Charlotte, NC, United States
Charlotte, NC, United States

Johnson C. Smith University is a private, co-ed, four-year research university of higher learning in the heart of Charlotte, North Carolina, United States. It is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church. JCSU is also a historically black college. JCSU offers an assortment of academic programs, aimed at ensuring that its graduates are prepared for success in the workforce. JCSU is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools , National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education , Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs , and Council on Social Work Accreditation . The school awards Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Work degrees to its graduates. The school also presents many internship opportunities for its students. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Lowe’s donated $500,000 to UNCF’s 37 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to award emergency student aid to financially needy graduating seniors. UNCF’s Emergency Student Aid (ESA) is a lifeline for UNCF-supported HBCU students with unanticipated needs or special circumstances such as the loss of a parent’s job. More than 200 seniors received aid during the 2016-17 academic year, allowing them to stay in school and on track to graduate. “College is quite expensive, but it is an investment that is certainly worthwhile,” said Quentin Perkins, a senior majoring in computer science at Florida Memorial University. “My parents are not able to pay for tuition out of pocket, so receiving this scholarship will enable me to continue to make progress toward my degree and to prepare for a career as an information technologist.” Since 2009, Lowe’s has partnered with UNCF’s emergency student aid program to provide $4.2 million in just-in-time aid. Thanks to Lowe’s long-term commitment to increasing post-secondary success for students at UNCF member schools, more than 1,700 students have been able to graduate on time. A UNCF partner since 1985, Lowe’s has donated more than $4.5 million to UNCF over the past three decades. “For more than 30 years, Lowe’s has been a vital partner in UNCF’s continuing mission to increase post-secondary access and success for students attending its member schools who need critical funding to earn their degrees,” said Dr. Michael Lomax, UNCF president and CEO. “We commend Lowe’s for their investment in better futures for students across the country.” "More than ever, a college education is foundational to building bright futures, inspiring leaders and stronger communities,” said James Frison, Lowe’s community relations director. “Scholarships and financial aid often provide the assistance needed for students having trouble paying for a degree so they continue and stay on the course. Lowe’s is proud to help make a college education a reality for many of our future leaders.” UNCF, the nation’s largest and most effective minority education assistance organization, launched ESA in 2009 to help recession-impacted students at risk of having to interrupt their studies and delay their degrees due to unpaid tuition balances, textbooks and room and board fees. In supporting UNCF’s ESA, Lowe’s offered support in a major way again this academic year to help students walk across the finish line. This current round of support from Lowe’s includes a total award of nearly $64,000 to the five UNCF-supported HBCUs in North Carolina: Bennett College, Johnson C. Smith University, Livingstone College, St. Augustine’s University, and Shaw University. "Lowe’s is a visionary leader in its class,” Shaw University President Dr. Tashni-Ann Dubroy. “The reverberating ramifications of their investment go well beyond a student's graduation. It provides financial strength by eliminating the need for a family to secure a loan or credit card payment toward the final year of college. It gives students confidence and peace of mind heading into the critical senior year, allowing them to focus on internships, jobs and graduate school applications instead of finding part-time employment." About Lowe’s in the Community Lowe’s, a FORTUNE® 50 home improvement company, has a 50-year legacy of supporting the communities it serves through programs that focus on K-12 public education and community improvement projects. Since 2007, Lowe’s and the Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation together have contributed more than $250 million to these efforts, and for more than two decades Lowe’s Heroes employee volunteers have donated their time to make our communities better places to live. To learn more, visit Lowe’s Open House digital newsroom or follow @LowesMedia on Twitter. About UNCF UNCF (United Negro College Fund) is the nation's largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students' education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF annually awards $100 million in scholarships and administers more than 400 programs, including scholarship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrichment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the country. Its logo features the UNCF torch of leadership in education and its widely recognized trademark, "A mind is a terrible thing to waste.®" Learn more at UNCF.org, or for continuous news and updates, follow UNCF on Twitter, @UNCF.