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Jeonju, South Korea

Jeon S.-N.,Ministry of National Defense | Shin H.,Jeonju Kijeon College | Lee H.-J.,Yonsei University
Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives | Year: 2012

Objectives: This study examined components in Rowe and Kahn's successful aging model to investigate their hierarchical order and led to a modification of the previous hierarchical order. Methods: To examine the hierarchical order of components, we constructed a structural equation model and verified those paths that have discrepancies in studies and/or potential inclusion or omission errors in the model. For this purpose, we analyzed 556 cases out of stratified and purposively sampled 600 elderly people living in the city of Jeonju during the study period (2011). Results: The paths with inclusion errors such as H3 [self-reported health → productive activity (SRH → PA)]: the effect of SRH on PA, and H6 [social network (SN) → PA]: the effect of SN on PA, were not directly but indirectly supported. The path with discrepancy, H4 [SN → physical-cognitive function (PCF)]: the effect of SN on PCFs, was statistically significant. The path with inclusion error and discrepancy, H8 (PCF → PA): the effect of PCF on PA, was not directly but indirectly supported. Also the path with the omission error, H2 [SRH → psychological trait (PT)]: the effect of SRH on PT, was statistically significant. The other paths in the hierarchical order of the model reported in previous studies were statistically significant. Conclusion: We verified new dynamics of constructs involved in successful aging, which would provide better understanding of Rowe and Kahn's successful aging model for Korean elderly people living in a medium-sized city. © 2012. Source


Kim S.,Chungnam National University | Sung J.Y.,Far East University of South Korea | Cho H.H.,Jeonju Kijeon College | Kwon K.C.,Chungnam National University | Koo S.H.,Chungnam National University
Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

This study aimed to characterize CTX-M producers of urinary E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates and to determine the prevalence of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes among them. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined, and PCR and sequencing were performed. Among the 42 (82.3%) E. coli and 24 (77.4%) K. pneumoniae isolates containing blaCTX-M, blaCTX-M-14 and blaCTX-M-15 were detected in 23 and 19 E. coli isolates, respectively, and in 7 and 17 K. pneumoniae isolates, respectively. CTX-M producers of urinary E. coli and K. pneumoniae were resistant to multiple antibiotics and contained other antimicrobial resistance genes. CTX-M-15 producers contained more antimicrobial resistance genes than did CTX-M-14 producers. © 2014 by The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology. Source


Cho H.H.,Chungnam National University | Cho H.H.,Jeonju Kijeon College | Kwon K.C.,Chungnam National University | Sung J.Y.,Far East University of South Korea | Koo S.H.,Chungnam National University
Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science | Year: 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the primary opportunistic pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections. Recently, sequence type 235 (ST235) has been found internationally in a multidrug-resistant clone and is involved in the dissemination of genes encoding IMP-6 and VIM-2. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of metallo-ß-lactamase (MBL), epidemiological relationship, and genetic characterization to aminoglycoside resistance in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from a tertiary hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from 2008 to 2012. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of six antimicrobial agents were determined using the agar dilution method. PCR and DNA sequencing were used to identify MBL genes, class 1 integrons, and genes contributing to the aminoglycoside resistance phenotype. In addition, an epidemiological relationship was investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Eleven (16.2%) carbapenem-resistant isolates were MBL-producers; the major MBL type was IMP-6 (10 isolates). IMP-6-producing isolates were multidrug-resistant and belonged to ST235. All IMP- 6-producing isolates had class 1 integrons (5.5 Kb; blaIMP-6-qac-aacA4-blaOXA-1-addA1). We identified genetic characteristics in aminoglycoside genes between ST235 and non-ST235. All ST235 isolates contained aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes, whereas 23.5% of non-ST235 isolates contained AME genes. Development and spread of the aminoglycoside resistance gene in P. aeruginosa non-ST235 could result in multidrug resistance in the future. © 2013 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc. Source


Sung J.Y.,Far East University of South Korea | Koo S.H.,Chungnam National University | Cho H.H.,Jeonju Kijeon College | Kwon K.C.,Chungnam National University
Annals of Laboratory Medicine | Year: 2012

Background: Acinetobacter baumannii resistance islands (AbaRs) have been recently recognized as mobile genetic elements that harbor multiple resistance determinants and are associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). In the present study, we aimed to determine the AbaRs conferring multiple antimicrobial resistance and their clonal relatedness to MDR A. baumannii clinical isolates obtained from a university hospital in Daejeon, Korea. Methods: This study included 29 MDR A. baumannii strains isolated in Daejeon, Korea. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. A. baumannii isolates were characterized using the 2 multiplex PCR assays and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. To detect and characterize AbaRs, PCR and PCR mapping experiments were performed. Results: Twenty-seven of the 29 isolates belonged to the European (EU) clone II lineage and contained 5 sequence types (STs) (75, 92, 137, 138, and 357). In this study, ST357 was confrmed for the frst time in Korea. Only 2 of the 29 isolates belonged to the EU clone I lineage, and were confrmed as ST109. These 2 isolates harbored the 22-kb AbaR7 aacC1-orfP-orfQ-aadA1 gene cassette array. In contrast, AbaR was not found in EU clone II isolates. Conclusions: This is the first study that attempted to determine the AbaRs in MDR A. baumannii isolates in Korea. We found 2 EU clone I isolates (ST109) that harbored AbaR7. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine. Source


Cho H.H.,Jeonju Kijeon College | Kwon K.C.,Chungnam National University | Kim S.,Chungnam National University | Koo S.H.,Chungnam National University
Annals of Laboratory Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a clinically important pathogen that causes opportunistic infections and nosocomial outbreaks. Recently, the type III secretion system (TTSS) has been shown to play an important role in the virulence of P. aeruginosa. ExoU, in particular, has the greatest impact on disease severity. We examined the relationship among the TTSS effector genotype (exoS and exoU), fluoroquinolone resistance, and target site mutations in 66 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Methods: Sixty-six carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were collected from patients in a university hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from January 2008 to May 2012. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) were determined by using the agar dilution method. We used PCR and sequencing to determine the TTSS effector genotype and quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the respective target genes gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. Results: A higher proportion of exoU+ strains were fluoroquinolone-resistant than exoS+ strains (93.2%, 41/44 vs. 45.0%, 9/20; P=0.0001). Additionally, exoU+ strains were more likely to carry combined mutations than exoS+ strains (97.6%, 40/41 vs. 70%, 7/10; P=0.021), and MIC increased as the number of active mutations increased. Conclusions: The recent overuse of fluoroquinolone has led to both increased resistance and enhanced virulence of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. These data indicate a specific relationship among exoU genotype, fluoroquinolone resistance, and resistance-conferring mutations. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine. Source

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