JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology

Radaur, India

JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology

Radaur, India
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Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Kumar A.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Kumar M.,National Institute of Nutrition
Annals of Microbiology | Year: 2012

In present investigation, two Lactobacillus isolates, viz. L. plantarum and L. acidophilus, were observed to be able not only to survive but to utilize fruit juices for their cell synthesis, as indicated by a decrease in fruit sugar and pH, and increase in acidity. L. acidophilus was found to consume the sugar at a faster rate than L. plantarum, although the fall in sugar and pH and increase in acidity was faster during the first 24 h and became a little slower during the next 48 h, which could be due to the accumulation of too much acid during the initial 24 h of fermentation. Still, both cultures were found to be able to survive in fermented juices with high acidity and low pH. Therefore, it could be concluded that such probiotic-fortified fruit juices could certainly be exploited as a medium for the delivery of probiotics, and could be used as a functional healthy beverage to promote better health and nutrition of the population, especially for those who are allergic or intolerant to milk-based products. © 2012 Springer-Verlag and the University of Milan.


Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Rana R.,Lovely Professional University | Kumar A.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Kumar M.,National Dairy Research Institute | And 4 more authors.
Food and Function | Year: 2011

It has been well recognized that dietary proteins provide a rich source of biologically active peptides. Today, milk proteins are considered the most important source of bioactive peptides and an increasing number of bioactive peptides have been identified in milk protein hydrolysates and fermented dairy products. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins offer a promising approach for the promotion of health by means of a tailored diet and provide interesting opportunities to the dairy industry for expansion of its field of operation. The potential health benefits of milk protein-derived peptides have been a subject of growing commercial interest in the context of health-promoting functional foods. Hence, these peptides are being incorporated in the form of ingredients in functional and novel foods, dietary supplements and even pharmaceuticals with the purpose of delivering specific health benefits. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Kumar M.,National Dairy Research Institute | Verma V.,National University of Singapore | Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Kumar A.,P.A. College | And 3 more authors.
Gene | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin on aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1) induced hepatocellular carcinoma. In vivo trials were conducted on 200 Wistar rats allocated to eight groups. Rats in the positive control group were given intraperitoneal injection of aflatoxin B 1 at 450μg/kg body weight twice a week for 6weeks. The rats were sacrificed and dissected at 25th week of the experiment, and comet assay was carried out in hepatic cells to assess the genotoxicity or DNA damage. The tumour incidence was decreased by approximately one-third than AFB 1 control group. The expression of c-myc bax, bcl-2, cyclin D1, p53 and rasp-21 genes was also studied. A significant (P<0.05) reduction in DNA damage was observed in probiotic fermented milk with chlorophyllin group as compared to aflatoxin B 1 control group. The c-myc, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and rasp-21 level was found to be highest in AFB 1 control group as compared to the treatment group. The results advocate the enhanced protective potential of probiotic fermented milk and chlorophyllin against AFB 1-induced molecular alterations in hepatic cells during carcinogenesis. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Behare P.V.,National Dairy Research Institute | Singh R.,National Dairy Research Institute | Tomar S.K.,National Dairy Research Institute | Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2010

Sixty-four exopolysaccharide-producing thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from traditionally made Indian fermented milk products. On the basis of morphological and biochemical tests, these isolates were identified as the species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus genera. Initial screening for technological attributes revealed that Streptococcus thermophilus IG16 was a promising isolate, and produced both capsular and ropy polysaccharides at the concentration of 211mg/L. Exopolysaccharide produced by IG16 was a heteropolysaccharide containing rhamnose and galactose in a ratio of 5.3:1 and had a molecular weight of 3.3 × 104 Da. Use of IG16 as a starter culture controlled whey separation and improved viscosity, flavor, consistency, and color and appearance of lassi. Use of IG16 resulted in lassi having optimal acidity, less syneresis, high viscosity, and better scores for flavor, consistency, and color and appearance. © 2010 American Dairy Science Association.


Goel G.,National Dairy Research Institute | Goel G.,Maharishi Markandeshwar University | Kumar A.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Beniwal V.,Maharishi Markandeshwar University | And 3 more authors.
International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation | Year: 2011

Tannins, present in various foods, feeds and forages, have anti-nutritional activity; however, presence of tannase in microorganisms inhabiting rumen and gastrointestinal tract of animals results in detoxification of these tannins. The present investigation was carried out to study the degradation profile of tannins by Enterococcus faecalis and to purify tannase. E. faecalis was observed to degrade tannic acid (1.0% in minimal media) to gallic acid, pyrogallol and resorcinol. Tannase from E. faecalis was purified up to 18.7 folds, with a recovery of 41.7%, using ammonium sulphate precipitation, followed by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-150. The 45 kDa protein had an optimum activity at 40 °C and pH 6.0 at substrate concentration of 0.25 mM methyl gallate. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Nagpal R.,Lovely Professional University | Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Kumar A.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Arora S.,University of Punjab
International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics | Year: 2010

