Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute

Jiangxi, China

Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute

Jiangxi, China

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Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Wu Z.-C.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Prediction of protein subcellular localization is a challenging problem, particularly when the system concerned contains both singleplex and multiplex proteins. In this paper, by introducing the "multi-label scale" and hybridizing the information of gene ontology with the sequential evolution information, a novel predictor called iLoc-Gneg is developed for predicting the subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins with both single-location and multiple-location sites. For facilitating comparison, the same stringent benchmark dataset used to estimate the accuracy of Gneg-mPLoc was adopted to demonstrate the power of iLoc-Gneg. The dataset contains 1,392 Gram-negative bacterial proteins classified into the following eight locations: (1) cytoplasm, (2) extracellular, (3) fimbrium, (4) flagellum, (5) inner membrane, (6) nucleoid, (7) outer membrane, and (8) periplasm. Of the 1,392 proteins, 1,328 are each with only one subcellular location and the other 64 are each with two subcellular locations, but none of the proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset (subcellular location). It was observed that the overall success rate by jackknife test on such a stringent benchmark dataset by iLoc-Gneg was over 91%, which is about 6% higher than that by Gneg-mPLoc. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Gneg is freely accessible to the public at http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Gneg. Meanwhile, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results. Furthermore, for the user's convenience, the iLoc-Gneg web-server also has the function to accept the batch job submission, which is not available in the existing version of Gneg-mPLoc web-server. It is anticipated that iLoc-Gneg may become a useful high throughput tool for Molecular Cell Biology, Proteomics, System Biology, and Drug Development. © 2011 Xiao et al.


Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Wu Z.-C.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Predicting protein subcellular localization is an important and difficult problem, particularly when query proteins may have the multiplex character, i.e., simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing protein subcellular location predictor can only be used to deal with the single-location or "singleplex" proteins. Actually, multiple-location or "multiplex" proteins should not be ignored because they usually posses some unique biological functions worthy of our special notice. By introducing the "multi-labeled learning" and "accumulation-layer scale", a new predictor, called iLoc-Euk, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both singleplex and multiplex proteins. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Euk on a benchmark dataset of eukaryotic proteins classified into the following 22 location sites: (1) acrosome, (2) cell membrane, (3) cell wall, (4) centriole, (5) chloroplast, (6) cyanelle, (7) cytoplasm, (8) cytoskeleton, (9) endoplasmic reticulum, (10) endosome, (11) extracellular, (12) Golgi apparatus, (13) hydrogenosome, (14) lysosome, (15) melanosome, (16) microsome (17) mitochondrion, (18) nucleus, (19) peroxisome, (20) spindle pole body, (21) synapse, and (22) vacuole, where none of proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. The overall success rate thus obtained by iLoc-Euk was 79%, which is significantly higher than that by any of the existing predictors that also have the capacity to deal with such a complicated and stringent system. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Euk is freely accessible to the public at the web-site http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Euk. It is anticipated that iLoc-Euk may become a useful bioinformatics tool for Molecular Cell Biology, Proteomics, System Biology, and Drug Development Also, its novel approach will further stimulate the development of predicting other protein attributes. © 2011 Chou et al.


Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Wu Z.-C.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute
Molecular BioSystems | Year: 2012

Although numerous efforts have been made for predicting the subcellular locations of proteins based on their sequence information, it still remains as a challenging problem, particularly when query proteins may have the multiplex character, i.e., they simultaneously exist, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing methods were established on the assumption: a protein has one, and only one, subcellular location. Actually, recent evidence has indicated an increasing number of human proteins having multiple subcellular locations. This kind of multiplex proteins should not be ignored because they may bear some special biological functions worthy of our attention. Based on the accumulation-label scale, a new predictor, called iLoc-Hum, was developed for identifying the subcellular localization of human proteins with both single and multiple location sites. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Hum on a benchmark dataset of human proteins that covers the following 14 location sites: centrosome, cytoplasm, cytoskeleton, endoplasmic reticulum, endosome, extracellular, Golgi apparatus, lysosome, microsome, mitochondrion, nucleus, peroxisome, plasma membrane, and synapse, where some proteins belong to two, three or four locations but none has 25% or higher pairwise sequence identity to any other in the same subset. For such a complicated and stringent system, the overall success rate achieved by iLoc-Hum was 76%, which is remarkably higher than that by any of the existing predictors that also have the capacity to deal with this kind of system. Further comparisons were also made via two independent datasets; all indicated that the success rates by iLoc-Hum were even more significantly higher than its counterparts. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Hum is freely accessible to the public at http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/ iLoc-Hum or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iLoc-Hum. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results by choosing either a straightforward submission or a batch submission, without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Wu Z.-C.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Wu Z.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute
Molecular BioSystems | Year: 2011

