEFA | Zuev Yu.V.,JSC NIIEFA | Kuzhlev A.N.,JSC NIIEFA | And 6 more authors.
24th Russian Particle Accelerator Conference, RuPAC 2014 | Year: 2014

The results of bench tests of an RF-frequency deuteron accelerator (RFQ) with an output energy of 1 MeV and operating frequency of 433 MHz are presented. The paper describes specific features of the RFQ construction and assembly, RF power supply system and test procedures. Parameters of the facility when operating with a beam energy analyzer and Be target are given. © 2014 CC-BY-3.0 and by the respective authors. Source


Kuznetsov V.,JSC NIIEFA | Gorbenko A.,JSC NIIEFA | Davydov V.,JSC NIIEFA | Kokoulin A.,JSC NIIEFA | And 7 more authors.
Fusion Engineering and Design | Year: 2014

The ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) was designed for the high heat flux tests of outer vertical targets, inner vertical targets and domes of the ITER divertor. This facility was created in the Efremov Institute under the Procurement Arrangement 1.7.P2D.RF (high heat flux tests of the plasma facing units of the ITER divertor). The heat flux is generated by an electron-beam system (EBS), 800 kW power and 60 kV maximum accelerating voltage. The component to be tested is mounted on a manipulator in the vacuum chamber capable of testing objects up to 2.5 m long and 1.5 m wide. The pressure in the vacuum chamber is about 3*10-3 Pa. The parameters of the cooling system and the water quality (deionized water) are similar to the cooling conditions of the ITER divertor. The integrated control system regulates all IDTF subsystems and data acquisition from all diagnostic devices, such as pyrometers, IR-cameras, video cameras, flow, pressure and temperature sensors. Started in 2008, the IDTF was commissioned in 2012 with the testing the outer vertical full-scale prototypes and the completion of the PA 1.7.P2D.RF task. This paper details the main characteristics of the IDTF. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Source

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