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Avivi I.,Tel Aviv Medical Center | Goy A.,John Theurer Cancer Center
Clinical Cancer Research | Year: 2015

Although mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, proactive research efforts fueled by challenges in the management of MCL have led to an increase in median overall survival (OS) of 2.5 years in the mid 1990s to beyond 5 years nowadays. This improvement is due mostly to the use of dose-intensive strategies, particularly cytarabine-containing regimens [with or without high-dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) consolidation], which are associated with deeper remission (and higher molecular complete response rate), as well as better salvage therapies. Along this line, MCL became the first lymphoma for which four novel agents have been approved in the relapsed/refractory setting: temsirolimus, lenalidomide, ibrutinib, and bortezomib (the last agent approved both in relapsed/refractory disease and in first-line combination therapy). In addition, the use of rituximab maintenance has helped reduce relapse rates and improve outcome. However, in routine practice (i.e., outside clinical trials), the outcome of MCL remains overall unchanged with standard immunochemotherapy, and even after HDT-ASCT, most patients still relapse and frequently develop chemoresistance. The persistent lack of consensus for the treatment of MCL explains the rather impressive variability in management of these patients. The integration of newer therapies, either in combination with immunochemotherapy or as consolidation/maintenance postinduction, offers new opportunities for patients with MCL. This review highlights how such developments can help refine the current MCL paradigm. © 2015 American Association for Cancer Research.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Physicians’ Education Resource®, (PER®), will host the 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on Leukemias, Lymphomas and Myeloma, and the symposium will be co-chaired by Andre Goy — who is professor of medicine, chief of lymphoma and director at John Theurer Cancer Center, chair of oncology for Hackensack Meridian Health Network in Hackensack, New Jersey — and Sager Lonial, who is a professor and chair of the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Emory School of Medicine, chief medical officer of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. “We are in the midst of unprecedented changes in medicine particularly in oncology,” said Goy. “Symposiums such as Miami Hematology, offer an opportunity for each attendee to share directly with world experts how such changes can truly reshape patients’ care.” The 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on Leukemias, Lymphomas and Myeloma is designed to facilitate application of the rapid changes seen in oncology while treating hematological malignancies. As health care continues to rapidly evolve, it becomes critical not only to be able to choose the best option for each patient precision medicine but also in an era with so many options available— to appreciate the best sequence of therapies to optimize outcome. This will be addressed throughout the three-day-conference during the well-known and highly interactive Medical Crossfire® discussion panels and real-world case discussions. In addition, Amy E. Herman, will speak on “The Art of Perception and its Connection to the Art of Clinical Medicine.” Herman is a leading expert in professional development, training some of the most influential industry leaders around the world, including the FBI, CIA, Scotland Yard and the Peace Corps. Previously, Herman was the director of the educational development for Thirteen/WNET, the public television station, serving New Jersey and New York. The three-day symposium will be held at the Trump International Miami on Feb.23-25 in Sunny Isles Beach, Florida, located 3.5 miles from the Miami International Airport and 13 miles from the Fort Lauderdale International Airport. About PER® Since 1995, PER® has been the educational resource of choice for live and online activities focusing on oncology and hematology. PER® provides high-quality, evidence-based activities featuring leading national and international faculty with a focus on practice-changing advances and standards of care in treatment and disease management. Activities also include topics on emerging strategies currently under investigation, supportive care, diagnosis and staging, prevention, screening and early detection, and practice management. With the rapid advances occurring in the field of oncology, understanding how to use molecular data to diagnose and stage patients, selecting the most appropriate candidates for novel therapeutic agents, individualizing treatment based on tumor type, and referring patients to clinical trials will continue to ensure the highest level of patient care is provided. PER® serves the oncology health care community, including physicians, fellows, advanced practice nurses, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists, and researchers. PER® is part of the Cranbury, N.J.-based Michael J. Hennessy Associates, Inc. family of businesses. Learn more at http://www.gotoper.com and http://www.mjhassoc.com


