Helsinki, Finland
Helsinki, Finland

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Embodiments of nanoparticle systems and methods of producing nanoparticle systems configured to target particular cellular activity in an animal or human including a signaling pathway expression of mammal cellular activity and treat cells producing the targeted cellular activity by exposing the nanoparticle system to electromagnetic radiation in a predetermined range of wavelengths. Other embodiments may be described and claimed.


A system and method for scalable multifunctional network communication between presentation devices and service providers are disclosed. A group of consumer premise equipment (CPE) units are coupled to the presentation devices, and a headend control computer receives upstream messages from the CPE units and for sending downstream messages to the CPE units. A group of service provider control subsystems interface between the headend control computer and the service providers. The head end control computer receives messages from the CPE units and transports them to the service provider control subsystems, and the headend control computer receives messages from the service provider control subsystems and transports them to the CPE units.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 598.94K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant This SBIR Phase II proposal will enhance the pace of development and support the eventual commercialization of a self administration vapor inhalation chamber system for the intrapulmonary delivery to rats of tetrahydrocannabinol THC the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis Cannabis remains the most popular illicit psychoactive drug used in the US Some of year olds have tried cannabis at least once in their lifetime and of year olds have used cannabis in the past month There are more people in the US who meet criteria for cannabis dependence than have used cocaine in the past month or ever tried heroin It is of further concern that the use of cannabis under medical marijuana laws continues to expand Further mechanistic understanding of how dependence of THC develops and the discovery of therapeutics is an increasingly critical goal yet progress has been slowed by the failure of rats to readily self administer THC by the traditional intravenous route The studies in this project seek to further refine our instrumentation to create a reliable rat model of THC self administration via vapor inhalation Studies under Specific Aim will assess the pharmacokinetic distribution of THC as well as effects of intrapulmonary exposure on thermoregulation locomotor activity catalepsy and analgesia to determine necessary exposure parameters The goal is to achieve well controlled exposure under a broad range of plasma THC levels which range from threshold of behavioral effects to doses which can produce dependence with repeated exposure Studies under Aim will establish dependence on THC as well as operant self administration using delivery of volatilized THC as a reinforcer Studies under Aim will test specific instrumentation design changes dictated by Aims and as well as by the preliminary data detailed in the Research Strategy PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Use of marijuana and therefore the main active constituent tetrahydrocannabinol THC for recreational and therapeutic purposes continues to expand as additional US States legalize medical and recreational use Scientific understanding of compulsive use of and dependence on marijuana has been hampered by a failure of rats to self administer THC intravenously at robust levels The present study will proposes research to enhance the pace of development and commercialization of our self administration vapor inhalation chamber system and create an intrapulmonary self administration model in rats which will support future investigations into THC dependence


A method of handling a graphical user interface of a computing device includes a display and a touch screen is described. The method for the computing device includes displaying a user interface element on the display, opening a menu structure on a side of the element by a touch on the touch screen, and activating a menu option from the menu structure by positioning the menu option within a selection area of the menu structure by a touch. An apparatus that is configured to perform the method and a computer program product comprising instructions to perform the method are also described.


After smashing through its original crowdfunding goal of $380,000 in just over two hours, eventually raising $1.8 million before the campaign closed in December, perhaps we shouldn’t be too surprised to see the Jolla Tablet return to Indiegogo. To keep things interesting (and, presumably, a little more competitive), the iPad alternative, which runs Jolla’s Sailfish OS, is now being offered in a 64GB version, along with a few other updated specs. These include a bigger battery (4450mAh, up from 4300mAh) and limited support for microSD cards up to 128GB. The latter means that you’ll be able to use microSD cards for back-ups and extra storage, but, due to Microsoft’s licensing limitations and to keep with Jolla’s ‘open’ ethos, cards that are over 32GB and formatted for use in the Jolla Tablet will not be readable by Windows computers or other devices, such as cameras, phones or tablets, that sport microSDXC support. “We feel that this suits best with our community’s wishes and Jolla’s values,” says the company. A couple of other changes see the tablet’s display now being fully laminated, and the addition of gyroscope and compass sensors. However, the proximity sensor that was previously touted will not be included. Otherwise, on the hardware front, the Jolla Tablet is aiming to square up to the iPad Mini 2, with a 7.9-inch screen, sporting a resolution of 2048 x 1563. Inside, it’s powered by a 1.8GHz quad-core processor, has 2GB of RAM and includes a 5MP rear camera. Meanwhile, this time around, you have until the end of February to back the iPad alternative built by the same team of (largely) ex-Nokians who are also behind the Jolla phone. Talking of which, the company is offering a special phone+tablet bundle as one of the available perks on its Indiegogo campaign, should you want to go all in on Sailfish OS. That’s the operating system that rose from the ashes of Nokia’s Meego OS, the company’s intended successor to Symbian before it jumped off a burning platform and into Microsoft’s arms. Of note to previous backers of the Jolla Tablet, for a new perk of $25 you can upgrade to the new 64GB version. Here is a full list of Jolla Tablet ‘perks’ on Indiegogo:


