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GENEVA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--At this year’s World Health Assembly, GE Healthcare and Women in Global Health, a movement that strives for greater gender equality in global health leadership, are joining forces to honor and celebrate women in global health. Today, women make up 75 percent of the global healthcare workforce in many regions1 and contribute nearly $3 trillion to the industry. But too often their contributions go unpaid and unrecognized – and stories of their impact go untold. As we seek to increase the numbers of women in leadership in the field of global health, we are highlighting the valuable work and achievements of these women. Research has shown that women and girls are disproportionately affected by disease2, and that when women are in leadership roles, they will make decisions that are more supportive of women and children and lead to improved women’s health outcomes.3 Improving women’s health is a central focus of the global health community4 and advancing gender equality is therefore seen by many as a means of benefitting communities and public health. “These women are working tirelessly to improve global health with dedication and passion to champion better healthcare for all. To change the face of global health for the future, we are committed to help recognize, develop and grow women’s leadership – and to start by sharing the stories of women leading the charge,” said Terri Bresenham, President and CEO of Sustainable Healthcare Solutions, GE Healthcare. “At GE Healthcare, we place tremendous value on training and education of healthcare professionals across emerging markets and we are starting from the frontlines by ensuring that 50 percent of our training places are available for women.” "Investing in girls and women results in greater societal return. It is acknowledged that women are underpaid and under-recognized in many workforces. In the global health field, it becomes more pervasive as women are at the front lines, taking on the toughest health challenges to ensure there are healthier communities, yet they are not represented in decision-making positions. As we celebrate women in global health, we are taking a moment to recognize women's contributions to health and highlight their achievements. Through shining a light on the great leaders we have in the field, we aim to inspire everyone to do more to advance gender equality for the benefit of communities and public health all over the world,” said Roopa Dhatt, Director and Co-founder of Women in Global Health. The nominees have been selected across a number of focus areas and countries: Dr. Sharmila Anand (India) – Dr. Anand leads Santosh Educational & Health Care Pvt Ltd. (SEHPL), a social enterprise which focuses on developing the next generation of healthcare professionals and leaders who can transform the way healthcare is delivered in India. She works on various initiatives that focus on enhancing the skills of people in healthcare at various levels. Sreytouch Vong (Cambodia) – Vong is a research fellow, affiliated with ReBUILD and RinGs consortium which deals with gender analysis. She has engaged in extensive health system research and public health research, that focuses on improving health financing, gender and human resources, and nutrition within healthcare systems. Vong is also working to form a group of health researchers to bridge gaps between users of evidence and the research community in Cambodia. Elvira Dayrit (Philippines) – Dayrit has worked in the Philippine Department of Health for 27 years. She is dedicated to making government health programs work effectively, efficiently, and in a wide enough scale to create health impact. She is currently the Bureau Director for Health Human Resources where she works to streamline the Bureau. Dr. Semakaleng Phafol (Lesotho) – Dr. Phafol is a Lesotho Professional Nurse and Education Specialist with more than 25 years of experience in nursing practice, nursing education, community/public health and management of clinical services. She has helped to establish and strengthen clinical placements for over 1000 nursing midwifery students at over 60 health centres. Mwanamvua Boga (Kenya) – Boga is a nurse manager working with the Kenya Medical Research Institute – Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi on the Kenyan coast. She works in a high dependency pediatric unit at the Kilifi County Hospital that provides clinical care in parallel to conducting medical research in tropical diseases. The unit admits children with a range of conditions including extremely premature babies, children with meningitis, severe malaria, sepsis, cancers and more. Mercy Owuor (Kenya) - Owuor is a Community Programs Director at Lwala Community Alliance where she provides leadership for community programs including efforts to improve maternal and child health, adolescent sexual and reproductive health and HIV care, treatment and stigma reduction. She also works to build the independence of young adolescent girls through mentorship and economic empowerment. Rohani Dg Te’ne (Indonesia) – Te’ne has worked in health for more than 20 years and is now a volunteer community health motivator for Tamaona community health centre. The rural area where Te’ne lives is not accessible by vehicle so she escorts local villagers needing healthcare and especially pregnant women, to the community health centre through difficult terrain which can take over an hour by foot. Margaret Gyapong (Ghana) – Gyapong is currently a Medical