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Physicians Education Resource®, LLC (PER®) announces Amy E. Herman as Keynote speaker for the 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on Leukemias, Lymphomas, and Myeloma, on February 24, 2017. In making the announcement, PER® president, Phil Talamo said, “We are honored to have Amy E. Herman present at this year’s conference, her unprecedented knowledge conducting leadership training will provide attendees with added expertise to lead future medical teams, which is vital to improving the lives of cancer patients in such a fast-moving field.” With over 14 years of experience, Herman is the founder and president of The Art of Perception, Inc., and a leading expert in professional development, training some of the most influential industry leaders around the world, including the FBI, CIA, Scotland Yard, and the Peace Corps. Prior to this, Herman was the director of the educational development for the public television station, serving New Jersey and New York, Thirteen/WNET. In addition, the co-chairs for this year’s conference are Andre Goy, MD, MS, and Sagar Lonial, MD, FACP. Dr. Goy is the chairman and director of the John Theurer Cancer Center and the chief of the division of lymphoma. Dr. Lonial is the chief medical officer for the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and a board-certified hematologist and medical oncologist. The 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on Leukemias, Lymphomas and Myeloma is a three-day educational symposium from February 23rd-25th at the Trump International Miami. To register for the symposium, visit: http://www.gotoper.com About PER® Since 1995, PER® has been the educational resource of choice for live and online activities focusing on oncology and hematology. PER® provides high-quality, evidence-based activities featuring leading national and international faculty with a focus on practice-changing advances and standards of care in treatment and disease management. Activities also include topics on emerging strategies currently under investigation, supportive care, diagnosis and staging, prevention, screening and early detection, and practice management. With the rapid advances occurring in the field of oncology, understanding how to use molecular data to diagnose and stage patients, selecting the most appropriate candidates for novel therapeutic agents, individualizing treatment based on tumor type, and referring patients to clinical trials will continue to ensure the highest level of patient care is provided. PER® serves the oncology health care community, including physicians, fellows, advanced practice nurses, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists, and researchers. PER® is part of the Plainsboro, N.J.-based Michael J. Hennessy Associates, Inc. family of businesses. Learn more at http://www.gotoper.com and http://www.mjhassoc.com


Wang M.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | Martin T.,University of California at San Francisco | Bensinger W.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Alsina M.,H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2013

We previously reported a phase 1b dose-escalation study of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone (CRd) in relapsed or progressive multiple myeloma where the maximum planned dose (MPD) was carfilzomib 20 mg/m2 days 1 and 2 of cycle 1 and 27 mg/m2 days 8, 9, 15, 16, and thereafter; lenalidomide 25 mg days 1 to 21; and dexamethasone40 mg once weekly on28-day cycles. Herein, wepresent results from the phase 2 dose expansion at the MPD, focusing on the 52 patients enrolled in the MPD cohort. Median follow-up was 24.4 months. In the MPD cohort, overall response rate (ORR) was 76.9% with median time to response of 0.95 month (range, 0.5-4.6) and duration of response (DOR) of 22.1 months. Median progression-free survival was 15.4 months. ORR was 69.2% in bortezomib-refractory patients and 69.6% in lenalidomide-refractory patients with median DOR of 22.1 and 10.8 months, respectively. A median of 9.5 (range, 1-45) carfilzomib cycles were started with 7.7% of patients requiring carfilzomib dose reductions and 19.2% discontinuing CRd due to adverse events (AEs). Grade 3/4 AEs included lymphopenia (48.1%), neutropenia (32.7%), thrombocytopenia (19.2%), and anemia (19.2%). CRd at the MPD was well tolerated with robust, rapid, and durable responses. © 2013 by The American Society of Hematology.


