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Zhang H.-Y.,Jintan Plant Protection and Quarantine Station | Ji M.,Jintan Plant Protection and Quarantine Station | Sun G.-J.,Jintan Plant Protection and Quarantine Station | Sun G.-J.,Yangzhou University | And 5 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Ecology | Year: 2014

In order to reveal the species composition, biodiversity and harmfulness of autumn weeds in tea gardens of different natural environments, management practices, and tea planting time, a survey on species number, density and weed height were conducted in October 2011 and 2012 in hilly regions of southern Jiangsu Province. Based on the survey data and habitat characters, all sampling tea gardens were classified into five habitat groups through cluster analysis. The results showed that significant differences in family, genera and species composition, and in weed community structure and ratios of annual to perennial species were found among the different groups, due to the influence of habitat and management practices. In Groups III and IV, Eleusine indica + Echinochloa crusgalli var. austro-japonensis + Digitaria sanguinalis weed community and D. sanguinalis + Rostellularia procumbens + Acalypha australis + Eleusine indica + Erigeron annus + Conyza canadensis + Oxalis corniculata weed community occurred respectively. In these two groups, main species were more than the other groups, and species composition and community structure were stable and complicated, which may allow the communities to buffer from disturbance and environmental fluctuation. Groups II and V, Leptochloa panicea + C. canadensis + Euphorbia humifusa + Erigeron annus weed communities and Ophiopogon japonicus + C. canadensis + Pieris multifida + Phyllanthus urinaria + Rostellularia procumbens weed communities, had unstable structures and caused little harmfulness. Group I had Digitaria sanguinalis + Erigeron annuus + Echinochloa crusgalli var. austro-japonensis +Eleusine indica +Oxalis corniculata + Acalypha australis weed communities, with biodiversity index values contrary to those of the other groups, while the dominant species predominated the community structure, often causing serious harmfulness. © 2014, Editorial Board of Chinese Journal of Ecology. All rights reserved. Source


Sun G.-J.,Jintan Plant Protection and Quarantine Station | Sun G.-J.,Yangzhou University | Zhang H.-Y.,Jintan Plant Protection and Quarantine Station | Li F.-H.,Jintan Plant Protection and Quarantine Station | And 6 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Ecology | Year: 2015

In order to reveal the regional differences in species composition and biodiversity of autumn weeds in tea gardens under different management practices with different planting time, surveys of weed species, species density and plant height of autumn weeds were conducted in major tea producing areas of Jiangsu Province including Yizheng, Jintan and Yixing on October 2013. The species composition, dominance, species density, life form, biodiversity, and niche breadth of main weeds were analyzed. The results showed that there were 72 species (65 genera belonging to 32 families) in Yizheng tea gardens, 80 species (74 genera belonging to 36 families) in Jintan tea gardens, and 80 species (74 genera belonging to 40 families) in Yixing tea gardens. Digitaria sanguinalis was the most dominant species in all the three tea planting regions. The numbers of weed family, genera and species gradually increased from north to south and the differences were more obvious within longer geographical distance, which was in accordance with the biogeographic pattern that species richness decreases from low latitudes to high latitudes. Niche breadth and interspecific niche overlap values of most major weed species gradually decreased from north to south. Weed diversity gradually enriched from north to south, while weed diversity decreased and the dominant species was found more obvious with the increase of latitude. The proportion of perennial weeds gradually increased while annual and biennial weeds gradually decreased from north to south. © 2015, editorial Board of Chinese Journal of Ecology. All rights reserved. Source

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