Joint Typhoon Warning Center

Pearl City, HI, United States

Joint Typhoon Warning Center

Pearl City, HI, United States
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News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Tropical Cyclone Ella is intensifying and NASA observed heavy rainfall in the storm. Ella is now expected to pass to the north of Fiji which is good news for the island nation. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew over intensifying Tropical Cyclone Ella in the South Pacific on May 10, 2017 at 2301 UTC (7:01 p.m. EDT). The satellite's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments showed bands of curved rainfall bands wrapping into the center of a well-defined center of circulation. GPM's DPR measured rain falling at a rate of over 231 mm (9.1 inches) per hour in an intense feeder band on Ella's eastern side. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, a 3-D view of Tropical Cyclone Ella was produced using GPM radar reflectivity data (DPR Ku Band). DPR showed that the highest storm tops around the intensifying tropical cyclone were located in intense storms in the feeder band on Ella's eastern side. Some of these powerful storms were found by GPM's DPR to reach altitudes above 15.5 km (9.6 miles). On May 11 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Ella's maximum sustained winds had increased to 70 knots (80 mph/129.6 kph).The center of Ella was located about 324 nautical miles northeast of Suva, Fiji near 13.7 degrees south latitude and 178.7 degrees west longitude. Ella was moving to the west at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph). Fiji has a strong wind warning in effect for Vanua Levu, Taveuni and nearby smaller islands and Northern Lau Group. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted that animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery showed Ella was a compact system with a small central dense overcast. Ella has tightly curved thunderstorm banding wrapping into a small microwave eye feature along the northwest edge of the central convection. JWTC forecasts that Ella will move west and stay to the north of Fiji. The storm is at peak intensity and will gradually weaken, until it dissipates within about four days.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The nineteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Pacific Ocean season formed and is now threatening Fiji. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the storm shortly after it developed. Tropical Cyclone Ella was tropical storm strength at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on May 9. It was located about 150 nautical miles west-southwest of Pago Pago, near 14.9 degrees south latitude and 173.6 degrees west longitude. Ella had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph/83 kph), and is not expected to reach hurricane force. Ella was moving to the west-northwest at a crawl of 2 knots (2.3 mph/3.7 kph). On May 9 at 0354 UTC (May 8 at 11:54 p.m. EDT) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of newly developed Tropical Cyclone Ella northeast of the island of Fiji. The imagery showed a consolidating system with flaring thunderstorm development around the center of circulation. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the environment is conducive for development with warm sea surface temperatures and low vertical wind shear. However, because Tropical Cyclone Donna is located to the west its outflow is impeding Ella's own outflow. A tropical cyclone needs outflow of air from the top of the system to maintain strength or strengthen. For updated forecasts and warnings from the Fiji Meteorological Service, visit: http://www. In three days, Ella is expected to move into an environment with high vertical wind shear which is expected to weaken the system as it approaches a landfall in Fiji.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

This island of Fiji appears to be "bookended" by tropical cyclones in imagery from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. Tropical Cyclone Donna is west of Fiji and newly developed Tropical Cyclone Ella has developed east of the island. On May 9 at 0354 UTC (May 8 at 11:54 p.m. EDT) ) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible-light image when it passed over Vanuatu NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image that showed Tropical Cyclones Donna west of Fiji and Ella northeast of the island in the South Pacific. Warnings are in effect in New Caledonia. New Caledonian warnings include a Cyclonic alert level 2 for the communities of Houaïlou, Kouaoua, Canala, Thio, Yaté, Ouvéa, Lifou and Maré, and Alert level 1 for the communities of Boulouparis, Païta, Dumbéa, Nouméa, du Mont-Dore, and the Île des Pins. For updated local forecasts, visit: http://www. . At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on Tuesday, May 9, 2017, Tropical Cyclone Donna's maximum sustained winds were near 103.6 mph (90 knots/166.7 kph) as it was moving to the southeast at 10.3 mph (9 knots/16.6 kph). It was centered near 20.5 degrees east latitude and 167.5 degrees east longitude, about 138 nautical miles north-northeast of Noumea, New Caledonia. Animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery depicts a rapidly weakening system with warming cloud tops. Satellite data showed a ragged eye. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that "Environmental conditions continue to deteriorate and will weaken the system significantly over the next 48 hours. An approaching trough (elongated area of low pressure) from the west is introducing strong westerly flow aloft, thus impeding the poleward exhaust channel and will steadily increase vertical wind shear throughout the forecast period. Donna is also drifting into cooler waters and this trend will continue along the forecast track." Donna is expected to begin transitioning into an extra-tropical system in the next day and is forecast to complete transition by sometime on May 11.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Tropical Cyclone Ella has large bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center and from the east of center in imagery from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. On May 11 at 0136 UTC (May 10 at 9:36 p.m. EDT) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible-light image of Tropical Cyclone Ella in the South Pacific. Although an eye wasn't visible in the VIIRS image, microwave satellite imagery revealed a well-defined eye about 20 nautical miles in diameter. In addition to visible imagery, animated multispectral satellite imagery showed developing thunderstorms with curved banding wrapping into the defined low level circulation center. At 0300 UTC on May 11 (11 p.m. EDT, May 10) Tropical Cyclone Ella's maximum sustained winds increased to near 63 mph (55 knots/102 kph) as it continued moving to the west at 2.3 mph (2 knots /3.7 kph). It was centered near 14.4 degrees east latitude and 177.0 degrees west longitude, about 358 nautical miles northeast of Suva, Fiji. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center said that "Environmental analysis indicates [Ella] is in an area of favorable sea surface temperatures and fair outflow, however, vertical wind shear is moderate (15 to 20 knots)." Ella has is expected to track to the southwest over the next 12 to 24 hours as an elongated area of low pressure or trough moves into the region and re-orients the steering flow. Ella is expected to weaken in three days as it approaches Fiji. Fiji Meteorological Service issued a gale warning remains for Vanua Levu, Taveuni and nearby smaller islands. A strong wind warning remains in effect for Lau and Lomaiviti group and the eastern part of Viti Levu.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Tropical Cyclone Donna continues to move through the South Pacific Ocean as a major hurricane. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured an image of a clear eye as the storm was located between the island nations of Vanuatu and New Caledonia. The GPM satellite found that the powerful hurricane was generating very high amounts of rainfall. Over the weekend tropical cyclone Donna dropped very heavy rain over Vanuatu as it moved toward the west of the islands. Donna had intensified and had maximum sustained winds of 115 knots (132 mph) on Monday morning, May 8. This made it the equivalent of a category four on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Vanuatu is a South Pacific Ocean nation made up of about 80 islands. New Caledonia is a French territory made up of dozens of islands that lie southwest of Vanuatu. As Tropical Cyclone Donna was intensifying the GPM core observatory satellite had two excellent views of the storm on succeeding days. When GPM flew over Donna on May 6, 2017 at 0146 UTC (May 5 at 9:46 p.m. EDT) the tropical cyclone was getting organized. The following day on May 7 at 1411 UTC (10:11 a.m. EDT) GPM showed that Donna was very well organized and had a well-defined eye. GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) data showed that Vanuatu was being drenched with bands of very intense rain to the east of Donna's center. DPR showed that precipitation was falling at a rate of over 189 mm (7.4 inches) per hour in the eastern side of Donna's eye wall. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Tropical Cyclone Donna's rainfall structure was examined using data from GPM's radar (DPR Ku Band). GPM's DPR data was made into a 3-D view of the tropical cyclone's radar reflectivity. GPM's data swath revealed a cross section of rainfall through the eastern side of the tropical cyclone. GPM showed that some storm top heights were reaching altitudes above 14.3 km (8.9 mile) in tall storms in the eastern eye wall. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. On May 8 at 02:50 UTC (May 7 at 10:50 p.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Donna. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard Aqua captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Donna that showed the eye of the storm between New Caledonia and Vanuatu. At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Donna's maximum sustained winds were near 115 knots (132 mph/213 kph) making it a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. It was centered near 17.5 degrees south latitude and 165.1 degrees east longitude, about 183 nautical miles west of Port Vila, Vanuatu. Donna was moving to the south-southeast at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph). The Vanuatu National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) advised residents that Red Alert is active for Sanma, Malampa and Shefa provinces and a Yellow Alert is now in effect for the Tafea province. For updated forecasts for Vanuatu, visit: http://www. . New Caledonia Meteorological Service continues to issue warnings on Donna. Updates can be found at: http://www. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) predicts that Tropical Cyclone Donna has reached its peak intensity and will weaken as it heads toward the south-southeast over the next few days. Donna is expected to still be a powerful hurricane as it passes close to the east of New Caledonia. After May 9, the storm is forecast to move into an area with cooler sea surface temperatures and increased wind shear that are expected to weaken it quickly.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Donna as it was being sheared apart by winds southeast of New Caledonia. An infrared image taken May 10 at 11:55 UTC (7:55 a.m. EDT), from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite showed cloud top temperatures of the dying storm. Strongest thunderstorms with cloud tops so high in the troposphere they were as cold as minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 degrees Celsius) were pushed to the southeast of the center from northwesterly wind shear. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final warning on Donna today, May 10 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT). At that time, Donna's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 35 knots (40 mph/62 kph) and it was weakening. It was located about 116 nautical miles east-southeast of Noumea, New Caledonia, near 22.9 degrees south latitude and 168.0 degrees east longitude. Donna was moving southeast and is dissipating.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a night-time image of Tropical Cyclone Carlos using infrared light that showed the storm was being stretched out. Carlos is being adversely affected by the Westerlies. The Westerlies are a semi-permanent belt of prevailing westerly winds in the mid-latitudes that are found in both the temperate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. On February 9 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Carlos in the Southern Indian Ocean. Infrared imagery detects heat. The VIIRS image showed the thunderstorms around the center of circulation has become more elongated from east to west. Carlos has now moved further into the Westerlies, which have caused the elongation. The winds affecting Carlos are battering the tropical cyclone at a speed between 34.5 mph (30 knots /55.5 kph) and 46 mph (40 knots/74 kph). On Feb. 10 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Tropical Storm Carlos' maximum sustained winds were near 51.7 mph (45 knots/83.3 kph). Carlos' winds peaked on February 9. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expects Carlos to continue weakening. Carlos was centered near 28.5 degrees south latitude and 60.8 degrees east longitude, about 502 nautical miles southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Carlos was moving to the southeast at 17 mph (15 knots/28 kph). JTWC forecasters expect Carlos to rapidly erode, then dissipate by Sunday, February 12 because of increasing vertical wind shear and movement over cooler sea surface temperatures.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The fifth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season formed today, February 13 as NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of the storm. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of newly developed Tropical Cyclone Dineo in the Mozambique Channel on Feb. 13, 2017. Madagascar is to the east of the storm and Mozambique lies to the west. The image revealed strong storms around the center of circulation. On Feb. 13 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC), Dineo had maximum sustained winds near 46 mph (40 knots/74 mph) that are expected to strengthen over the next two days. Dineo was located about 48 nautical miles north-northwest of Europa Island. Dineo was crawling to the south-southwest at 2.3 mph (2 knots/3.7 kph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery shows "a consolidating low-level circulation center with deep convective banding (of thunderstorms) wrapping into the partially-exposed low-level center." The bulk of thunderstorms were over the eastern side of the storm. In one and a half days, atmospheric conditions are expected to allow the system to turn westward to west-northwestward where it is forecast to make landfall along the east coast of Mozambique on February 16.