Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide

Johnson & Johnson Consumer, NJ, United States

Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide

Johnson & Johnson Consumer, NJ, United States

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PubMed | Johnson and Johnson Consumer Companies Inc., Johnson & Johnson, University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide
Type: | Journal: Journal of clinical periodontology | Year: 2015

This 4-week, single-centre, randomized, examiner-blind, controlled study investigated the efficacy and safety of 0.15% ethyl lauroyl arginate (LAE)-containing mouthrinse in adults with mild-to-moderate gingivitis.Subjects were randomized to use 0.15% LAE-containing mouthrinse or 5% hydroalcohol-negative control twice daily after brushing with standard fluoride toothpaste. Plaque, gingivitis and bleeding were assessed at baseline and Weeks 2 and 4. The oral microflora was analysed at baseline and Week 4.Eighty-seven subjects were randomized to treatment. The 0.15% LAE-containing mouthrinse was associated with statistically significantly (p<0.001) greater reductions in mean plaque and gingivitis scores versus the negative control at Week 2 (difference [95% confidence interval]: plaque 0.83 [0.64, 1.02], 29.1%; gingivitis 0.11 [0.07, 0.14], 4.8%) and Week 4 (co-primary endpoints: plaque 1.23 [1.07, 1.39], 42.6%; gingivitis 0.23 [0.19, 0.28], 10.7%). Bleeding-index scores were significantly (p<0.001) reduced versus the control at Weeks 2 (by 0.04 [0.03, 0.06], 36.3%) and 4 (by 0.06 [0.04, 0.08], 50.9%). No shifts were detected in the oral microflora. There were no treatment-related adverse events.The 0.15% LAE-containing mouthrinse was well tolerated and significantly reduced plaque, gingivitis and bleeding when used as an adjunct to tooth brushing for 4weeks.


PubMed | Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The British journal of dermatology | Year: 2011

Scaling skin involves an imbalance between cell proliferation and desquamation, resulting in partially detached corneocytes at the stratum corneum (SC) surface that become visible as they scatter light.The purpose of this study was to document scaling skin with no associated pathology, to estimate the range of normal corneocyte detachment in the average population, and to determine if age, pigmentation and/or body sites of different exposures contribute to differences observed in the SC.Healthy African-American and Caucasian female subjects (n = 151) from a typical central New Jersey population, aged between 14 and 75 years, were evaluated on the dorsal forearm and upper inner arm. Dermatoscopy and adhesive tape were used to evaluate the appearance and adhesion of surface corneocytes. Transepidermal water loss and conductivity were measured to assess water-handling properties of the SC. Measurements were conducted during the winter.Corneocyte detachment observed with dermatoscopy became more prevalent with age and was more severe on the dorsal forearm and in Caucasian subjects. The distribution of the amount of corneocyte removal with adhesive tape increased with age. The range of values was larger in the dorsal forearm than the upper inner arm and was greater in Caucasian subjects than African-American subjects. Minimal changes were observed for water-handling properties.The architecture of the outer SC appears different between ages, body sites of different exposures, and individuals of different pigmentation groups, but minimal differences in water-handling properties are observed.

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