Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company

Grandview, NJ, United States

Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company

Grandview, NJ, United States

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Koschier F.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Kostrubsky V.,Vistakon | Toole C.,CeeTox Inc. | Gallo M.A.,UMDNJ
Food and Chemical Toxicology | Year: 2011

The current study investigated the influence of ethanol and ethanol-containing mouthrinses on model chemical permeability in an in vitro oral buccal mucosal construct (EpiOral, ORL-200, MatTek). Innate ethanol transport and metabolism in the tissue construct was also studied. Caffeine flux in buccal tissue was measured after pre-treatment with < 26.9% ethanol or Listerine ® products under conditions modeling a typical mouthwash rinsing. Specifically, a 30s exposure to alcohol products followed by a 10h non-treatment phase and then a second 30s exposure prior to addition of caffeine. At 10min specific intervals, media was collected from the basal part of the tissue insert for HPLC analysis of caffeine. The results demonstrated no increase in caffeine flux due to prior exposure to either ethanol or Listerine ®, and the flux and permeability constants were derived from the linear phase. No cytotoxicity or histopathological effects were observed in these tissues. We also studied the transepithelial transport and metabolism of ethanol in these tissues. Transport of ethanol was concentration-dependent with rate of diffusion proportional to the concentration gradient across the membrane. The potential metabolism of ethanol in the EpiOral construct was addressed by analyzing the remaining level of ethanol after incubation and de novo accumulation of acetaldehyde or acetic acid in culture media. Incubation for 30min incubation resulted in no change in ethanol level up to 2000mM, the highest concentration tested. No acetaldehyde or acetic acid was detected in culture media. In conclusion, ethanol and ethanol-containing mouthrinse treatment modeled after a typical daily mouthrinse pattern had no apparent effect on the permeability of the standard model chemical, caffeine. This exposure also had no effect on the viability of the tissue construct or histopathology, and uptake of ethanol was rapid into the tissue construct. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Cula G.O.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Bargo P.R.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Nkengne A.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Kollias N.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company
Skin Research and Technology | Year: 2013

Background: As people mature, their skin gradually presents lines, wrinkles, and folds that become more pronounced with time. Skin wrinkles are perceived as important cues in communicating information about the age of the person. Nowadays, documenting the facial appearance through imaging is prevalent in skin research, therefore detection and quantitative assessment of the degree of facial wrinkling can be a useful tool for establishing an objective baseline and for assessing benefits to facial appearance due to various dermatological treatments. However, few image-based algorithms for computationally assessing facial wrinkles are present in the literature, and those that exist have limited reliability. Methods: In this work, an algorithm for automatic detection of facial wrinkles is developed, based on estimating the orientation and the frequency of elongated spatial features, captured via digital image filtering. Results: The algorithm is tested against one set of clinically validated 11-point wrinkle scales present on the face. The algorithm is employed for assessing the presence of forehead furrows on a set of 100 clinically graded facial images. The proposed computational assessment correlates well with the corresponding clinical scores. Conclusion: We find that the results are in better agreement with clinical scoring when the wrinkle depth information, approximated via filter responses, is combined with the wrinkle length information as opposed to the case when the two measures are considered separately. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Zedayko T.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Azriel M.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Kollias N.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2011

Synopsis An ageing study was conducted to capture skin colour parameters in the CIELab system from Caucasians of both genders and all available adult ages. This study produced a linear correlation between L* and age for a Caucasian population between 20 and 59 years of age as follows: (L* value) = -0.13 Á - (Age in years) + 63.01. Previous studies have addressed age-related changes in skin colour. This work presents a novel consumer correlated quantitative linear model of skin brightness by which to communicate age-related changes. Two product assessment studies are also presented here, demonstrating the ability of anti-ageing products to deliver on objective and subjective improvements in skin brightness. It was determined to be possible to use the fundamental Caucasian L*-age correlation to describe product benefits in a novel quantitative and consumer-relevant fashion, through the depiction of a 'years back' calculation. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.


