Zaragoza, Spain
Zaragoza, Spain

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Serrano A.,Joint Unit BIFI IQFR | Serrano A.,CSIC - Biological Research Center | Sebastian M.,Joint Unit BIFI IQFR | Arilla-Luna S.,Joint Unit BIFI IQFR | And 8 more authors.
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Proteins and Proteomics | Year: 2015

Prokaryotic FAD synthetases (FADSs) are bifunctional enzymes composed of two modules, the C-terminal module with ATP:riboflavin kinase (RFK) activity, and the N-terminus with ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT) activity. The FADS from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, CaFADS, forms transient oligomers during catalysis. These oligomers are stabilized by several interactions between the RFK and FMNAT sites from neighboring protomers, which otherwise are separated in the monomeric enzyme. Among these inter-protomer interactions, the salt bridge between E268 at the RFK site and R66 at the FMNAT-module is particularly relevant, as E268 is the catalytic base of the kinase reaction. Here we have introduced point mutations at R66 to analyze the impact of the salt-bridge on ligand binding and catalysis. Interestingly, these mutations have only mild effects on ligand binding and kinetic properties of the FMNAT-module (where R66 is located), but considerably impair the RFK activity turnover. Substitutions of R66 also modulate the ratio between monomeric and oligomeric species and modify the quaternary arrangement observed by single-molecule methods. Therefore, our data further support the cross-talk between the RFK- and FMNAT-modules of neighboring protomers in the CaFADS enzyme, and establish the participation of R66 in the modulation of the geometry of the RFK active site during catalysis. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Garcia-Fandino R.,Barcelona Institute for Research in Biomedicine | Garcia-Fandino R.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Bernado P.,Montpellier University | Ayuso-Tejedor S.,University of Zaragoza | And 5 more authors.
PLoS Computational Biology | Year: 2012

The early stages of the thermal unfolding of apoflavodoxin have been determined by using atomistic multi microsecond-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations complemented with a variety of experimental techniques. Results strongly suggest that the intermediate is reached very early in the thermal unfolding process and that it has the properties of an "activated" form of the native state, where thermal fluctuations in the loops break loop-loop contacts. The unrestrained loops gain then kinetic energy corrupting short secondary structure elements without corrupting the core of the protein. The MD-derived ensembles agree with experimental observables and draw a picture of the intermediate state inconsistent with a well-defined structure and characteristic of a typical partially disordered protein. Our results allow us to speculate that proteins with a well packed core connected by long loops might behave as partially disordered proteins under native conditions, or alternatively behave as three state folders. Small details in the sequence, easily tunable by evolution, can yield to one or the other type of proteins. © 2012 García-Fandino et al.

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