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Driving Innovation is a resounding theme of companies large and small in various verticals around the globe. Fall 2016, New Orleans based software company — IDScan.net — decided to inspire millennial college students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to innovate by partnering with Black Enterprise as the exclusive Persona Verification Dev Box Partner of the BE Smart Hackathon sponsored by Toyota. October 9th through 11th, 40 students from 10 HBCUs arrived at the Black Enterprise TechConneXt Summit in Burlingame, CA (Silicon Valley) eager to receive their IDScan.net Web Service API keys to engulf their days and nights with developing and deploying a Minimum Value Product (MVP) based on this year’s theme, In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI). Andrey Stanovnov, CTO of IDScan.net, stated, “IDScan.net is thrilled to provide their technology in the Driving Innovation Hackathon as it fosters growth and innovation in participants that will soon be our future leaders.” Participating schools included Alabama A&M University, Florida A&M University, Hampton University, Howard University, Johnson C. Smith University, Morehouse College, Morgan State University, North Carolina A&T State University, Southern University and A&M College, and Tuskegee University. Each school was tasked to innovate an iOS app within the Ionic Cloud framework and utilized required APIs provided, which included IDScan.net’s Web Service API. To build the verification component of the app, hackers used IDScan.net’s ID scanning Web Services API. One of the goals of the development was to provide a verification in the app that went beyond just entering a username and password. Participants utilized the ID scanning API to verify the identity of the driver by scanning their ID. Nathaniel J., Associate Tech Editor-Silicon Valley of Black Enterprise and Founder & Chief Digital Architect of VUEmega Technologies, states, “ID verification should not be an afterthought when creating various app innovations for end-users today. One of IDScan.net's goals is to build a trusted community of users that are verified. Because of this, IDScan.net is the best solution not only for this year's hackathon but also for companies that want to ensure a trusted community of users.” This year’s winner was Aggie++ from North Carolina A&T State University (NC A&T). NC A&T’s winning iOS IVI is Let’s Go Black. Let’s Go Black is an iOS application that helps discover a customized road trip adventure exploring Black history and culture, while supporting Black owned small businesses along the way. The app allows users to input parameters of the trip (i.e. theme, distance and starting location), then randomly generates a road trip with specially curated stops that are African American inspired attractions and landmarks. Additionally, the app alerts users when they are within the vicinity of Black owned small businesses, who are members of the Let’s Go Black platform. The 2016 BE Smart Hackathon, sponsored by Toyota was judged by industry leading experts from companies such as Intel and AT&T. About IDScan.net IDScan.net helps businesses flourish with ID scanning solutions that automate data capture, streamline visitor management, increase security and optimize efficiency. IDScan.net was the first company to market for mobile ID scanning solutions and continues to deliver cutting-edge technology. For more information, please visit http://www.idscan.net. About Black Enterprise: Black Enterprise, your ultimate source to build Wealth for Life, is the premier business, investing, and wealth-building resource for African Americans. Since 1970, BE has provided essential business information and advice to professionals, corporate executives, entrepreneurs, and decision makers. Every month, Black Enterprise magazine provides 6 million readers with information on entrepreneurship, careers, and financial management. A multimedia company, BE also produces television programming, business and lifestyle events, Web content, and digital media. Visit http://www.blackenterprise.com for more information.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The UNCF Empower Me Tour (EMT), a free, traveling college-and-career-readiness roadshow presented by Target, kicks off its spring 2017 tour in Atlanta on Feb. 3 from 10:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis. The tour was created eight years ago by founding sponsor Wells Fargo to inspire students to take control of their futures by pursuing a four-year college degree and graduating with an education that prepares them for personal responsibility and careers in the 21st century. "We are honored to support UNCF in providing a pathway to opportunities for deserving students, as we collectively assist students in earning degrees and launching meaningful careers,” said Laysha Ward, executive vice president and chief external engagement officer at Target. “The Empower Me Tour has the potential to transform the lives of students by equipping them with the skills needed to become leaders in college and beyond.” The kick-off stop in Atlanta will welcome students from UNCF-supported historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) including Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Interdenominational Theological Center and Spelman College. The EMT is free and is open to non-HBCU students in the area as well. Additional spring 2017 tour stops include UNCF-supported HBCUs Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina on Thursday, February 16 and Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee on Friday, March 24. “A college degree is essential to landing a job in today’s global economy, and we are excited to have the opportunity to offer interviews for internships and jobs on-site to students attending our upcoming Empower Me Tour stops,” said Dr. Michael Lomax, UNCF president and CEO. “Thanks to consistent support from our sponsors and partners in this work, UNCF is