Changchun, China
Changchun, China

Jilin University is a leading national research university under the direct jurisdiction of China's Ministry of Education.Located in Changchun, the capital city of Jilin Province in Northeast China, the university has seven campuses in six districts which are home to thirty-nine colleges covering thirteen academic disciplines, including philosophy, international relations, economics, law, literature, education, history, science, engineering, agriculture, medicine, management, and military science. The University has thirteen disciplinary areas, six national key laboratories, and seven national bases for the development of basic science. Other resources include five research bases for humanities and social science, eleven key laboratories sponsored by the Ministry of Education and eleven by other ministries of Chinese government.Jilin University is one of the most prestigious "Top 10" universities in China, and has several research projects in automobile engineering, chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering and biology. JLU also provides undergraduate and graduate programs in law, literature, philosophy, medicine and veterinary science. It is one of the key universities involved in China's Project 985, Project 211 and Project 2011.Jilin University is a comprehensive and national key university. JLU offers a variety of degree programs. It has now 115 undergraduate programs, 192 Master's degree program, 105 doctoral degree programs, and seventeen post-doctoral programs. In 2003 the university enrolled 59,000 full-time students, including more than 10,000 graduate students. At present there are 6,540 faculty members, with twenty members of Chinese Academy of science and Chinese Academy of Engineering, 1270 full professors, and 1652 associate professors. Wikipedia.


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The present invention provides an adulterated peanut oil detector and an adulterated peanut oil detection method, and pertains to the technical domain of product analysis. The detector comprises a casing, a LCD and Return key, Enter key, Up key, Down key, a power switch, a power socket, and a USB interface arranged on the casing, and a microprocessor and a power supply unit mounted in the casing and electrically connected to the components on the casing, wherein, a module cover is arranged on the top surface of the casing, and a pretreatment module and a detection module are mounted in the space under the module cover. The pretreatment module comprises a heating body and cuvette slots, and the detection module comprises an axial fan, a radiating plate, a refrigerating plate, and cuvette slots. The detection method comprises sample preheating procedure and slow refrigeration procedure. The detector and method provided in the present invention can quickly and easily detect whether the peanut oil sample is adulterated and the percentage of adulteration, and is applicable to quick on-spot detection of rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, maize oil, cotton oil, palm oil, and soybean oil, etc. admixed in peanut oil.


The present invention provides an adulterated peanut oil detector and an adulterated peanut oil detection method, and pertains to the technical domain of product analysis. The detector comprises a casing, a LCD and Return key, Enter key, Up key, Down key, a power switch, a power socket, and a USB interface arranged on the casing, and a microprocessor and a power supply unit mounted in the casing and electrically connected to the components on the casing, wherein, a module cover is arranged on the top surface of the casing, and a pretreatment module and a detection module are mounted in the space under the module cover. The pretreatment module comprises a heating body and cuvette slots, and the detection module comprises an axial fan, a radiating plate, a refrigerating plate, and cuvette slots. The detection method comprises sample preheating procedure and slow refrigeration procedure. The detector and method provided in the present invention can quickly and easily detect whether the peanut oil sample is adulterated and the percentage of adulteration, and is applicable to quick on-spot detection of rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, maize oil, cotton oil, palm oil, and soybean oil, etc. admixed in peanut oil.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

SPOKANE, Wash. - For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues. To develop the treatment, a team led by Zhenjia Wang, an assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, worked at the microscopic scale using a nanotherapeutic particle so small that 1,000 of them would fit across the width of a hair. By attaching a nanoscale particle to an infection-fighting white blood cell, the team showed they can get a drug past the armor of blood vessels that typically shield a tumor. This has been a major challenge in nanotechnology drug delivery. The researchers reported on the technique in the latest issue of the journal Advanced Materials. Working with colleagues in Spokane and China, Wang implanted a tumor on the flank of a mouse commonly chosen as a model for human diseases. The tumor was exposed to near-infrared light, causing an inflammation that released proteins to attract white blood cells, called neutrophils, into the tumor. The researchers then injected the mouse with gold nanoparticles treated with antibodies that mediate the union of the nanoparticles and neutrophils. When the tumor was exposed to infrared light, the light's interaction with the gold nanoparticles produced heat that killed the tumor cells, Wang said. In the future, therapists could attach an anticancer drug like doxorubicin to the nanoparticle. This could let them deliver the drug directly to the tumor and avoid damaging nearby tissues, Wang said. "We have developed a new approach to deliver therapeutics into tumors using the white blood cells of our body," Wang said. "This will be applied to deliver many anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin, and we hope that it could increase the efficacy of cancer therapies compared to other delivery systems." Wang and Chu's colleagues on the research are postdoctoral researcher Dafeng Chu, Ph.D. student Xinyue Dong, Jingkai Gu of Jilin University and Jingkai Gu of the University of Macau. The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health. The research is in keeping with WSU's Grand Challenges that focus on areas of research addressing some of society's most complex issues. The study is particularly relevant to the challenge of sustaining health and its theme of treating disease.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