Anthropologist at the University of Health and Allied Science in Ghana. Until March 2017, she was the Deputy Director for Research and Development in the Ghana Health Service. Gyapong has also helped turn the Dodowa Health Research Centre into an institution of international repute. Emmah Kariuki (Kenya) – As a Service Delivery Officer with Jhpiego in Kenya, Kariuki works to bring low cost health innovations to disadvantaged communities. This entails providing technical support for service delivery in family planning reproductive health. Kariuki also provides training to healthcare providers, develops training materials, coordinates research activities and supports the Ministry of Health in the implementation of family planning and reproductive activities. Kwanele Asante (South Africa) – Patient activist, lawyer and bioethicist, Asante serves as Chair of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Cancer and has founded and led an effort to end disparities in global cancer. Asante works to ensure that the voice of patients facing barriers to care is elevated to give them a greater chance at prolonging their life. Dr. Aula Abbara (Greece) – Dr. Abbara is the project lead in Greece for the Syrian American Medical Society Global Response, which provides primary healthcare to refugees together with the Greek authorities and International Non-Governmental Organisations. The range of services provided includes: pediatric and maternal health and delivering a Teaching Recovery Techniques program with the Children and War Foundation. Dr. Abbara also teaches healthcare workers in Turkey on topics related to infectious disease. Samalie Kitooleko (Uganda) – Kitooleko is a nurse in charge of the Uganda Rheumatic Heart Disease Registry. She takes care of patients with chronic cardiovascular illnesses such as congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). She realized an increasing number of RHD patients, especially young women, lacked knowledge about their illness and were dying due to preventable complications which inspired her to champion for patient education. Louise Nilunger Mannheimer (Sweden) – Mannheimer is Head of Unit at the Health and Sexuality Unit at the Public Health Agency of Sweden where she is currently leading a team responsible for the national coordination of sexual and reproductive health and rights. Her work also includes HIV prevention of young adults, LGBT rights and tackling male violence against women. With these awards, Women in Global Health, GE Healthcare and our partners aim to celebrate the contributions of women leaders in global health, whose work is championing better health in their communities. We worked closely with our partner organisations to identify women who have made an impact in categories listed above. This list is by no means comprehensive and we are aware that there are many more women out there making great achievements and advances to improve global healthcare at all ends of the spectrum. The focus of this honor is telling the stories of those women who are making an impact at the local, grassroots level and in traditionally under-represented communities. Recognizing the need for these untold stories to reach beyond Geneva, GE Healthcare will be previewing a new documentary that follows three of these women from sunrise to sunset to answer one question: how have these individuals made an impact on the disparity that exists in global health in a way much of the world is still striving to do? Premiering in June, Heroines of Health takes us from South Sulawesi, Indonesia, where Mrs. Rohani wakes up at 4 a.m. for her morning prayer so she can walk pregnant mothers to the nearest health center; to Lwala, Kenya, where Mercy Owuor educates her community about health issues; to Chennai, India, where Dr.. Sharmila Anand is enabling young women to gain employment through a radiology training program. Three women. Three countries. Three stories untold. Until now. Watch the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iy6YJHcPr8I. GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services to meet the demand for increased access, enhanced quality and more affordable healthcare around the world. GE (NYSE: GE) works on things that matter - great people and technologies taking on tough challenges. From medical imaging, software & IT, patient monitoring and diagnostics to drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies and performance improvement solutions, GE Healthcare helps medical professionals deliver great healthcare to their patients. For more information about GE Healthcare, visit our website at www.gehealthcare.com. Women in Global Health (WGH) is a global movement that brings together all genders and backgrounds to achieve gender equality in global health leadership. We believe that everyone has the right to attain equal levels of participation in leadership and decision-making regardless of gender. WGH creates a platform for discussions and collaborative space for leadership, facilitates specific education and training, garners support and commitment from the global community, and demands change for Gender Transformative Leadership. WGH is a virtually based network, registered in California, USA. 1 WHO, Spotlight on statistics: A fact file on health workforce statistics. Gender and health workforce statistics, Issue 2, February 2008. Available online at: http://www.who.int/hrh/statistics/spotlight_2.pdf 4 United Nations: We can end poverty: Millenium development goals and beyond 2015. http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/bkgd.shtml.


