Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute

Jeju, South Korea

Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute

Jeju, South Korea
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An H.S.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Hong S.W.,Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute | Kim E.M.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Lee J.-H.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | And 5 more authors.
Animal Cells and Systems | Year: 2010

Pacific abalone Haliotis discus discus is an important fisheries resource in Jeju, Korea. For basic information about its current genetic status in relation to stock enhancement, the level and distribution of genetic variation between wild and released stocks of Pacific abalone in Jeju were examined at nine cross-species microsatellite markers including the use of two novel primers. High levels of polymorphism were observed between the two populations. A total of 146 different alleles were found at all loci, with some alleles being unique. The allelic variability ranged from five to 27 in the wild population and from four to 16 in the released sample. The average observed and expected heterozygosities were estimated to be 0.74 and 0.84 in the wild sample and 0.70 and 0.78 in the released sample, respectively. Although a considerable loss of rare alleles was observed in the released sample, no statistically significant reductions were found in heterozygosity or allelic diversity in the released sample compared to the wild population. Low but significant genetic differentiation was found between the wild and released populations. These results suggest that the intensive breeding practices for stock enhancement may have resulted in a further decrease in genetic diversity, and that the cross-species microsatellite markers used in this study represent a potentially efficient means for further genetic studies, providing beneficial information for the protection and management of H. discus discus. © 2010 Korean Society for Integrative Biology.


An H.S.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Lee J.W.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Hong S.W.,Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute | Hong H.N.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | And 3 more authors.
Genes and Genomics | Year: 2013

Red sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus is the most important and valuable commercial sea cucumber species in Korea. Its farming and stock enhancement started in the early 2000s and is still rapid expansion in Korea. Therefore, the analyses of genetic status of wild and hatchery populations are necessary to maintain the genetic diversity of this valuable marine resource. In this study, possible genetic similarity and differences between the wild population and hatchery population in Jeju, Korea were accessed using multiplex assays with eight highly polymorphic microsatellite loci. High levels of polymorphism were observed between the two populations. A total of 93 different alleles were found. Although a considerable loss of unique alleles and relatively high inbreeding coefficient value were observed in the hatchery samples, no statistically significant reductions were found in heterozygosity or allelic diversity in the hatchery population, compared with the wild population. However, significant genetic heterogeneity was found between two populations. These results suggest that genetic drift has probably promoted differentiation between populations, and stocking intensity in wild populations may correlate with loss of genetic integrity. Therefore, the sustainable exploitation plans of the fishery resource should be developed by applying basic genetic principles combined with molecular monitoring. This genetic baseline information of Korean red sea cucumber has important implications for designing of genetically sustainable restocking programs and more efficient conservation management guidelines for these valuable genetic materials. © 2013 The Genetics Society of Korea.


An H.S.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Lee J.W.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Hong S.W.,Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute | Myeong J.I.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | An C.M.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute
Biochemical Systematics and Ecology | Year: 2013

The threadsail filefish Stephanolepis cirrhifer is one of the most important commercial fish resources in Korea. However, its natural populations have declined drastically over the last several decades. To investigate the genetic characteristics of the threadsail filefish for conservation and management purposes, its genetic variation was analyzed in Korean fishing grounds using 11 microsatellite loci. All populations showed moderate genetic diversity (mean number of alleles (NA)=8.6, expected heterozygosity (He)=0.73), representing a slightly lower level of genetic variability than other congeneric species. The presence of a weak genetic population substructure was detected (FST=0.023, RST=0.030, P<0.001), but this substructure did not feature significant isolation based on the distance between populations. This differentiation may be primarily attributable to genetic differences between populations from Geomundo and other localities, based on relative low level of gene flow, a high level of pairwise FST and RST or the position of this population in a phylogenetic tree. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) also revealed a greater part of the variation within the population and genetic differentiation among the samples analyzed and identified two genetic clusters. The possibility of a recent genetic bottleneck was observed in some populations of S. cirrhifer. Given the prevailing ocean currents and the intensity of threadsail filefish harvesting activities in Korea, the possibility that human harvest and stock enhancement activities may have partially contributed to our detected genetic pattern cannot be excluded. Management strategies that take these findings into account might lower the risk of harmful genetic change in the species. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