For the first time, Washington State University researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues. To develop the treatment, a team led by Zhenjia Wang, an assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, worked at the microscopic scale using a nanotherapeutic particle so small that 1,000 of them would fit across the width of a hair. By attaching a nanoscale particle to an infection-fighting white blood cell, the team showed they can get a drug past the armor of blood vessels that typically shield a tumor. This has been a major challenge in nanotechnology drug delivery. The researchers reported on the technique in the latest issue of the journal Advanced Materials. Working with colleagues in Spokane and China, Wang implanted a tumor on the flank of a mouse commonly chosen as a model for human diseases. The tumor was exposed to near-infrared light, causing an inflammation that released proteins to attract white blood cells, called neutrophils, into the tumor. The researchers then injected the mouse with gold nanoparticles treated with antibodies that mediate the union of the nanoparticles and neutrophils. When the tumor was exposed to infrared light, the light’s interaction with the gold nanoparticles produced heat that killed the tumor cells, Wang says. In the future, therapists could attach an anticancer drug like doxorubicin to the nanoparticle. This could let them deliver the drug directly to the tumor and avoid damaging nearby tissues, Wang says. “We have developed a new approach to deliver therapeutics into tumors using the white blood cells of our body,” Wang says. “This will be applied to deliver many anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin, and we hope that it could increase the efficacy of cancer therapies compared to other delivery systems.” Wang and Chu’s colleagues on the research are postdoctoral researcher Dafeng Chu, Ph.D. student Xinyue Dong, Jingkai Gu of Jilin University, and Jingkai Gu of the University of Macau. The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health. The research is in keeping with WSU’s Grand Challenges that focus on areas of research addressing some of society’s most complex issues. The study is particularly relevant to the challenge of sustaining health and its theme of treating disease.


Patent
Changchun Jiyanghuaxin Science, Technology Co. and Jilin University | Date: 2015-11-19

The present invention relates to a slider driving mechanism on a CNC assembly machine for assembled camshaft. The mechanism includes a servo motor (1), the host frame (5), ball screw (6), linear guides (9) and the slider body (8), wherein, the servo motor (1), ball screw (6) and linear guides (9) are mounted vertically on the host frame (5). The servo motor (1) connects with the ball screw. The slider body (8) connects with both the ball screw (6) and the linear guides (9). It is driven by a ball screw (6) and moves along a linear guides (9) in the vertical direction. The present invention is novel. It not only can greatly improve the assembly speed of cam, hexahedron on assembled camshaft and improve productivity, but also can eliminate complex gear system. It makes the manufacturing and processing more simple. The installation is also more convenient. It can further improve product quality and manufacturing precision of assembled camshaft.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