–  Median overall survival improved to 13.4 from 12.9 months after extended follow-up  – –  64% of patients alive after one year compared to historical rates of 25-38%   – SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Nov. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cortice Biosciences announced today follow-up results from CB-017, a Phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating TPI 287 plus bevacizumab (Avastin®) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who have not received prior bevacizumab.  These results will be presented this evening during a poster session at the 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Neuro-Oncology. TPI 287 is a novel microtubule stabilizing agent that readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier.  Prior preclinical and clinical results support the potential of this agent for the treatment of aggressive brain cancers in patients with few therapeutic options. “Results from our TPI 287 development program continue to support meaningful drug activity in GBM,” said George Farmer, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Cortice.  “Compared to overall survival rates observed in other multi-center clinical trials enrolling similar GBM populations, outcomes of CB-017 are very encouraging.  We look forward to continued development of TPI 287 for treatment of GBM and presenting final results from the Phase 1 portion of CB-017 at another medical meeting next year.” Twenty-four patients with recurrent GBM that had progressed beyond first line treatment and who had not received prior bevacizumab were enrolled in the dose-escalation portion of CB-017.  In addition to TPI 287 (140 to 220 mg/m2 administered every three weeks in seven dose cohorts), all patients received standard-of-care bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every two weeks).  Twenty and 23 patients were evaluable for overall response and overall survival, respectively. Key efficacy metrics are as follows: Safety data available from 22 patients enrolled in CB-017 supports the favorable tolerability profile of TPI 287.  With the exception of Grade 3 myelosuppression (3 patients), all adverse events regarded as possibly related to TPI 287 have been mild to moderate.  No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) have been observed to date. Based on observations from CB-017 so far, an optimal dose of TPI 287 has been selected for the expansion stage of the trial.  Following guidance provided by FDA, results from this study will inform the design of a single Phase 3 registration trial for TPI 287 in GBM. “The improvement in median overall survival to 13.4 from 12.9 months appears to be driven by outcomes in patients treated at the higher doses of this study,” said Dr. Samuel Goldlust, Medical Director of the Brain and Spine Institute of the John Theurer Cancer Center in Hackensack, NJ and Principal Investigator of CB-017. “This positive survival trend and the excellent tolerability of TPI 287 observed in the study to date support continued investigation in recurrent glioblastoma, an indication in desperate need of new therapies.” TPI 287 is a novel taxoid which binds to and stabilizes the assembly of microtubules similarly to commonly used taxanes, including paclitaxel (Taxol® and Abraxane®) and docetaxel (Taxotere®).  In oncology treatment settings, microtubule stabilization by these agents leads to mitotic arrest and cancer cell death.  TPI 287 has advantages over these taxanes for the treatment of brain cancers due to its ability to penetrate the central nervous system, which is often shielded from systemic administration of other anti-cancer drugs. Microtubule stabilization by TPI 287 may also have potential for the treatment of neurologic disorders affected by tau protein pathology.  These include tauopathies such as Alzheimer’s disease and orphan diseases, such as progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and frontotemporal dementia. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common form of brain cancer.  Five-year survival after diagnosis is about 5%.  The Central Brain Tumor Registry estimates that about 24,790 primary malignant brain tumors cases will be diagnosed in the US in 2016, 46% of which will be GBM.  Typical front-line treatments include stereotactic or whole brain radiotherapy plus temozolomide (Temodar®).  Patients with recurrent disease are candidates for treatment with Avastin®, the last drug approved by FDA for this disease. Cortice Biosciences, Inc. is a clinical-stage drug development company developing novel therapies for oncologic and neurologic disease indications with urgent unmet medical need.  More information can be found at www.corticebiosciences.com. This media release may contain forward-looking statements about Cortice Biosciences, which can be identified by the use of terminology such as "will," "would," "should," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "may," "estimates," "predicts," "projects,” or similar expressions intended to identify such statements.  These statements reflect the current views of Cortice with respect to future events, are based on assumptions, and subject to risks and uncertainties.


Alsina M.,University of South Florida | Trudel S.,University of Toronto | Furman R.R.,New York Medical College | Rosen P.J.,Tower Cancer Research Foundation | And 6 more authors.
Clinical Cancer Research | Year: 2012

