Institute of Cardiovascular Disease General Hospital of Jinan Military Region

Jinan, China

Institute of Cardiovascular Disease General Hospital of Jinan Military Region

Jinan, China
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Zhao J.-Y.,Fudan University | Zhao J.-Y.,China Institute of Technology | Qiao B.,Institute of Cardiovascular Disease General Hospital of Jinan Military Region | Duan W.-Y.,Institute of Cardiovascular Disease General Hospital of Jinan Military Region | And 9 more authors.
European Heart Journal | Year: 2014

AimsElevated homocysteine levels are known to be a risk factor for congenital heart disease (CHD), but the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown. During early embryonic development, homocysteine removal is dictated exclusively by the MTR activity. To examine the role of MTR in CHD risk, we identified genetic variants in MTR and investigated the mechanisms that affect its expression levels and that increase the risk of CHD in Chinese populations.Methods and resultsThe association between regulatory variants of the MTR gene and CHD was examined in three independent case-control studies in a total of 2340 patients with CHD and 2270 controls. The functional consequences of these variants were demonstrated using dual-luciferase assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), electrophoretic mobility shift assays, surface plasma resonance, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and bisulfite sequencing, as well as by a group of predicted microRNAs using a gene reporter system. Two regulatory variants of MTR, -186T>G and +905G>A, were associated with an increased risk of CHD in both the separate and combined case-control studies (-186GG P = 1.32 × 10-9; +905AA P = 6.35 × 10 -14). Compared with the major allele, the -186G allele exhibited significantly lower promoter activity, decreased hnRNA and mRNA levels, reduced transcription factor binding affinity, and a more highly methylated promoter. The +905A allele exhibited a statistically stronger binding affinity to functional microRNAs that down regulate MTR expression at the translational level. Both of the minor alleles were correlated with elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations, indicating a genetic component for hyperhomocysteinaemia.ConclusionsRegulatory variants of the MTR gene increase CHD risk by reducing MTR expression and inducing the homocysteine accumulation and elevation. © The Author 2013.


Wang E.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Wang E.,Fudan University | Sun S.,Fudan University | Qiao B.,Institute of Cardiovascular Disease General Hospital of Jinan Military Region | And 10 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most prevalent developmental anomalies and the leading cause of noninfectious morbidity and mortality in newborns. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, the etiology of CHD remains largely unknown. GATA4 is a highly conserved transcription factor that regulates a variety of physiological processes and has been extensively studied, particularly on its role in heart development. With the combination of TBX5 and MEF2C, GATA4 can reprogram postnatal fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes directly. In the past decade, a variety of GATA4 mutations were identified and these findings originally came from familial CHD pedigree studies. Given that familial and sporadic CHD cases allegedly share a basic genetic basis, we explore the GATA4 mutations in different types of CHD. In this study, via direct sequencing of the GATA4 coding region and exon-intron boundaries in 384 sporadic Chinese CHD patients, we identified 12 heterozygous non-synonymous mutations, among which 8 mutations were only found in CHD patients when compared with 957 controls. Six of these non-synonymous mutations have not been previously reported. Subsequent functional analyses revealed that the transcriptional activity, subcellular localization and DNA binding affinity of some mutant GATA4 proteins were significantly altered. Our results expand the spectrum of GATA4 mutations linked to cardiac defects. Together with the newly reported mutations, approximately 110 non-synonymous mutations have currently been identified in GATA4. Our future analysis will explore why the evolutionarily conserved GATA4 appears to be hypermutable. © 2013 Wang et al.


PubMed | Fudan University, CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences and Institute of Cardiovascular Disease General Hospital of Jinan Military Region
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Genome-wide association studies on components of the one-carbon metabolic pathway revealed that human vitamin B12 levels could be significantly influenced by variations in the fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2), cubilin (CUBN), and transcobalamin-I (TCN1) genes. An altered vitamin B12 level is an important factor that disturbs the homeostasis of the folate metabolism pathway, which in turn can potentially lead to the development of congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, we investigated the association between the variants of vitamin B12-related genes and CHD in Han Chinese populations.Six variants of the vitamin B12-related genes were selected for analysis in two independent case-control studies, with a total of 868 CHD patients and 931 controls. The variant rs11254363 of the CUBN gene was associated with a decreased risk of developing CHD in both the separate and combined case-control studies. Combined samples from the two cohorts had a significant decrease in CHD risk for the G allele (OR=0.48, P=1.710) and AG+GG genotypes (OR=0.49, P=410), compared with the wild-type A allele and AA genotype, respectively.Considering the G allele of variant rs11254363 of the CUBN gene was associated with an increased level of circulating vitamin B12. This result suggested that the carriers of the G allele would benefit from the protection offered by the high vitamin B12 concentration during critical heart development stages. This finding shed light on the unexpected role of CUBN in CHD development and highlighted the interplay of diet, genetics, and human birth defects.

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