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Okahisa Y.,Okayama University of Science | Kodama M.,Okayama University of Science | Takaki M.,Okayama University of Science | Inada T.,JGIDA Japanese Genetics Initiative for Drug Abuse | And 13 more authors.
Current Neuropharmacology | Year: 2011

The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) modulates the functioning of heterotrimeric G protein. RGS9-2 is highly expressed in the striatum and plays a role in modulating dopaminergic receptor-mediated signaling cascades. Previous studies suggested that the RGS9 gene might contribute to the susceptibility to psychotic diseases. Therefore, we investigated the association between the RGS9 gene and two related dopamine psychoses, schizophrenia and methamphetamine use disorders. The subjects comprised 487 patients of schizophrenia and 464 age- and sex-matched healthy controls and 220 patients of methamphetamine use disorder and 289 controls. We genotyped two nonsynonymous polymorphisms, rs12452285 (Leu225Ser) and rs34797451 (His498Arg), of the RGS9 gene. Rs34797451 showed monomorphism in the present Japanese population, but rs12452285 showed polymorphism. There were no significant differences in genotypic or allelic distributions of rs12452285 between patients with schizophrenia and the corresponding control or between patients with methamphetamine use disorder and the corresponding control. We also analyzed the clinical features of methamphetamine use disorder. We found a significant association in allelic distribution with the phenotypes of age at first consumption (p=0.047). The present study suggested that the RGS9 gene is unlikely to play a major role in schizophrenia and methamphetamine dependence liability and/or the development of methamphetamine induced psychosis, at least in a Japanese population. ©2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.


Okahisa Y.,Okayama University of Science | Kodama M.,Okayama University of Science | Takaki M.,Okayama University of Science | Inada T.,JGIDA Japanese Genetics Initiative for Drug Abuse | And 13 more authors.
Current Neuropharmacology | Year: 2011

Several studies have suggested that the endocannabinoid system plays significant roles in the vulnerability to psychiatric disorders including drug abuse. To examine the possible association of the CNR1 and CNR2 genes, which encode cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, with methamphetamine dependence, we investigated three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs806379, rs1535255, rs2023239) in intron 2 of the CNR1 gene and a nonsynonymous SNP, Q63R, in the CNR2 gene. The study samples consisted of 223 patients with methamphetamine dependence and 292 age- and sex- matched controls. There were no significant differences between the patients and controls in genotypic or allelic distribution of any SNP of the CNR1 and CNR2 genes. We also analyzed the clinical features of methamphetamine dependence. Rs806379 of the CNR1 gene showed a significant association with the phenotype of latency of psychosis after the first consumption of methamphetamine. Patients with the T allele or T-positive genotypes (T/T or A/T) may develop a rapid onset of psychosis after methamphetamine abuse. The present study suggests a possibility that genetic variants of the CNR1 gene may produce a liability to the complication of psychotic state after abuse of methamphetamine; however, our findings need to be confirmed by future replications. ©2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.


Yokobayashi E.,Okayama University of Science | Ujike H.,Okayama University of Science | Kotaka T.,Okayama University of Science | Okahisa Y.,Okayama University of Science | And 16 more authors.
Current Neuropharmacology | Year: 2011

Experimental studies have demonstrated that not only dopaminergic signaling but also glutamatergic/NMDA receptor signaling play indispensable roles in the development of methamphetamine psychosis. Our recent genetic studies provided evidence that genetic variants of glutamate-related genes such as DTNBP1, GLYT1, and G72, which are involved in glutamate release and regulation of co-agonists for NMDA receptors, conferred susceptibility to methamphetamine psychosis. Serine racemase converts l-serine to d-serine, which is an endogenous co-agonist for NMDA receptors. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the serine racemase gene (SRR), rs224770, rs3760229, and rs408067, were proven to affect the transcription activity of SRR. Therefore, we examined these SNPs in 225 patients with methamphetamine psychosis and 291 age- and sex-matched controls. There was no significant association between methamphetamine psychosis and any SNP examined or between the disorder and haplotypes comprising the three SNPs. However, rs408067 was significantly associated with the prognosis for methamphetamine psychosis and multi-substance abuse status. The patients with C-positive genotypes (CC or CG) of rs408067 showed better prognosis of sychosis after therapy and less abuse of multiple substances than the patients with GG genotypes. Because the C allele of rs408067 reduces the expression of SRR, a lower d-serine level or reduced NMDA receptor activation may affect the prognosis of methamphetamine psychosis and multiple substance abuse. Our sample size is, however, not large enough to eliminate the possibility of a type I error, our findings must be confirmed by replicate studies with larger samples. ©2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.


Ujike H.,Okayama University of Science | Kishimoto M.,Okayama University of Science | Okahisa Y.,Okayama University of Science | Kodama M.,Okayama University of Science | And 14 more authors.
Current Neuropharmacology | Year: 2011

Several lines of evidence implicate serotonergic dysfunction in diverse psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Mice with a knock-out of the 5HT1b receptor gene (HTR1B) displayed increased locomotor response to cocaine and elevated motivation to self-administer cocaine and alcohol. