John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack

Hackensack, NJ, United States

John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack

Hackensack, NJ, United States
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Cavo M.,University of Bologna | Terpos E.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Nanni C.,Nuclear Medicine | Moreau P.,University of Nantes | And 24 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2017

The International Myeloma Working Group consensus aimed to provide recommendations for the optimal use of 18fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT in patients with multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders, including smouldering multiple myeloma and solitary plasmacytoma. 18F-FDG PET/CT can be considered a valuable tool for the work-up of patients with both newly diagnosed and relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma because it assesses bone damage with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, and detects extramedullary sites of proliferating clonal plasma cells while providing important prognostic information. The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT is mandatory to confirm a suspected diagnosis of solitary plasmacytoma, provided that whole-body MRI is unable to be performed, and to distinguish between smouldering and active multiple myeloma, if whole-body X-ray (WBXR) is negative and whole-body MRI is unavailable. Based on the ability of 18F-FDG PET/CT to distinguish between metabolically active and inactive disease, this technique is now the preferred functional imaging modality to evaluate and to monitor the effect of therapy on myeloma-cell metabolism. Changes in FDG avidity can provide an earlier evaluation of response to therapy compared to MRI scans, and can predict outcomes, particularly for patients who are eligible to receive autologous stem-cell transplantation. 18F-FDG PET/CT can be coupled with sensitive bone marrow-based techniques to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) inside and outside the bone marrow, helping to identify those patients who are defined as having imaging MRD negativity. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


PubMed | Karolinska Institutet, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Bristol and 18 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2016

Waldenstrm macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (WM/LPL) is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic proliferation, lymph node and spleen enlargement, bone marrow involvement, and IgM production. Treatment varies based on the extent and biology of disease. In some patients, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) may have curative potential. We evaluated long-term outcomes of 144 patients who received adult alloHCT for WM/LPL. Data were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database (2001 to 2013). Patients received myeloablative(n=67) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC; n=67). Median age at alloHCT was 53 years, and median time from diagnosis to transplantation was 41 months. Thirteen percent (n=18) failed prior autologous HCT. About half (n=82, 57%) had chemosensitive disease at the time of transplantation, whereas 22% had progressive disease. Rates of progression-free survival, overall survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 5 years were 46%, 52%, 24%, and 30%, respectively. Patients with chemosensitive disease and better pretransplant disease status experienced significantly superior overall survival. There were no significant differences in progression-free survival based on conditioning (myeloablative, 50%, versus RIC, 41%) or graft source. Conditioning intensity did not impact treatment-related mortality or relapse. The most common causes of death were primary disease and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). AlloHCT yielded durable survival in select patients with WM/LPL. Strategies to reduce mortality from GVHD and post-transplant relapse are necessary to improve this approach.


Dhakal B.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Vesole D.H.,John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack | Vesole D.H.,Georgetown University | Hari P.N.,Medical College of Wisconsin
Bone Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2016

Despite remarkable progress in survival with the availability of novel agents, an overwhelming majority of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) relapse and the curability of MM remains limited. Genetically defined high-risk MM represents a subgroup with an aggressive disease course despite novel agents. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative option in MM that has several advantages including a tumor-free graft, and the potential for sustained immune-mediated disease control. However, historically high treatment-related mortality (TRM) and conflicting reports from prospective studies in the United States and European Union have limited the utilization of this modality. Meanwhile, newer preparative regimens, planned maintenance strategies and improvements in supportive care have led to a decline in TRM and better survival in recent years. The allo-SCT platform also provides additional options of immunotherapy at relapse including donor lymphocyte infusions, immunomodulatory drug maintenance and withdrawal of immune suppression. In this article, we provide an in-depth review of literature for allo-SCT and other immunotherapy options, as well as the authors' approach to using allo-SCT in MM. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


PubMed | Mayo Clinic Arizona and Phoenix Childrens Hospital, University of Bristol, University of Houston, Hospital Infantil Universitario Nino Jesus and 32 more.
Type: | Journal: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2016