News Article | March 2, 2015
Site: thenextweb.com

Jolla, which last hit our radar when it smashed the crowfunding target for its Sailfish OS tablet, has revealed it’s building a secure version of the OS. It’s teaming up with another Finnish firm, SSH Communications Security, to create Sailfish Secure. The companies believe there’s a need for the project as there are no European alternatives to Android and other US-based operating systems for secure communication. Details on how Sailfish Secure will work are pretty thin on the ground at the moment but Jolla says it expects the project will be ready to go next year. Sailfish is an open-source project that spun out of Nokia’s MeeGo initiative. It can run Android apps as well as its own native software. Jolla says its approach with Sailfish Secure will adapt according to local needs and won’t be dependent on particular hardware. The level of interest in secure smartphone platforms like Blackphone suggests Jolla could be on to a winner, especially with the continuing reverberations from Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA surveillance programmes.


News Article | March 3, 2015
Site: techcrunch.com

Finland’s Jolla, the plucky startup that’s built its own mobile OS, called Sailfish, atop the Mer open source project, is showing off its forthcoming, crowdsourced tablet here at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. It’s the follow up to Jolla’s first device, the eponymous Jolla smartphone, which was released at the end of 2013. So far the Jolla Tablet Indiegogo campaign has pulled in more than $2.2 million from more than 18,500 backers, far exceeding the original funding target. Compatibility with Android gives the underdog Sailfish a line in to mobile’s biggest app ecosystem — so Jolla can offer mobile users an alternative to Android that nevertheless gives them access to Android apps (albeit not via Google Play). The 8-inch Jolla Tablet, which the company is continuing to crowdfund (currently priced at $249), is running Sailfish 2.0 — the first major upgrade to its software platform since launch. TechCrunch sat down with Jolla co-founder Marc Dillon to get a closer look at the tablet and OS update — check out the video to see Dillon demoing the new UI. Dillon also told us that more Jolla devices are planned, hinting at a sequel smartphone, albeit he said it’s not making any specific announcements about its roadmap at this point. So what’s coming in Sailfish 2.0? Most obviously Jolla’s platform gets another string to its bow to make the most of the small tablet form factor — so there are thoughtful touches such as a Qwerty keyboard that splits into two in landscape orientation so that you can type with two thumbs without having to put the slate down; and a customizable quick settings bar located a swipe away from the homescreen, next to Jolla’s aggregated notifications feed. There are also some themed modes which can be toggled via a down-swipe from the top of the screen. Here you can, for instance, switch between a work set up of the tablet with apps like email and calendar foregrounded, to an after hours view with the daily grind tucked out of sight. But by far the biggest upgrade with Sailfish 2.0 is how Jolla has pared back and simplified Sailfish’s gesture based UI. This is a key change. Reviews of Jolla’s smartphone had identified a problematic learning curve and sometimes confusing navigation. And while Jolla has touted Sailfish’s newness and ‘otherness’ as a core part of its differentiation mission, to offer choice in a marketplace dominated by Android and iOS, it also needs to offer something people are comfortable using. Jolla has clearly been listening and is now iterating. Sailfish 2.0 pares interactions back to a few core gestures, such as swiping up anywhere to get to all apps, or a side swipe to peek at or go back to the homescreen. It’s also possible to continuously swipe to cycle through the various content screens. Meanwhile actions supported by the application covers — aka the small cards representing open/live apps on the Sailfish homescreen — have also been simplified, so they are less matryoshka-like in terms of what users can do with them. In short, Jolla seems to have realised that less is more — and difference shouldn’t be difficult. This is definitely progress. It has also added a new content screen to Sailfish 2.0 that can be swiped in from the homescreen which it’s calling a “partner space”. It’s demoing this with Deezer on the tablet, as as example, but does not yet have any partners to announce. It’s had something similar on its smartphone, offering co-branded content from the likes of Rovio, for instance. A tablet-based partner space is obviously more generously proportioned than what can fit on a smartphone — and can contain a whole carousel of content. “Jolla is very eager to take industrial partners right now,” said Dillon, discussing how it’s hoping the partner space feature will spark more industry interest in its platform and hardware. “Maybe I would like to buy a package from my operator or a retailer that includes the service, the cellular service or data, that also includes my favorite content packages, also includes the device, so we can bundle all of those togethers and give a premium place on the UI that’s right next to the homescreen where my favorite application, favorite content, favorite service bundle is always right available.” Dillon said Sailfish 2.0 will be rolling out when the tablet launches — likely at the end of Q2 this year. The 2.0 update also brings stability and core performance improvements to its platform (“I think we’re doing Android better than Android does now, with the multitasking and the multiple windows”), along with support for Intel CPUs, which will expand the device types Sailfish can reach. Who has been pre-ordering the Jolla tablet so far? Backers are “really varied”, according to Dillon. The biggest group were “people who wanted to see something that was independent”. “That was actually the number one reason that people backed us,” he said, adding: “About half of the people had an existing tablet so they were wanting to replace an existing tablet. Only about around half had a Jolla phone, so we did have a lot of people that came out of the box to get this device. “This seemed to be a very good fit for us,” he added, talking about the decision to make a tablet. “You have to move your whole life to a mobile phone so a tablet is more of an elective kind of purchase. A lot of people use them to either consume content, or to work, or to communicate.” “This is the first Sailfish tablet. This is the first tablet that doesn’t have an American operating system. It’s the first tablet that’s not dominated by a one company strategy.” While Sailfish is built on an open source core, the Sailfish UI itself remains proprietary. But Jolla is aiming to move in a fully open sourced direction — hence its call yesterday for more partners to join the Sailfish Alliance. Intel and SSH Communications are the first two it’s talking about — the latter helping it build a forthcoming hardened version of the OS, called Sailfish Secure. “I definitely envisage it in the future to be fully open source. At the moment Sailfish is not. It’s powered by open. We work in the open in a lot of places,” he said. “When we work with our partners we can give them the source code to absolutely everything. So that’s one huge advantage… Getting fully open is going to require this Sailfish Alliance, so getting some more companies and partners on board. Then we can basically release everything. “What we don’t want is any single points of control. We want a group of companies that come together, that co-operate, that maybe have different agendas, maybe are even in some kinds of competition with each other, but can leverage one platform in order to do that — instead of closing down the walls and saying this is our strategy and we’re going to go as hard as we can until we fall. Because monopolies always fall.”