Madrid, Spain, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- An ambitious effort has been launched to prevent malaria in pregnancy in communities in sub-Saharan Africa. This innovative initiative will complement existing antenatal care services and increase pregnant women’s opportunities to access care under a grant agreement signed today by Unitaid and Jhpiego, an international nonprofit health organization and affiliate of the Johns Hopkins University. Unitaid is investing US $50 million to ensure that pregnant women in malaria-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa have access to a preventive therapy for malaria known as “intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy” or IPTp. The five-year project, to be implemented by Jhpiego, will increase IPTp coverage and expand antenatal care attendance in four African countries—the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Mozambique and Nigeria. The project–-also known as “Transforming IPT for Optimal Pregnancy” (TIPTOP) – will increase IPTp coverage through community-level distribution of quality-assured sulfadoxine-pyramithimine (the medicine used for IPT). Jhpiego has partnered with the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), which will lead the research and evaluation components of the project. The two organizations will also collaborate with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Medicines for Malaria Venture to achieve the desired results. This community-based IPTp approach, which will augment and complement existing antenatal care services by reaching 400,000 pregnant women and their babies, will also produce the evidence needed to update WHO’s policy on IPTp. In areas with high malaria transmission, pregnant women and young children are especially vulnerable to malaria infection and death. Although malaria is preventable and treatable, an estimated 429,000 people died from the disease in 2015, according to WHO. Moreover, malaria during pregnancy can lead to a number of negative consequences, including low birth-weight for babies and even still births. In some cases, malaria can be fatal for the mother. In 2015, IPTp coverage rates remained at just 31 percent in 20 African countries. The Unitaid-funded TIPTOP project plans to engage community health workers to increase IPTp delivery and demand to ensure there are no missed opportunities for pregnant women to receive this life-saving medicine either in the community or through the antenatal services. “By accelerating access to this critical, life-saving preventive therapy, we are hoping to avert further unnecessary deaths from malaria,” said Lelio Marmora, Unitaid’s Executive Director. “Unitaid continues to advance on all fronts by developing innovative tools to fight malaria and insecticide resistance.” Dr. Leslie Mancuso, Jhpiego’s CEO and President, said the TIPTOP project offers an exciting opportunity to demonstrate an innovative approach to address pregnant women’s needs and stop malaria in pregnancy. “Preventing malaria in pregnancy and reducing malaria-related deaths is achievable—and this partnership will go a long way toward reaching those goals,” she said. Jhpiego, an international nonprofit health organization affiliated with the Johns Hopkins University, has worked for 45 years to empower frontline health workers by designing and implementing effective, low-cost, hands-on solutions to strengthen the delivery of health care services for women and their families. The Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), the result of an innovative alliance between the “la Caixa” Foundation, academic institutions and government bodies, was set up to contribute to the work undertaken by the international community to address the challenges of health in a globalized world. Unitaid is an international organization that invests in new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, tuberculosis and malaria more quickly, more cheaply and more effectively. It accelerates access to innovation so critical health products reach people who most need them. Unitaid’s work allows large-scale introduction of health products through funding by the Global Fund, the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and governments. For more information go to www.jhpiego.org or contact Kristin Vibbert at 1-484-888-0277. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9ee55620-f33b-42bf-a8a6-4995043cd5e4 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/14f4cb31-7953-4c07-a55c-fc9db067db74 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/e0fe1c2c-a804-47fb-847e-e4cfed98181e


Madrid, Spain, May 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- An ambitious effort has been launched to prevent malaria in pregnancy in communities in sub-Saharan Africa. This innovative initiative will complement existing antenatal care services and increase pregnant women’s opportunities to access care under a grant agreement signed today by Unitaid and Jhpiego, an international nonprofit health organization and affiliate of the Johns Hopkins University. Unitaid is investing US $50 million to ensure that pregnant women in malaria-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa have access to a preventive therapy for malaria known as “intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy” or IPTp. The five-year project, to be implemented by Jhpiego, will increase IPTp coverage and expand antenatal care attendance in four African countries—the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Mozambique and Nigeria. The project–-also known as “Transforming IPT for Optimal Pregnancy” (TIPTOP) – will increase IPTp coverage through community-level distribution of quality-assured sulfadoxine-pyramithimine (the medicine used for IPT). Jhpiego has partnered with the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), which will lead the research and evaluation components of the project. The two organizations will also collaborate with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Medicines for Malaria Venture to achieve the desired results. This community-based IPTp approach, which will augment and complement existing antenatal care services by reaching 400,000 pregnant women and their babies, will also produce the evidence needed to update WHO’s policy on IPTp. In areas with high malaria transmission, pregnant women and young children are especially vulnerable to malaria infection and death. Although malaria is preventable and treatable, an estimated 429,000 people died from the disease in 2015, according to WHO. Moreover, malaria during pregnancy can lead to a number of negative consequences, including low birth-weight for babies and even still births. In some cases, malaria can be fatal for the mother. In 2015, IPTp coverage rates remained at just 31 percent in 20 African countries. The Unitaid-funded TIPTOP project plans to engage community health workers to increase IPTp delivery and demand to ensure there are no missed opportunities for pregnant women to receive this life-saving medicine either in the community or through the antenatal services. “By accelerating access to this critical, life-saving preventive therapy, we are hoping to avert further unnecessary deaths from malaria,” said Lelio Marmora, Unitaid’s Executive Director. “Unitaid continues to advance on all fronts by developing innovative tools to fight malaria and insecticide resistance.” Dr. Leslie Mancuso, Jhpiego’s CEO and President, said the TIPTOP project offers an exciting opportunity to demonstrate an innovative approach to address pregnant women’s needs and stop malaria in pregnancy. “Preventing malaria in pregnancy and reducing malaria-related deaths is achievable—and this partnership will go a long way toward reaching those goals,” she said. Jhpiego, an international nonprofit health organization affiliated with the Johns Hopkins University, has worked for 45 years to empower frontline health workers by designing and implementing effective, low-cost, hands-on solutions to strengthen the delivery of health care services for women and their families. The Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), the result of an innovative alliance between the “la Caixa” Foundation, academic institutions and government bodies, was set up to contribute to the work undertaken by the international community to address the challenges of health in a globalized world. Unitaid is an international organization that invests in new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, tuberculosis and malaria more quickly, more cheaply and more effectively. It accelerates access to innovation so critical health products reach people who most need them. Unitaid’s work allows large-scale introduction of health products through funding by the Global Fund, the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and governments. For more information go to www.jhpiego.org or contact Kristin Vibbert at 1-484-888-0277. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/9ee55620-f33b-42bf-a8a6-4995043cd5e4 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/14f4cb31-7953-4c07-a55c-fc9db067db74 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/e0fe1c2c-a804-47fb-847e-e4cfed98181e