Predicting protein subcellular localization is a challenging problem, particularly when query proteins may simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing methods can only be used to deal with the single-location proteins. Actually, multiple-location proteins should not be ignored because they usually bear some special functions worthy of our notice. By introducing the "multi-labeled learning" approach, a new predictor, called iLoc-Plant, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both single- and multiple-location plant proteins. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Plant on a benchmark dataset of plant proteins classified into the following 12 location sites: (1) cell membrane, (2) cell wall, (3) chloroplast, (4) cytoplasm, (5) endoplasmic reticulum, (6) extracellular, (7) Golgi apparatus, (8) mitochondrion, (9) nucleus, (10) peroxisome, (11) plastid, and (12) vacuole, where some proteins belong to two or three locations but none has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. The overall success rate thus obtained by iLoc-Plant was 71%, which is remarkably higher than those achieved by any existing predictors that also have the capacity to deal with such a stringent and complicated plant protein system. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Plant is freely accessible to the public at the web-site http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Plant or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iLoc-Plant. Moreover, for the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematic equations presented in this paper for its integrity. It is anticipated that iLoc-Plant may become a useful bioinformatics tool for Molecular Cell Biology, Proteomics, Systems Biology, and Drug Development. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Wang P.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute
Molecular BioSystems | Year: 2011

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the most frequent targets of therapeutic drugs. With the avalanche of newly generated protein sequences in the post genomic age, to expedite the process of drug discovery, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method to rapidly identify GPCRs and their types. A new predictor was developed by hybridizing two different modes of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC): the functional domain PseAAC and the low-frequency Fourier spectrum PseAAC. The new predictor is called GPCR-2L, where "2L" means that it is a two-layer predictor: the 1st layer prediction engine is to identify a query protein as GPCR or not; if it is, the prediction will be automatically continued to further identify it as belonging to one of the following six types: (1) rhodopsin-like (Class A), (2) secretin-like (Class B), (3) metabotropic glutamate/pheromone (Class C), (4) fungal pheromone (Class D), (5) cAMP receptor (Class E), or (6) frizzled/smoothened family (Class F). The overall success rate of GPCR-2L in identifying proteins as GPCRs or non-GPCRs is over 97.2%, while identifying GPCRs among their six types is over 97.8%. Such high success rates were derived by the rigorous jackknife cross-validation on a stringent benchmark dataset, in which none of the included proteins had ≥40% pairwise sequence identity to any other protein in a same subset. As a user-friendly web-server, GPCR-2L is freely accessible to the public at http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/GPCR-2L, by which one can obtain the 2-level results in about 20 s for a query protein sequence of 500 amino acids. The longer the sequence is, the more time it may usually need. The high success rates reported here indicate that it is a quite effective approach to identify GPCRs and their types with the functional domain information and the low-frequency Fourier spectrum analysis. It is anticipated that GPCR-2L may become a useful tool for both basic research and drug development in the areas related to GPCRs. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.


Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Wu Z.-C.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute
Journal of Theoretical Biology | Year: 2011

In the last two decades or so, although many computational methods were developed for predicting the subcellular locations of proteins according to their sequence information, it is still remains as a challenging problem, particularly when the system concerned contains both single- and multiple-location proteins. Also, among the existing methods, very few were developed specialized for dealing with viral proteins, those generated by viruses. Actually, knowledge of the subcellular localization of viral proteins in a host cell or virus-infected cell is very important because it is closely related to their destructive tendencies and consequences. In this paper, by introducing the "multi-label scale" and by hybridizing the gene ontology information with the sequential evolution information, a predictor called iLoc-Virus is developed. It can be utilized to identify viral proteins among the following six locations: (1) viral capsid, (2) host cell membrane, (3) host endoplasmic reticulum, (4) host cytoplasm, (5) host nucleus, and (6) secreted. The iLoc-Virus predictor not only can more accurately predict the location sites of viral proteins in a host cell, but also have the capacity to deal with virus proteins having more than one location. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Virus is freely accessible to the public at http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Virus. Meanwhile, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results. Furthermore, for the users convenience, the iLoc-Virus web-server also has the function to accept the batch job submission. It is anticipated that iLoc-Virus may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Wang P.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Nuclear receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant classes of transcriptional regulators in animals. They regulate diverse functions, such as homeostasis, reproduction, development and metabolism. Therefore, NRs are a very important target for drug development. Nuclear receptors form a superfamily of phylogenetically related proteins and have been subdivided into different subfamilies due to their domain diversity. In this study, a two-level predictor, called NR-2L, was developed that can be used to identify a query protein as a nuclear receptor or not based on its sequence information alone; if it is, the prediction will be automatically continued to further identify it among the following seven subfamilies: (1) thyroid hormone like (NR1), (2) HNF4-like (NR2), (3) estrogen like, (4) nerve growth factor IB-like (NR4), (5) fushi tarazu-F1 like (NR5), (6) germ cell nuclear factor like (NR6), and NR-2L knirps like (NR0). The identification was made by the Fuzzy K nearest neighbor (FK-NN) classifier based on the pseudo amino acid composition formed by incorporating various physicochemical and statistical features derived from the protein sequences, such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, complexity factor, and low-frequency Fourier spectrum components. As a demonstration, it was shown through some benchmark datasets derived from the NucleaRDB and UniProt with low redundancy that the overall success rates achieved by the jackknife test were about 93% and 89% in the first and second level, respectively. The high success rates indicate that the novel two-level predictor can be a useful vehicle for identifying NRs and their subfamilies. As a user-friendly web server, NR-2L is freel accessible at either http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/NR2L or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/NR2L. Each job submitted to NR-2L can contain up to 500 query protein sequences and be finished in less than 2 minutes. The less the number of query proteins is, the shorter the time will usually be. All the program codes for NR-2L are available for non-commercial purpose upon request. © 2011 Wang et al.