News Article | March 5, 2015
Site: thenextweb.com

Jolla’s first smartphone was a runaway success for the Finnish company founded by ex-Nokia employees in 2011, so at the end of last year, it decided to capitalize on that momentum and announced its first tablet. The Jolla Tablet, which runs the same custom SailfishOS as the smartphone, hasn’t gone on sale yet, but it will next month in a number of markets. I spent a little time taking a poke around the device at MWC 2015 this week to see what it had to offer. The Jolla Tablet might only cost $249, but it’s not skimping too much on the hardware. Under-the-hood there’s a 1.8GHz quad-core processor, 5-megapixel camera, 2-megapixel front camera and 2GB of RAM to keep things ticking over nicely. The rear camera is placed along the edge of the device, rather than in the middle. While not top of the range specs, they’re respectable enough for most tablet use and should provide a capable enough experience. From my testing, everything flowed smoothly and there wasn’t any lag or unresponsiveness in switching apps or swiping at the screen. However, the quality of the 7.85-inch, 2,084 x 1,536 pixel display is particularly worth calling out. Even on the show floor under the bright lights of MWC, images were sharp and bright, rather than washed out and hard to see. Obviously, we’ve not had the chance to check it out in direct sunlight, but I’d be expecting good things based on this test. The design of the Jolla Tablet is somehow refreshing. I’m not a huge fan of overly square-edged devices – the new Xperia M4 Aqua, for example, feels a little uncomfortable to me – but the rounded edges of the Jolla Tablet make it easy to hold and the rear cover helps with that too. Both sides of the device are a bit of a fingerprint magnet though. Officially it measures up at 203 mm x 137 mm x 8.3 mm and weighs 384 grams, making it around 40 – 50 grams heavier than an iPad mini 3, and 8mm thicker. In reality, these aren’t differences that are going to matter all that much. While there’s no hardware controls on the front of the device, you’ll find the volume rocker and power buttons along the top edge, along with a headphone socket. The unit I used was running a newer version of the Sailfish OS than is currently available for the Jolla smartphone, and with it comes a number of worthwhile improvements. While it’s Linux-based, but not an Android fork, you won’t be totally lost. You will need to take a bit of time to learn how to get around if you’ve not used it before though. With the first version of the OS, that was a problem, it could be tricky to navigate and harder to discover some features than necessary. Now, following the update, there’s new gesture controls to make it easier to find your way around and between apps. As with other platforms, swiping from the left or right will move you between home screens and your notification panels, while swiping up from the bottom will take you to your list of installed apps, for example. You will need to learn all the new gestures though, as there’s no on screen buttons (or hardware controls) on the front of the device. Swiping down from the top allows you to put the tablet into different modes, like silent, party, driving, etc. You can get new apps from the Sailfish store, but can also install Android apps too – where necessary, these get emulated on-screen controls due to the lack of the back button you’d find on a regular Android device. Having only had a short time to play around with the device (and no opportunity to test the speakers, camera etc.) it’s a bit too early to form any final opinions about the capabilities of Jolla’s tablet. However, with hardware that feels good in the hands and looks a little different than its rivals, if it fares well in a more demanding test it could well be a viable alternative to mainstream Android tablets or iPads, providing you can get used to the OS. Read next: Jolla is building a secure version of its Sailfish OS as a rival to Android