Bortezomib (V), lenalidomide (R), cyclophosphamide (C), and dexamethasone (D) are components of the most commonly used modern doublet (RD, VD) or triplet (VRD, CVD) initial induction regimens before autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for multiple myeloma (MM) in the United States. In this study we evaluated 693 patients receiving upfront AHCT after initial induction therapy with modern doublet or triplet regimens using data reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 2008 to 2013. Analysis was limited to those receiving a single AHCT after 1 line of induction therapy within 12 months from treatment initiation for MM. In multivariate analysis, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were similar irrespective of induction regimen. However, high-risk cytogenetics and nonreceipt of post-transplant maintenance/consolidation therapy were associated with higher risk of relapse. Patients receiving post-transplant therapy had significantly improved 3-year PFS versus no post-transplant therapy (55% versus 39%, P=.0001). This benefit was most evident in patients not achieving at least a complete response post-AHCT (P=.005). In patients receiving upfront AHCT, the choice of induction regimen (doublet or triplet therapies) appears to be of lower impact than use of post-transplant therapy.


PubMed | Mayo Clinic Arizona and Phoenix Childrens Hospital, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, City of Hope National medical Center, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and 24 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2016

Conventional cytogenetics and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identify high-risk multiple myeloma (HRM) populations characterized by poor outcomes. We analyzed these differences among HRM versus non-HRM populations after upfront autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (autoHCT). Between 2008 and 2012, 715 patients with multiple myeloma identified by FISH and/or cytogenetic data with upfront autoHCT were identified in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database. HRM was defined as del17p, t(4;14), t(14;16), hypodiploidy (<45 chromosomes excluding -Y) or chromosome 1 p and 1q abnormalities; all others were non-HRM. Among 125 HRM patients (17.5%), induction with bortezomib and immunomodulatory agents (imids) was higher compared with non-HRM (56% versus 43%, P<.001) with similar pretransplant complete response (CR) rates (14% versus 16%, P .1). At day 100 post-transplant, at least a very good partial response was 59% in HRM and 61% in non-HRM (P=.6). More HRM patients received post-transplant therapy with bortezomib and imids (26% versus 12%, P=.004). Three-year post-transplant progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in HRM versus non-HRM were 37% versus 49% (P<.001) and 72% versus 85% (P<.001), respectively. At 3 years, PFS for HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy was 46% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33 to 59) versus 14% (95% CI, 4 to 29) and in non-HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy 55% (95% CI, 49 to 62) versus 39% (95% CI, 32 to 47); rates of OS for HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy were 81% (95% CI, 70 to 90) versus 48% (95% CI, 30 to 65) compared with 88% (95% CI, 84 to 92) and 79% (95% CI, 73 to 85) in non-HRM patients with and without post-transplant therapy, respectively. Among patients receiving post-transplant therapy, there was no difference in OS between HRM and non-HRM (P = .08). In addition to HRM, higher stage, less than a CR pretransplant, lack of post-transplant therapy, and African American race were associated with worse OS. In conclusion, we show HRM patients achieve similar day 100 post-transplant responses compared with non-HRM patients, but these responses are not sustained. Post-transplant therapy appeared to improve the poor outcomes of HRM.


PubMed | Medical College of Wisconsin and John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bone marrow transplantation | Year: 2016

Despite remarkable progress in survival with the availability of novel agents, an overwhelming majority of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) relapse and the curability of MM remains limited. Genetically defined high-risk MM represents a subgroup with an aggressive disease course despite novel agents. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative option in MM that has several advantages including a tumor-free graft, and the potential for sustained immune-mediated disease control. However, historically high treatment-related mortality (TRM) and conflicting reports from prospective studies in the United States and European Union have limited the utilization of this modality. Meanwhile, newer preparative regimens, planned maintenance strategies and improvements in supportive care have led to a decline in TRM and better survival in recent years. The allo-SCT platform also provides additional options of immunotherapy at relapse including donor lymphocyte infusions, immunomodulatory drug maintenance and withdrawal of immune suppression. In this article, we provide an in-depth review of literature for allo-SCT and other immunotherapy options, as well as the authors approach to using allo-SCT in MM.

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