In present study, Lactobacilli were isolated and characterized from various milk products, where out of 25 isolates, 5 lactobacilli strains were screened for probiotic properties viz. tolerance to low pH, high bile salt concentration, cholesterol assimilation, cell aggregation and heat tolerance etc. All the 5 isolates showed comparable cell-surface hydrophobicity, and inhibitory activity against B. cereus, E. coli, S. aureus, and Salmonella spp. However, the values for L. plantarum M5 were significantly higher than that of other isolates. Besides these attributes, it could aho withstand pH 2.5, and 50°C up to 20 min. The results of storage studies showed that storage at -20°C and 5-7°C had no effect on viable count, and it had good viability after 6 weeks of storage. The results suggest that L. plantarum M5 and L. helveticus L3 could be exploited for potential probiotic foods for better nutrition and health. Copyright © 2010 by New Century Health Publishers, LLC.


Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Nagpal R.,Lovely Professional University | Kaur A.,Lovely Professional University
Ecology of Food and Nutrition | Year: 2011

In the present study, five Lactobacillus strains were evaluated for their viability in presence of different prebiotics viz. inulin, oligofructose, lactulose, raftilose, and honey. The viability of lactobacilli was observed before and after 5 weeks of refrigerated storage. The doubling time varied from 5.2 hrs to 9.6 hrs. The lowest doubling time was for Lactobacillus plantarum M5 followed by L. plantarum Ch1 with inulin. Viability of lactobacilli was greatest with inulin. The growth and viability in presence of prebiotics were found to be strain-specific. Hence, it could be concluded that the addition of prebiotics have a significant effect on probiotics, and hence, a combination of suitable Lactobacillus strain(s) with a specific prebiotic could be a viable probiotic-based functional food approach in administering the beneficial bacteria in-vivo. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Nagpal R.,National Dairy Research Institute | Nagpal R.,JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology | Puniya A.K.,National Dairy Research Institute | Sehgal J.P.,National Dairy Research Institute | Singh K.,National Dairy Research Institute
Mycoscience | Year: 2011

In the present study, anaerobic fungi were isolated from different ruminants and non-ruminants; i. e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats, wild bluebulls, elephants, deer, and zebras; and were identified as Anaeromyces, Orpinomyces, Caecomyces, Piromyces, and Neocallimastix sp., based on their morphological characteristics. These isolates possessed significant in vitro hydrolytic enzyme activities; however, an isolate of Caecomyces sp. from elephant was found to exhibit maximum activity, i. e., filter paper cellulase (Fpase; 21.4 mIU/ml), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMCase; 15.1 mIU/ml), cellobiase (37.4 mIU/ml), and xylanase (26.0 mIU/ml). Besides, this isolate also showed the significantly highest ability to digest plant cell-wall contents in vitro. The in vitro dry matter digestibility increased from 45.1 to 48.9% after 48 h of incubation, and the plant cell-wall contents, in terms of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber, decreased from 64.2 to 61.3% and from 31.3 to 29.6%, respectively. These results indicate that such fibrolytic ruminal fungal strains are prevalent in wild herbivores such as elephants, as well as in other ruminants and non-ruminants, and could be exploited as microbial feed additives for improved nutrition and productivity in domesticated ruminants. © 2010 The Mycological Society of Japan and Springer.


PubMed | JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ecology of food and nutrition | Year: 2011

In the present study, five Lactobacillus strains were evaluated for their viability in presence of different prebiotics viz. inulin, oligofructose, lactulose, raftilose, and honey. The viability of lactobacilli was observed before and after 5 weeks of refrigerated storage. The doubling time varied from 5.2 hrs to 9.6 hrs. The lowest doubling time was for Lactobacillus plantarum M5 followed by L. plantarum Ch1 with inulin. Viability of lactobacilli was greatest with inulin. The growth and viability in presence of prebiotics were found to be strain-specific. Hence, it could be concluded that the addition of prebiotics have a significant effect on probiotics, and hence, a combination of suitable Lactobacillus strain(s) with a specific prebiotic could be a viable probiotic-based functional food approach in administering the beneficial bacteria in-vivo.


PubMed | JMIT Institute of Engineering and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Food & function | Year: 2011

It has been well recognized that dietary proteins provide a rich source of biologically active peptides. Today, milk proteins are considered the most important source of bioactive peptides and an increasing number of bioactive peptides have been identified in milk protein hydrolysates and fermented dairy products. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins offer a promising approach for the promotion of health by means of a tailored diet and provide interesting opportunities to the dairy industry for expansion of its field of operation. The potential health benefits of milk protein-derived peptides have been a subject of growing commercial interest in the context of health-promoting functional foods. Hence, these peptides are being incorporated in the form of ingredients in functional and novel foods, dietary supplements and even pharmaceuticals with the purpose of delivering specific health benefits.

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