News Article | January 30, 2015
Site: gigaom.com

A crowdfunded tablet with a unique operating system is back with a new option if you’re willing to pay for it. In December, the Jolla tablet closed its Indiegogo campaign with more than four times the initial funding goal, but the campaign is now open again, says CNET. The company — comprised of ex-Nokia employees — has the money to push forward on the original product, so that’s not a problem. Instead, it decided to offer a higher storage option for the tablet, which runs the Android-app compatible Sailfish OS. The Jolla tablet software is called Sailfish OS — that might not sound familiar, but maybe MeeGo might. Sailfish OS has its roots in MeeGo, the open-source mobile software effort backed by Intel, Nokia and others that was meant to challenge Apple iOS, Google Android and Microsoft Windows Phone. The original Jolla tablet was priced for the funding effort in tiers: $189 for the first group, $199 for the next thousand backers and $209 after that. All of those prices were for the same device configuration: A 1.8 GHz quad-core Intel processor, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, 7.9-inch 2048×1536 display and five-megapixel camera. What’s new is that for $249, Jolla is offering the tablet with twice the storage; you’ll get 64 GB of flash storage with the current campaign extension. Jolla expects the retail price for this model to be $299. So what if you backed the 32GB version last year? Don’t sweat it: Jolla has a simple upgrade path. Anyone who previously committed to the original model can upgrade to the 64GB tablet by adding $20 to their initial pledge. That’s well worth it for the early birds.


News Article | March 2, 2015
Site: www.zdnet.com

Jolla is reviving its hunt for hardware partners to make smartphones or tablets running its Sailfish OS. In an age of Android, the odds may seem to be stacked against Jolla, but two years since its inception, the small Finnish startup is still afloat and even has some wind in its sails after a crowdfunding campaign breathed life into its forthcoming tablet. Jolla announced today that shipments of its first tablet should begin in the second quarter of 2015, alongside the release of the 2.0 version of its Sailfish OS. Jolla's tablet uses Intel's Atom 3700 series as its application processor and so one of the features the new OS, which is available to other hardware makers to license, is support for Intel architecture. When Jolla emerged in 2012 after Nokia ditched work on the open-source MeeGo operating system, the company outlined ambitions to persuade ODMs, OEMs, internet companies and others to build devices that ran its OS. Companies that wanted to license its OS would do so through the Sailfish OS alliance. While Jolla did gain early support for that mission from Chinese retailer D.Phone, the alliance seemed to have taken a backseat to the launch of its first Sailfish OS smartphone, released last year. But with Sailfish OS 2.0 on the way, Intel on board, and a tablet in the works, Jolla says the Sailfish alliance is now ready to roll again. "The roadmap of Sailfish OS already from the beginning in 2012 has led the way to this point: Sailfish OS is now ready for licensing to OEMs and other partners," Antti Saarnio, co-founder of Jolla and the company's chairman, said. "We feel that Sailfish OS is the perfect platform for OEMs, content owners, m-commerce companies, and others to build differentiated mobile products. We are also very happy to work with Intel in planning for the Intel Atom x3 processor support for Sailfish OS," he added. The company is at MWC in Barcelona this week, likely scouting for potential members for its alliance. According to Jolla, Sailfish OS 2.0 offers several improvements on its predecessor, including better Android application compatibility, support for Intel Atom x3 architecture, a new UI, privacy enhancements, and updates to notifications and events views. The Sailfish OS 2.0 UI apparently also lends itself to digital content providers or mobile commerce applications. The company also has ambitions for the Sailfish OS to be used in the enterprise, today announcing plans to develop a version called 'Sailfish Secure' with Finnish security firm SSH Communications Security. The latter company's claim to fame is that its founder Tatu Ylönen is the father of the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol, which protects data in transit. The idea would be to become a European alternative to iOS, Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone, which Jolla reckons will be "ideal for government officials, corporations, and consumers." In other words, it will try and crack the regulated end of enterprise that Samsung is pursuing with Knox.

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