Smith J.M.,Jhpiego | Lowe R.F.,Venture Strategies Innovations | Fullerton J.,University of California at San Diego | Currie S.M.,Jhpiego | Harris L.,University of California at Berkeley
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth | Year: 2013

Background: Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is one of the most common causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in low and middle income countries. Magnesium sulfate is the drug of choice for prevention of seizures as part of comprehensive management of the disease. Despite the compelling evidence for the effectiveness of magnesium sulfate, concern has been expressed about its safety and potential for toxicity, particularly among providers in low- and middle-income countries. The purpose of this review was to determine whether the literature published in these global settings supports the concerns about the safety of use of magnesium sulfate.Methods: An integrative review of the literature was conducted to document the known incidences of severe adverse reactions to magnesium sulphate, and specific outcomes of interest related to its use. All types of prospective clinical studies were included if magnesium sulfate was used to manage pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, the study was conducted in a low- or middle-income country, and the study included the recording of the incidence of any adverse side effect resulting from magnesium sulfate use.Results: A total of 24 studies that compared a magnesium sulfate regimen against other drug regimens and examined side effects among 34 subject groups were included. The overall rate of absent patellar reflex among all 9556 aggregated women was 1.6%, with a range of 0-57%. The overall rate of respiratory depression in 25 subject groups in which this outcome was reported was 1.3%, with a range of 0-8.2%. Delay in repeat administration of magnesium sulfate occurred in 3.6% of cases, with a range of 0-65%. Calcium gluconate was administered at an overall rate of less than 0.2%. There was only one maternal death that was attributed by the study authors to the use of magnesium sulfate among the 9556 women in the 24 studies.Conclusion: Concerns about safety and toxicity from the use of magnesium sulfate should be mitigated by findings from this integrative review, which indicates a low incidence of the most severe side effects, documented in studies that used a wide variety of standard and modified drug regimens. Adverse effects of concern to providers occur infrequently, and when they occurred, a delay of repeat administration was generally sufficient to mitigate the effect. Early screening and diagnosis of the disease, appropriate treatment with proven drugs, and reasonable vigilance for women under treatment should be adopted as global policy and practice. © 2013 Smith et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Ejembi C.L.,Ahmadu Bello University | Norick P.,Venture Strategies Innovations | Starrs A.,Family Care International | Thapa K.,Jhpiego
International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics | Year: 2013

New global guidance has emerged to support countries as they consider introducing or scaling-up misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). The World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) recognize the critical role that community and lay health workers play in preventing PPH and increasing access to misoprostol where skilled birth attendants are not available. As case examples from Nigeria and Nepal illustrate, community engagement and empowerment are critical strategies in successful misoprostol for PPH programs, and must increasingly be viewed as part of efforts to improve maternal health and achieve Millennium Development Goal 5. © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.


Smith J.M.,Jhpiego | Gubin R.,Jhpiego | Holston M.M.,Venture Strategies Innovations | Fullerton J.,University of California at San Diego | Prata N.,University of California at Berkeley
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth | Year: 2013

Background: Hemorrhage continues to be a leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. The 2012 World Health Organization guidelines for the prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) recommend oral administration of misoprostol by community health workers (CHWs). However, there are several outstanding questions about distribution of misoprostol for PPH prevention at home births.Methods: We conducted an integrative review of published research studies and evaluation reports from programs that distributed misoprostol at the community level for prevention of PPH at home births. We reviewed methods and cadres involved in education of end-users, drug administration, distribution, and coverage, correct and incorrect usage, and serious adverse events.Results: Eighteen programs were identified; only seven reported all data of interest. Programs utilized a range of strategies and timings for distributing misoprostol. Distribution rates were higher when misoprostol was distributed at a home visit during late pregnancy (54.5-96.9%) or at birth (22.5-83.6%), compared to antenatal care (ANC) distribution at any ANC visit (22.5-49.1%) or late ANC visit (21.0-26.7%). Coverage rates were highest when CHWs and traditional birth attendants distributed misoprostol and lower when health workers/ANC providers distributed the medication. The highest distribution and coverage rates were achieved by programs that allowed self-administration. Seven women took misoprostol prior to delivery out of more than 12,000 women who were followed-up. Facility birth rates increased in the three programs for which this information was available. Fifty-one (51) maternal deaths were reported among 86,732 women taking misoprostol: 24 were attributed to perceived PPH; none were directly attributed to use of misoprostol. Even if all deaths were attributable to PPH, the equivalent ratio (59 maternal deaths/100,000 live births) is substantially lower than the reported maternal mortality ratio in any of these countries.Conclusions: Community-based programs for prevention of PPH at home birth using misoprostol can achieve high distribution and use of the medication, using diverse program strategies. Coverage was greatest when misoprostol was distributed by community health agents at home visits. Programs appear to be safe, with an extremely low rate of ante- or intrapartum administration of the medication. © 2013 Smith et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Smith J.M.,Jhpiego | De Graft-Johnson J.,Save the Children MCHIP | Zyaee P.,International Confederation of Midwives | Ricca J.,Jhpiego | Fullerton J.,Independent Consultant
International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics | Year: 2015

Building upon the World Health Organization's ExpandNet framework, 12 key principles of scale-up have emerged from the implementation of maternal and newborn health interventions. These principles are illustrated by three case studies of scale up of high-impact interventions: the Helping Babies Breathe initiative; pre-service midwifery education in Afghanistan; and advanced distribution of misoprostol for self-administration at home births to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Program planners who seek to scale a maternal and/or newborn health intervention must ensure that: the necessary evidence and mechanisms for local ownership for the intervention are well-established; the intervention is as simple and cost-effective as possible; and the implementers and beneficiaries of the intervention are working in tandem to build institutional capacity at all levels and in consideration of all perspectives. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.