Purpose: Carfilzomib is a next-generation, selective, proteasome inhibitor with clinical activity in relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. The objectives of this phase I study were to establish the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles of escalating doses of carfilzomib in patients with relapsed or refractory hematologic malignancies. Experimental design: Carfilzomib (doses ranging from 1.2-27 mg/m2) was administered i.v. on 2 consecutive days for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. Single-agent dose escalation (n=37) was followed by a dose-expansion phase (n = 11) that comprised 2 cohorts (carfilzomib or carfilzomib + dexamethasone). During dose expansion, carfilzomib was administered starting with 20 mg/m 2 during the first week (days 1, 2) and then escalated to 27 mg/m2 thereafter. Results: A maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached during dose escalation. Dosing in the expansion cohort was well tolerated. Adverse events were manageable and primarily of grade I or II. The main hematologic adverse events of ≥ grade III were anemia and thrombocytopenia. Notably, there were no observations of grade III or more peripheral neuropathy. Carfilzomib was cleared rapidly with an elimination half-life of less than 30 minutes but still induced dose-dependent inhibition of the 20S chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity. At doses of 15 to 27 mg/m 2, there was evidence of activity among patients with multiple myeloma and with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusions: Escalated dosing of carfilzomib on a schedule of 2 consecutive days for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle was tolerable and showed promising activity. This dose regimen has been selected for ongoing and future clinical studies, including PX-171-003A1 and the pivotal trial ASPIRE. ©2012 AACR.


NEW YORK, Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Andre Goy, Chairman of the John Theurer Cancer Center and board member of Cota, the leading data and technology platform for value-based precision medicine, presented "Impact of Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and Refining the MIPI Index in...


SAN DIEGO, Dec. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Andre Goy, Cota board member and President of the John Theurer Cancer Center, will present a new study utilizing real-world evidence to demonstrate the importance of comorbidities on outcomes of patients with mantle cell lymphoma at the 58th...


Jain S.,University of Toledo | Nyirenda T.,Hackensack University Medical Center | Yates J.,John Theurer Cancer Center | Munver R.,John Theurer Cancer Center | Munver R.,University of Medicine
Journal of Urology | Year: 2013

Purpose: Partial nephrectomy is performed for renal masses as a means of preserving renal function. Renal artery pseudoaneurysm is a potential complication of partial nephrectomy. We determined the incidence of renal artery pseudoaneurysm after open and minimally invasive partial nephrectomy, and performed a comparative analysis. Materials and Methods: We queried the Ovid Medline® and PubMed® databases to locate published reports of renal artery pseudoaneurysm after partial nephrectomy. Studies were included in comparative analysis if they were in English and showed the total number of procedures performed and perioperative complications. Results: Included studies represented a total of 5,229 patients, of whom 2,494 and 2,735 underwent open and minimally invasive partial nephrectomy, respectively. A total of 25 and 52 renal artery pseudoaneurysms were reported after open and minimally invasive procedures (weighted 1.00% and 1.96%, respectively). The difference between these 2 values was statistically significant (p ≤0.001). Patients diagnosed with renal artery pseudoaneurysm presented a mean of 14.9 days after surgery and 87.3% of them had gross hematuria at presentation. Almost all patients with renal artery pseudoaneurysm were treated with percutaneous angioembolization with 96% success. Conclusions: Although it is rare, the risk of renal artery pseudoaneurysm after partial nephrectomy is significant and should be high on the differential for a patient who presents postoperatively with gross hematuria. The incidence of renal artery pseudoaneurysm is higher after minimally invasive partial nephrectomy than after an open approach. Angioembolization for renal artery pseudoaneurysm after partial nephrectomy offers an excellent success rate and minimal patient morbidity. © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc.


Flaherty A.M.,John Theurer Cancer Center
Oncology nursing forum | Year: 2015

A 65-year-old Polish immigrant named T. J. was diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer in January 2012 when he presented with obstructing sigmoid colon cancer and liver metastases. A diverting colostomy as well as biopsy of his liver metastases was performed and chemotherapy with FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], leucovorin, oxaliplatin) and bevacizumab was initiated. After three months, he transitioned to maintenance therapy with infusional 5-FU and bevacizumab until he progressed in August 2012. Oxaliplatin was reintroduced and he responded until he developed progressive neuropathy in November and his therapy was changed to FOLFIRI (5-FU, leucovorin, irinotecan) and bevacizumab. T. J. developed liver progression after three months and, because he was Kras wild type, irinotecan and panitumumab were initiated. Liver-directed therapy also was pursued and he underwent radioembolization with yittrium-90 followed by chemoembolization with irinotecan-eluded beads. At the time of these procedures, T. J.'s portal and hepatic venous systems were patent (i.e., no thrombosis or obstruction causing portal hypertension).

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