able to expand our mission by bringing career-readiness programs directly to HBCU students.” “Wells Fargo is thrilled to collaborate with UNCF and bring the Empower Me Tour to Atlanta for students to gain important interview training and job opportunities upon graduation,” said Wells Fargo’s Director of Strategic Partnerships Gigi Dixon. “We know that education is one of the most important investments we can make in our country, and it is one of our passions to ensure students have access to higher education. This tour makes the dream of higher education a reality for many young people in America by equipping students and parents with the information, tools and resources they need.” College students attending one of the three tour stops will receive expert tips on resume writing and job interviews, in addition to financial and personal branding advice. They will also have the opportunity to interview on-site with select companies for internships or first-year job placements. View a complete schedule at empowermetour.org. The UNCF EMT, which is also sponsored by FedEx, Procter & Gamble Co. and Delta Air Lines, will target high school students this fall, equipping them for the rigors of college and offering on-site scholarships and college admissions. During the fall 2016 tour, 280 scholarships were awarded totaling close to $4 million. The fall tour stops will be announced in late spring 2017. For more information on the Empower Me Tour and to register for free, visit http://www.EmpowerMeTour.org. Follow the conversation on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook: @UNCF #EmpowerMeTour UNCF (United Negro College Fund) is the nation's largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students' education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF annually awards $100 million in scholarships and administers more than 400 programs, including scholarship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrichment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the country. Its logo features the UNCF torch of leadership in education and its widely recognized trademark, "A mind is a terrible thing to waste.®" Learn more at UNCF.org, or for continuous news and updates, follow UNCF on Twitter, @UNCF and #EmpowerMeTour.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Within the pages of Bethel Clifford Hushie-Osabutey’s new book, Withered Into Life – An Autobiography of Rev. Dr. Isaac D. Hushie Osabutey-Aguedze, ($15.49, paperback, 9781498445436) readers will be mesmerized by the story of an African statesman and scholar who overtly and boldly took on the position to teach the world that Christian theology is drawn from ancient African religion, practices and philosophy. His message, considered too revolutionary in 1932 by Western Theologians, is one that must be told. Withered Into Life is no ordinary account. It is a compilation of the hand written and oral accounts by the author’s father, the Reverend Dr. Isaac D. Hushie Osabutey-Aguedze. Prior to his death in 1977, he had charged his son Bethel with the responsibility of putting together and having this book published. It is the story of a self made man who defied all the odds against him right from his conception in the womb for 20 months – rose up to become a global figure who believed in the moral good as the higher good. The events recorded in this book carries readers into an epoch as far back as early nineteenth century, a period when the horrible institution of slave trade and slavery along the African Coastline had not yet been declared illegal let alone an obsolete concept. The story of Rev. Dr. Isaac D. Hushie Osabutey-Aguedze’s success and tremendous life contributions will have the reader in awe. His character and being is clearly portrayed in this book through his many important projects, public transactions and numerous achievements. His story proves that life is a progressive ladder of success to be continuously climbed until one is lost in oblivion. “The greatness of an individual is not determined by aristocratic heritage nor by royal birth, but by the shear determination and the will to succeed,” states the author. “Perseverance is the key to success.” Reverend Dr. Isaac D. Hushie Osabutey-Aguedze walked away from Fame and Fortune to devote his life to the service of God and humanity. He was the patriot who influenced the Late Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, first President of the Republic of Ghana, to replace the Colonial name of Gold Coast with Ghana. In conformity with changing the name Gold Coast to Ghana, he renamed the college Gold Coast Peoples College of which he was the founder and principal Ghanata Secondary School. He was the first recipient of a gold medal awarded to any student of African origin by the Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina. He received this award for his proficiency in the Hebrew language and Hebrew studies. He was also the recipient of a Key to the Nation of Israel awarded in Tel-Aviv in 1960, and upon whom the honorary citizenship of the Hebrew nation was conferred. He was a guest of the Holly Father the Pope at the Vatican in Rome. He was a leading advocate and a voice that cried out loud for the emancipation of the African Continent from European dominance. Xulon Press, a division of Salem Media Group, is the world’s largest Christian self-publisher, with more than 15,000 titles published to date. Retailers may order Withered Into Life – An Autobiography of Rev. Dr. Isaac D. Hushie Osabutey-Aguedze through Ingram Book Company and/or Spring Arbor Book Distributors. The book is available online through xulonpress.com/bookstore, amazon.com, and barnesandnoble.com.