An H.S.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Lee J.W.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Hong S.W.,Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute
Biochemical Systematics and Ecology | Year: 2013

The Pacific abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta, of the family Haliotidae, is one of the most important shellfish species in eastern Asia. In Korea, it is intensively caught in Jeju Island, where it is highly appreciated as seafood. However, its natural population has declined drastically in the past several decades. To investigate its genetic characteristics for conservation and management purposes, the genetic variation in four populations from Jeju Island, Korea was analyzed using 20 microsatellite loci. All populations showed very high genetic diversity and a deficit of heterozygotes. The minor but significant genetic differentiations (both FST and RST) observed were mainly due to genetic differences between populations from Pyoson and other localities, suggesting that abalone may not be panmictic. The Pyoson abalone population showed a significant difference in allelic richness that could be related to harvesting intensity and stock enhancement activity. This result was also corroborated by an analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Overall, this report presents novel observations of the wild genetic population structure in H. diversicolor supertexta from Korea using microsatellite markers and provides critical information for supporting conservation strategies for this species, namely that the Pyoson abalone population should have a higher conservation priority due to its unique genetic characteristics. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


An H.S.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Hong S.W.,Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute | Kim E.M.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Myeong J.I.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute
Genes and Genomics | Year: 2011

The threadsail filefish Stephanolepis cirrhifer is a highly commercial fisheries resource in Korea that suffers intensive anthropogenic pressure across much of its range. For basic information about its current genetic status in relation to stock enhancement, the level and distribution of genetic variation between a wild and a hatchery-bred population were investigated using 10 microsatellite markers developed for Thamnaconus modestus. High levels of polymorphism were observed between the two populations. A total of 95 different alleles were found at all loci, with some alleles being unique. The allelic variability ranged from six to 13 in the wild population and from five to 13 in the hatchery one. The average observed and expected heterozygosities were estimated to be 0.72 and 0.80 in the wild sample and 0.70 and 0.79 in the hatchery one, respectively. These results showed similar genetic variability in the hatchery population, as compared with the wild population and significant genetic differentiation between the wild population and the hatchery samples (FST = 0.016, P < 0.05). Genetic drift in the intensive breeding practices for stock enhancement has probably promoted differentiation between populations. Significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected in both populations. Our results indicate that further studies using species-specific micro-satellite markers will be necessary for a more reliable assessment of genetic diversity of the species. © The Genetics Society of Korea and Springer 2011.


An H.S.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Lee J.W.,South Korean National Fisheries Research and Development Institute | Hong S.W.,Jeju Province Fisheries Research Institute
International Journal of Molecular Sciences | Year: 2012

The small abalone, Haliotis diversicolor supertexta, of the family Haliotidae, is one of the most important species of marine shellfish in eastern Asia. Over the past few decades, this species has drastically declined in Korea. Thus, hatchery-bred seeds have been released into natural coastal areas to compensate for the reduced fishery resources. However, information on the genetic background of the small abalone is scarce. In this study, 20 polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and used to compare allelic variation between wild and released abalone populations in Korea. Using high-throughput genomic sequencing, a total of 1516 (2.26%; average length of 385 bp) reads containing simple sequence repeats were obtained from 86,011 raw reads. Among the 99 loci screened, 28 amplified successfully, and 20 were polymorphic. When comparing allelic variation between wild and released abalone populations, a total of 243 different alleles were observed, with 18.7 alleles per locus. High genetic diversity (mean heterozygosity = 0.81; mean allelic number = 15.5) was observed in both populations. A statistical analysis of the fixation index (FST) and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated limited genetic differences between the two populations (FST = 0.002, p > 0.05). Although no significant reductions in the genetic diversity were found in the released population compared with the wild population (p > 0.05), the genetic diversity parameters revealed that the seeds released for stock abundance had a different genetic composition. These differences are likely a result of hatchery selection and inbreeding. Additionally, all the primer pair sets were effectively amplified in another congeneric species, H. diversicolor diversicolor, indicating that these primers are useful for both abalone species. These microsatellite loci may be valuable for future aquaculture and population genetic studies aimed at developing conservation and management plans for these two abalone species. © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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