Chantalat J.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Bruning E.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Sun Y.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Liu J.-C.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company
Journal of Drugs in Dermatology | Year: 2012

Background: The first signs of facial skin photo-aging often occur in the skin of the periorbital area and include sagging, loss of firmness and definition, and sallowness. Epidermal wounds have been shown to alter the trans-epithelial electrical potential creating an electric signal that directs cell migration in epithelial wound healing; this electric field declines sharply with age. A topical galvanic zinc-copper complex, which couples elemental zinc and copper to create a biomimetic electric field, has demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity and extracellular matrix improvement in vitro, including collagen and elastin production. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a galvanic zinc-copper complex on photo-aging parameters in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Materials and Methods: In this eight-week study, women (40-65 years) with mild to moderate photo-aging were randomized to use placebo or 1 of 3 galvanic zinc-copper complex compositions (gel and activating moisturizer). Efficacy evaluations included clinical grading, specialized clinical imaging, and subject self-assessments performed at baseline, 15-30 minutes after product application and after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Tolerability was based on adverse events and clinical grading of irritation. Significance was set at P≤0.05 versus baseline and between treatment groups. Results: The study was completed by 124 women. Compositions containing the galvanic zinc-copper complex showed statistically significant clinical improvements versus placebo and baseline rapidly (15-30 min) after application and through week 8. Clinical grading showed significant improvement versus placebo in skin radiance and under-eye dark circles 15-30 minutes after first application with continued improvement through week 8, and in overall photo-damage, fine lines, lifted appearance of the eyes, and under-eye wrinkles starting after two weeks and continuing through week 8. Test compositions were well tolerated. Conclusion: This galvanic zinc-copper complex provided rapid and lasting improvements versus placebo in photo-aged skin, supporting its use in topical anti-aging formulations. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.


Seo I.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Bargo P.R.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Kollias N.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company
Journal of Biomedical Optics | Year: 2010

We present a simple and cost-effective optical technique for the simultaneous assessment of pulsating and total blood noninvasively in an inflammatory skin lesion. Acquisitions of diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible range at 6 Hz are used to trace the oscillating components of reflectance. Measurements on erythematous lesions from a UV insult show slow changing signal at about 0.1 Hz and heart-driven regular oscillations at about 1 Hz simultaneously. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique in monitoring both pulsating and steady components of the blood in inflammatory lesions of the skin. © 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.


Reynertson K.A.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Garay M.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Nebus J.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Chon S.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Drugs in Dermatology | Year: 2015

Background: Oat (Avena sativa) in colloidal form is a centuries-old topical treatment for a variety of skin conditions, including skin rashes, erythema, burns, itch, and eczema; however, few studies have investigated the exact mechanism of action for the anti-inflammatory activity of colloidal oatmeal. Methods: Four extracts of colloidal oatmeal were made with various solvents and tested in anti-inflammatory and antioxidant assays. In addition, an investigator blind study was performed with twenty-nine healthy female subjects who exhibited bilateral mild to moderate itch with moderate to severe dry skin on their lower legs. Subjects were treated with a colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion. Results: Extracts of colloidal oatmeal diminished pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro and the colloidal oat skin protectant lotion showed significant clinical improvements in skin dryness, scaling, roughness, and itch intensity. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that colloidal oat extracts exhibit direct anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits while using the colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion.


Bargo P.R.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company | Kollias N.,Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company
British Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2010

Background Determination of skin surface texture is of particular importance in the field of dermatology as such measurements can be used for skin diagnostics and evaluation of therapeutic or cosmetic treatments. Profilometry of skin replicas, three-dimensional imaging and computer vision have been successfully used to measure and document skin texture. Nevertheless, the development of a simpler and faster technique may prove to be advantageous in a clinical setting. Objectives We propose the use of polarization imaging with high angles of incidence as a simple alternative to measure/document skin texture/roughness. Methods A system based on digital photography and polarization optics was developed to acquire and compute texture images. Optimization of the system configuration was conducted to enhance the contrast for measuring skin roughness. The method was validated against roughness standards and tested in clinical studies. Measurements were made in subjects aged from 9 to 70 years and image analysis was used to evaluate texture. Results The developed texture scale was shown to correlate closely to the results from clinical assessment and from roughness standards. Frequency domain analysis showed a significantly different power spectrum for the texture images of young subjects when compared with older subjects. The evaluation of texture as a function of age showed that facial skin roughness increased linearly from teenage to 40 years followed by a plateau thereafter. Conclusions The system proved to be a useful clinical tool for assessing skin texture. The age-related results may indicate that some skin texture features are formed before the age of 40 years. © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.


PubMed | Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products Company
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of biomedical optics | Year: 2011

We present a simple and cost-effective optical technique for the simultaneous assessment of pulsating and total blood noninvasively in an inflammatory skin lesion. Acquisitions of diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible range at 6 Hz are used to trace the oscillating components of reflectance. Measurements on erythematous lesions from a UV insult show slow changing signal at about 0.1 Hz and heart-driven regular oscillations at about 1 Hz simultaneously. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique in monitoring both pulsating and steady components of the blood in inflammatory lesions of the skin.

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