Dancy M.,Johnson C. Smith University | Henderson C.,Western Michigan University
American Journal of Physics | Year: 2010

We report on the initial results of a web-based survey of 722 physics faculty in the United States regarding their instructional practices. The survey responses indicate that most faculty report knowing about many physics education research curricula and pedagogies and are interested and motivated to try them in their teaching. Howeverself-reports of actual classroom practices indicate that the availability of these curricula and pedagogies has not led to fundamental changes in instruction. Faculty report that time is the biggest impediment to implementing more research-based reforms. These results suggest a need for research-based dissemination that accounts for the complexity of instructional change. © 2010 American Association of Physics Teachers.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 399.54K | Year: 2013

Johnson C. Smith University, a minority-serving institution, will create a Shared Instrumentation Research Laboratory (SIRL) that will provide cutting edge equipment for chemistry and biology research. The new instrumentation will be located in the new 65,000-square foot Science Center on the campus in North Carolina. A certification program will ensure that faculty and students are masters in the use of the instrumentation.
Researchers at the institution will provide outreach to high school teachers to teach and collaborate on research projects using the instrumentation. In addition, the STEM conference planned for 2014 will incorporate faculty and student research at the college and high school level. Incentives for new research ideas and collaborations are stimulated by the availability of mini-grant seed funding. Stakeholders from higher education, K-12, community colleges and the private sector will provide advisory assistance for continuous improvement of the project over the three-year duration of the project.
Current research indicates that students who have hand-on exposure to instrumentation are better prepared for direct entry into continuing STEM graduate studies or the STEM workforce. Both formative and summative evaluation will be conducted to inform research and practice on student achievement in STEM disciplines. Research questions to be examined from this project, for example, include whether student achievement in Analytical Chemistry and Instrumental Analysis changed as measured using the American Chemical Society (ACS) exams?


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 616.48K | Year: 2013

The ASPIRE project provides scholarships to support academically talented students with demonstrated financial need in attaining baccalaureate degrees in STEM at Johnson C. Smith University. In addition to scholarship aid, students are being supported through such activities as early involvement in undergraduate research driven by community challenges and a STEM mentoring network which includes peers, faculty, alumni and local industry professionals. The intellectual merit of this project lies in the well-conceived plan that leverages financial support for students with new activities and existing resources at this historically black college. The combination provides comprehensive support for the STEM scholars, in many cases shortening time to degree. The broader impacts include connecting talented graduates with the STEM workforce and graduate programs, as well as providing a well-assessed model for similar institutions in the region and beyond.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 198.20K | Year: 2015