For the first time, Washington State University researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues. To develop the treatment, a team led by Zhenjia Wang, an assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, worked at the microscopic scale using a nanotherapeutic particle so small that 1,000 of them would fit across the width of a hair. By attaching a nanoscale particle to an infection-fighting white blood cell, the team showed they can get a drug past the armor of blood vessels that typically shield a tumor. This has been a major challenge in nanotechnology drug delivery. The researchers reported on the technique in the latest issue of the journal Advanced Materials. Working with colleagues in Spokane and China, Wang implanted a tumor on the flank of a mouse commonly chosen as a model for human diseases. The tumor was exposed to near-infrared light, causing an inflammation that released proteins to attract white blood cells, called neutrophils, into the tumor. The researchers then injected the mouse with gold nanoparticles treated with antibodies that mediate the union of the nanoparticles and neutrophils. When the tumor was exposed to infrared light, the light’s interaction with the gold nanoparticles produced heat that killed the tumor cells, Wang says. In the future, therapists could attach an anticancer drug like doxorubicin to the nanoparticle. This could let them deliver the drug directly to the tumor and avoid damaging nearby tissues, Wang says. “We have developed a new approach to deliver therapeutics into tumors using the white blood cells of our body,” Wang says. “This will be applied to deliver many anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin, and we hope that it could increase the efficacy of cancer therapies compared to other delivery systems.” Wang and Chu’s colleagues on the research are postdoctoral researcher Dafeng Chu, Ph.D. student Xinyue Dong, Jingkai Gu of Jilin University, and Jingkai Gu of the University of Macau. The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health. The research is in keeping with WSU’s Grand Challenges that focus on areas of research addressing some of society’s most complex issues. The study is particularly relevant to the challenge of sustaining health and its theme of treating disease.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Researchers have developed a process to make light-emitting diodes by spraying a substrate with quantum dots (ACS Photonics 2017, DOI: 10.1021/acsphotonics.7b00216). The quantum-dot LEDs (QLEDs) are 100 times as bright and efficient as similar devices, the researchers say. The process could someday be used to mass-produce inexpensive, vibrant, and flexible displays. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that emit a single wavelength when stimulated by electricity or light. This pure color can be tuned by changing the size or composition of the nanocrystals. In some electronic displays on the market today, quantum dots convert blue light from a conventional LED into red and green light, needed for a full-color display. But engineers want to make true QLED displays in which quantum dots at each pixel are electrically triggered to emit each of those three colors. Such displays should be rich, bright, and energy efficient. The question is how to make QLEDs on large areas. A QLED contains quantum dots sandwiched between a layer that transports negatively charged electrons and one that transports positively charged holes. To make these various layers, researchers coat glass or plastic substrates with layers of charge-ferrying organic polymers and quantum dots using vacuum deposition or spin-coating. But the vacuum method is expensive and complicated, and it is difficult to make high-quality films over large areas with spin-coating. “These are not suitable for industry-scale production,” says Wenfa Xie, a professor of electronic science & engineering at Jilin University. Spraying is a much simpler and cheaper way to coat large areas, including flexible plastic sheets. So Xie, Hanzhuang Zhang, and their colleagues created prototype 5-mm2 QLEDs by spraying a series of three nanoparticle solutions onto a glass substrate, depositing one layer at a time. For this, they used an ultrasonic spray machine, which vibrates to break down a liquid into tiny droplets and releases them from a nozzle as an ultrafine spray. The quantum dots were made of cadmium selenide-cadmium sulfide cores and zinc sulfide shells, which glow green when excited with electricity. Xie and his colleagues chose inorganic metal oxides as charge-transport layers instead of organic polymers because organic materials don’t last long under air and humidity and require expensive encapsulation. The team used zinc oxide nanoparticles for the electron-transporting layer and nickel oxide nanoparticles for the hole-transporting layer. To boost efficiency, Xie and his colleagues sprayed a layer of aluminum oxide between the nickel oxide and quantum dot layers, which helps to quash charge-trapping defect sites in the nickel oxide. The team produced green QLEDs with an efficiency of 20.5 candelas per ampere and a brightness of more than 20,000 cd/m2. These numbers are two orders of magnitude greater than previously reported QLEDs made with all inorganic materials, Xie says. The process could easily be used to make QLEDs of other colors. But the devices still need to catch up in brightness and lifetime with organic polymer-based QLEDs, which can be twice as efficient and last 10 times as long. Xie says that his team is now trying to improve both traits by engineering better quantum-dot and hole-transport layers. Paul Holloway, a materials science & engineering professor at the University of Florida, says the spray process is unique for making QLEDs. Manufacturers would still need to figure out how to pattern the QLEDs to make pixels for displays, he adds, but there are many ways to do that.


Li Y.,Jilin University | Yu J.,Jilin University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2014

Spheres are attracted to each other when they are close, which ensures the close packing of spheres. Spheres also repel each other strongly if they overlap, ensuring the hardness of the spheres. At the beginning of the packing procedure, a small number of hexagonal close packed spheres are placed into the zeolite framework without overlapping any framework atom. An excess of spheres are supplied outside the unit cell. The concept of natural tiling can be one of the solutions. According to the theory of tiling, a three dimensional net can be decomposed into a number of face sharing, edge-sharing, and vertex-sharing three-dimensional polyhedral tiles. The way all of the tiles assemble together is the tiling of the net. By comparing the T-ring graphs corresponding to different probes, one can easily generate preliminary conclusions about the selectivity of mixtures of guest species corresponding to a specific zeolite framework.


Liu Z.-Q.,Jilin University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2010

Researchers conducted investigations to develop chemical methods for evaluating antioxidant ability. The researchers also introduced some biological materials as experimental materials in evaluating antioxidant capacity chemically. The first scheme demonstrated the mode for exploring antioxidant capacity who basis contained four factors. Substrates were compounds that were susceptible to oxidation and the microenvironment imitated the biological surroundings. The applications of erythrocytes, DNA, and LDL combined the substrate with the microenvironment. Treatment of the results from these biological samples with chemical kinetics revealed molecular information on the biological samples. Metal ions, and other oxidants were also applied to initiate the oxidation of chemical agents or biological samples to imitate oxidative stress, radical initiators, and UV radiation.


Liu Z.-Q.,Jilin University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2012

The chemistry, biosynthesis, analysis, and tonic effects of ginsenosides were reviewed to gather information about ginseng as a resource for natural antioxidants. Investigations revealed that anticarcinogenic, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antiatherosclerotic, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, antistress, and anticancer activities of ginseng were due to the action of ginsenosides. The pharmacological action of ginseng was related to the abilities of ginsenosides to regulate enzyme expression, and more individual ginsenosides were needed for comparing pharmacological activity and for exploring the structure-activity relationships. Some chemicals, such as CO 2 and jasmonic acid were found to increase the contents of ginsenosides and other antioxidants. It was also observed that the treatment of Panax notoginseng with 2-hydroxyethyl jasmonate in a bioreactor increased the activities of protopanaxdiol 6-hydroxylase and Rd glucosyltransferase and changed the ratios of Rb/Rg and Rb1/Rd.

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