Lin W.-Z.,Donghua University | Lin W.-Z.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Fang J.-A.,Donghua University | Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | And 2 more authors.
Molecular BioSystems | Year: 2013

Predicting protein subcellular localization is a challenging problem, particularly when query proteins have multi-label features meaning that they may simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing methods can only be used to deal with the single-label proteins. Actually, multi-label proteins should not be ignored because they usually bear some special function worthy of in-depth studies. By introducing the "multi-label learning" approach, a new predictor, called iLoc-Animal, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both single- and multi-label animal (metazoan except human) proteins. Meanwhile, to measure the prediction quality of a multi-label system in a rigorous way, five indices were introduced; they are "Absolute- True", "Absolute-False" (or Hamming-Loss"), "Accuracy", "Precision", and "Recall". As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Animal on a benchmark dataset of animal proteins classified into the following 20 location sites: (1) acrosome, (2) cell membrane, (3) centriole, (4) centrosome, (5) cell cortex, (6) cytoplasm, (7) cytoskeleton, (8) endoplasmic reticulum, (9) endosome, (10) extracellular, (11) Golgi apparatus, (12) lysosome, (13) mitochondrion, (14) melanosome, (15) microsome, (16) nucleus, (17) peroxisome, (18) plasma membrane, (19) spindle, and (20) synapse, where many proteins belong to two or more locations. For such a complicated system, the outcomes achieved by iLoc-Animal for all the aforementioned five indices were quite encouraging, indicating that the predictor may become a useful tool in this area. It has not escaped our notice that the multi-label approach and the rigorous measurement metrics can also be used to investigate many other multi-label problems in molecular biology. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Animal is freely accessible to the public at the web-site http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iLoc-Animal. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Xiao X.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Xiao X.,Gordon Life Science Institute | Wang P.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute | Chou K.-C.,Gordon Life Science Institute
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Nuclear receptors (NRs) form a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a wide variety of biological processes, such as homeostasis, reproduction, development, and metabolism. Human genome contains 48 genes encoding NRs. These receptors have become one of the most important targets for therapeutic drug development. According to their different action mechanisms or functions, NRs have been classified into seven subfamilies. With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the postgenomic age, we are facing the following challenging problems. Given an uncharacterized protein sequence, how can we identify whether it is a nuclear receptor? If it is, what subfamily it belongs to? To address these problems, we developed a predictor called iNR-PhysChem in which the protein samples were expressed by a novel mode of pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) whose components were derived from a physical-chemical matrix via a series of auto-covariance and cross-covariance transformations. It was observed that the overall success rate achieved by iNR-PhysChem was over 98% in identifying NRs or non-NRs, and over 92% in identifying NRs among the following seven subfamilies: NR1-thyroid hormone like, NR2-HNF4-like, NR3-estrogen like, NR4-nerve growth factor IB-like, NR5-fushi tarazu-F1 like, NR6-germ cell nuclear factor like, and NR0-knirps like. These rates were derived by the jackknife tests on a stringent benchmark dataset in which none of protein sequences included has ≥60% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. As a user-friendly web-server,iNR-PhysChem is freely accessible to the public at either http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-PhysChem or http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iNR-PhysChem. Also a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved in developing the predictor. It is anticipated that iNR-PhysChem may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug design. © 2012 Xiao et al.


Zou H.-L.,Jing de Zhen Ceramic Institute
Journal of Membrane Biology | Year: 2014

Membrane protein is an important composition of cell membrane. Given a membrane protein sequence, how can we identify its type(s) is very important because the type keeps a close correlation with its functions. According to previous studies, membrane protein can be divided into the following eight types: single-pass type I, single-pass type II, single-pass type III, single-pass type IV, multipass, lipid-anchor, GPI-anchor, peripheral membrane protein. With the avalanche of newly found protein sequences in the post-genomic age, it is urgent to develop an automatic and effective computational method to rapid and reliable prediction of the types of membrane proteins. At present, most of the existing methods were based on the assumption that one membrane protein only belongs to one type. Actually, a membrane protein may simultaneously exist at two or more different functional types. In this study, a new method by hybridizing the pseudo amino acid composition with multi-label algorithm called LIFT (multi-label learning with label-specific features) was proposed to predict the functional types both singleplex and multiplex animal membrane proteins. Experimental result on a stringent benchmark dataset of membrane proteins by jackknife test show that the absolute-true obtained was 0.6342, indicating that our approach is quite promising. It may become a useful high-through tool, or at least play a complementary role to the existing predictors in identifying functional types of membrane proteins. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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