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities-Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) Research Initiation Awards (RIAs) provide support to STEM junior faculty at HBCUs who are starting to build a research program, as well as for mid-career faculty who may have returned to the faculty ranks after holding an administrative post or who needs to redirect and rebuild a research program. Faculty members may pursue research at their home institution, at an NSF-funded Center, at a research intensive institution or at a national laboratory. The RIA projects are expected to help further the faculty members research capability and effectiveness, to improve research and teaching at his or her home institution, and to involve undergraduate students in research experiences. With support from the National Science Foundation, Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU) will conduct research aimed at understanding the biodiversity of parasites in birds of prey. This project will be used to enhance teaching and learning at JCSU and thus, help motivate underrepresented minority students to pursue graduate studies and careers in biological sciences. The research and educational efforts will contribute to the Universitys goal to increase the number of minority students receiving BS degrees in STEM fields. In addition, this project will help JCSU continue to build its reputation as an urban HBCU capable of producing professionally ready graduates and those that are well-prepared to manage graduate school.

The goal of the proposed study is to examine the biodiversity of encysted protozoans in raptors and to begin to unravel the lifecycles of Sarcocystis species that use raptors as definitive hosts. The specific aims of this project are to: 1) Determine the prevalence of encysted protozoans from the muscles of naturally infected raptors by histological and molecular methods; and 2) Collect intestinal tracts from raptors containing Sarcocystis oocysts & sporocysts and determine the presence of S. calchasi by bioassay in cockatiels, Nymphicus hollandicus. This study has the potential to identify new avian infective and potentially pathogenic species. The findings from this study will improve knowledge of the species of protozoan parasites infecting raptors. This project will be conducted in collaboration with the Carolina Raptor Center and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 209.26K | Year: 2010

Physics (13)

This two-phased project is guiding efforts to encourage the use of research-based teaching strategies in college-level physics instruction. The project is studying the instructional change process in general, identifying barriers to change, and identifying change affordances. The goal of the first phase is to observe the change process as it happens. A five-semester longitudinal study of fifteen faculty who have participated in the NSF-supported Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshop and who have indicated a willingness to engage in instructional change is being conducted. This study allows the examination of changes in instructional beliefs and practices as they happen in actual course settings over an extended period of time. Data include faculty interviews conducted at the beginning and end of each semester, surveys of the faculty conducted every three weeks throughout the semester, and teaching artifacts. For the studys second phase, all faculty who have participated in the New Faculty Workshop for the past five years are being surveyed. This second faculty cohort provides the study with a range of participants - from those who have just experienced the workshop to those who have had significant time to incorporate and reflect on their workshop experiences and to seek additional information about instructional innovations. The second study focuses on testing ideas generated as a result of the longitudinal study and on generating more generalized results because of the larger sample size.


Brown G.,Johnson C. Smith University
The ABNF journal : official journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty in Higher Education, Inc | Year: 2012

University and college faculty members may face inappropriate student behavior in a global classroom. This situation can complicate the maintenance of a positive effective learning environment. Student disruption is seen as disturbing behavior that interferes with the faculty member's academic or administrative ability to conduct class, or the ability of other students to profit from the class instruction. Disruptive behavior may threaten or endanger the physical or psychological health, safety or welfare of others. Various types of disruptive behavior and disrespect that university or college faculty are likely to experience include: grandstanding (use the classroom for themselves by monopolizing class discussion with no regard to relevancy to the discussion); prolonged chattering (small cliques of students who engage in private conversations or passing notes to each other); noisy electric devices (cell phones ringing in class, or students talking or text messaging during class time); leaving and entering class (frequently in the absence of notice to professor of illness or other extenuating circumstances); and disputing the professor's authority or expertise (students may be disappointed or unhappy over a grade and may debunk or devalue the professor's judgment, authority and expertise). This action may be in the form of comments in the class or memos to department chair or dean. Persistent speaking without permission and verbal or physical threats to faculty members or other students are also disruptive mannerisms. Working with a diverse student population can present unique challenges. Multicultural issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, physical, emotional or socioeconomic status and sexual orientation might require increased sensitivity, knowledge and self-exploration.

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