Newman C.J.,Hill International | Fogarty L.,Jhpiego | Makoae L.N.,National University of Lesotho | Reavely E.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
International Journal for Equity in Health | Year: 2011

Background: Gender segregation of occupations, which typically assigns caring/nurturing jobs to women and technical/managerial jobs to men, has been recognized as a major source of inequality worldwide with implications for the development of robust health workforces. In sub-Saharan Africa, gender inequalities are particularly acute in HIV/AIDS caregiving (90% of which is provided in the home), where women and girls make up the informal (and mostly unpaid) workforce. Men's and boy's entry into HIV/AIDS caregiving in greater numbers would both increase the equity and sustainability of national and community-level HIV/AIDS caregiving and mitigate health workforce shortages, but notions of gender essentialism and male primacy make this far from inevitable. In 2008 the Capacity Project partnered with the Lesotho Ministry of Health and Social Welfare in a study of the gender dynamics of HIV/AIDS caregiving in three districts of Lesotho to account for men's absence in HIV/AIDS caregiving and investigate ways in which they might be recruited into the community and home-based care (CHBC) workforce. Methods. The study used qualitative methods, including 25 key informant interviews with village chiefs, nurse clinicians, and hospital administrators and 31 focus group discussions with community health workers, community members, ex-miners, and HIV-positive men and women. Results: Study participants uniformly perceived a need to increase the number of CHBC providers to deal with the heavy workload from increasing numbers of patients and insufficient new entries. HIV/AIDS caregiving is a gender-segregated job, at the core of which lie stereotypes and beliefs about the appropriate work of men and women. This results in an inequitable, unsustainable burden on women and girls. Strategies are analyzed for their potential effectiveness in increasing equity in caregiving. Conclusions: HIV/AIDS and human resources stakeholders must address occupational segregation and the underlying gender essentialism and male primacy if there is to be more equitable sharing of the HIV/AIDS caregiving burden and any long-term solution to health worker shortages. Policymakers, activists and programmers must redress the persistent disadvantages faced by the mostly female caregiving workforce and the gendered economic, psychological, and social impacts entailed in HIV/AIDS caregiving. Research on gender desegregation of HIV/AIDS caregiving is needed. © 2011 Newman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Stender S.C.,Jhpiego
The international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease | Year: 2013

The ultimate goal of government health systems is to provide highly effective equitable services that save lives and reduce morbidity and mortality. The pressure to conform to duplicative global and donor initiatives compounds existing challenges to health systems strengthening such as shortages of human resources for health, weak supply chains, inadequate laboratory services and parallel data management systems. This article illustrates how primary health care, as the point of entry into the health care system for the majority of individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, should be strengthened to ensure that individuals and their communities receive essential, holistic care.


During the last two decades, the use of maternal health services has increased dramatically in Pakistan, with nearly 80% of Pakistani women making an antenatal care (ANC) visit during their pregnancy. Yet, this increase in use of modern health services has not translated into significant increases in the adoption of contraception. Even though Pakistan has had a national family planning programme and policies since the 1950s, contraceptive use has increased slowly to reach only 35% in 2012-13. No evidence is currently available to demonstrate whether the utilization of maternal health services is associated with contraceptive adoption in Pakistan. This study uses data from a large-scale survey conducted in Sindh province in 2013 to examine whether ANC utilization is a significant predictor of subsequent contraceptive use among women. In an analysis which controls for a range of variables known to be important for family planning adoption, the findings show that ANC is the strongest predictor of subsequent family planning use among women in Sindh. The antenatal visit represents an enormous opportunity to promote the adoption of family planning in Pakistan. The family planning programme should ensure that high-quality family planning counselling is provided to women during their ANC visits. This approach has the potential for contributing to substantial increases in contraceptive use in Pakistan. © The Author 2015.

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