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Carlos as its center moved just to the west of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean. On Feb. 7 at 10:25 UTC (5:25 a.m. EST) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Carlos' clouds and showed the eastern quadrant over La Reunion. The storm appears more organized from the previous day, as wind shear has relaxed and allowed the center of circulation to become more defined. At 1500 UTC (10 am EST) Tropical Cyclone Carlos had maximum sustained winds dropped from 55 knots (64 mph / 102 kph) to 45 knots (52 mph/83 kph) as a result of the wind shear that was affecting it. However, warm sea surface temperatures are expected to allow the system to continue to strengthen. It was centered near 20.3 degrees south latitude and 54.0 degrees east longitude, just 59 nautical miles north of St. Denis, has tracked west-southwestward at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph). Meteo France is issuing advisories on Carlos. For forecast updates on La Reunion island, visit: http://www. . The Joint Typhoon Warning Center said that Tropical Cyclone Carlos will peak around 70 knots (80 mph/129.6 kph) on Feb. 9 as it begins curving to the southeast away from southeastern Madagascar in over the open ocean. Once Carlos' winds peak the storm is expected to start weakening quickly. For updated forecasts in English from the Meteo France La Reunion website, visit: http://www. . NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Carlos as its center moved just to the west of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean. On Feb. 7 at 10:25 UTC (5:25 a.m. EST) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Carlos' clouds and showed the eastern quadrant over La Reunion. The storm appears more organized from the previous day, as wind shear has relaxed and allowed the center of circulation to become more defined. At 1500 UTC (10 am EST) Tropical Cyclone Carlos had maximum sustained winds dropped from 55 knots (64 mph / 102 kph) to 45 knots (52 mph/83 kph) as a result of the wind shear that was affecting it. However, warm sea surface temperatures are expected to allow the system to continue to strengthen. It was centered near 20.3 degrees south latitude and 54.0 degrees east longitude, just 59 nautical miles north of St. Denis, has tracked west-southwestward at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph). Meteo France is issuing advisories on Carlos. For forecast updates on La Reunion island, visit: http://www. . The Joint Typhoon Warning Center said that Tropical Cyclone Carlos will peak around 70 knots (80 mph/129.6 kph) on Feb. 9 as it begins curving to the southeast away from southeastern Madagascar in over the open ocean. Once Carlos' winds peak the storm is expected to start weakening quickly. For updated forecasts in English from the Meteo France La Reunion website, visit: http://www. .


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NASA found heavy rainfall occurring in Tropical Cyclone Carlos as it continued to move between Madagascar and La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA's Terra satellite imagery revealed a concentrated storm, while the GPM core satellite measured rainfall rates within the storm. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory satellite flew above tropical cyclone Carlos on February 7, 2017 at 1056 UTC (5:56 a.m. EST). Carlos was moving past Reunion Island with maximum sustained winds estimated at 51.7 mph (45 knots/83.3 kph). GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) data show that rain bands west of Carlos' center were producing heavy rainfall. DPR measured a few downpours in the bands west of the Carlos' center of circulation dropping rain at a rate of over 120 mm (4.7 inches) per hour. GPM's radar (DPR Ku Band) found that a few storm tops were reaching heights of 11 km (8.8 miles). GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. On Feb. 8 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Tropical Storm Carlos' maximum sustained winds were near 51.7 mph (45 knots/83.3 kph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Carlos to strengthen to 69 mph (60 knots/111 kph) by Feb. 10. Carlos was centered near 22.8 degrees south latitude and 52.5 degrees east longitude, about 197 nautical miles southwest of St. Denis, La Reunion Island. Carlos was moving to the southwest at 6.9 mph (6 knots/11.1 kph). On Feb. 8 at 06:45 UTC (1:45 a.m. EST) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Carlos off Madagascar's east coast. The image showed strong thunderstorms over a compact low-level circulation center. Over the next two days tropical cyclone Carlos is predicted to follow a track between southern Madagascar and La Reunion. Then Carlos is predicted to re-curve toward the southeast. Vertical wind shear is expected to decrease during the next couple days so Carlos may intensify for a while. After a couple of days vertical wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures are expected to cause Carlos to gradually weaken.

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