County Council of Jonkoping

Jönköping, Sweden

County Council of Jonkoping

Jönköping, Sweden
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Peterson A.,County Council of Jonkoping | Peterson A.,Health Science University | Gudbjornsdottir S.,Sahlgrenska Academy | Schioler L.,Gothenburg University | And 3 more authors.
Quality Management in Health Care | Year: 2015

Background: Since 1996, the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) enabled health care providers to monitor their clinical performance over time and compare it with the national average. All health systems of Swedish county councils report data. By 2014, the NDR included data from 360 000 patients. Comparisons among county councils show significant variations in clinical outcomes and in adherence to evidence-based national guidelines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether and how a quality improvement collaborative could influence clinical practice and outcomes. Methods: Twenty-three diabetes teams from all over Sweden, both primary care units and internal medicine departments, joined a quality improvement collaborative. The project was inspired by the Breakthrough Collaborative Model and lasted for 20 months. Evaluation data were collected from the teams' final reports and the NDR throughout the study period. Results and Conclusion: The teams reported improved patient outcomes significantly compared with the national average for systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein levels. In contrast, glycated hemoglobin A1c levels deteriorated in the whole NDR population. Five themes of changes in practice were tested and implemented. Success factors included improved teamwork, with active use of register data, and testing new ideas and learning from others. © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Andersson P.O.,Linköping University | Karlsson J.-E.,County Council of Jonkoping | Karlsson J.-E.,Linköping University | Landberg E.,Linköping University | And 2 more authors.
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2015

Background: There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test. Methods: This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7 days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30 days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3 years. Results: Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the ≥ 15 ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50 ng/L. Troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L was correlated to age ≥65 years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3 years. Conclusions: A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65 years. For patients older than 65-70 years, a higher decision limit than ≥15 ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP. © 2015 Andersson et al.


Andersson P.O.,Linköping University | Karlsson J.-E.,County Council of Jonkoping | Karlsson J.-E.,Linköping University | Landberg E.,Linköping University | And 2 more authors.
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2015

Background: There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test. Methods: This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7 days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30 days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3 years. Results: Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the ≥ 15 ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50 ng/L. Troponin T ≥ 15 ng/L was correlated to age ≥65 years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3 years. Conclusions: A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65 years. For patients older than 65-70 years, a higher decision limit than ≥15 ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP. © 2015 Andersson et al.


There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7 days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30 days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T 15 ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T 15 ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3 years.Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the 15 ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50 ng/L. Troponin T 15 ng/L was correlated to age 65 years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3 years.A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65 years. For patients older than 65-70 years, a higher decision limit than 15 ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

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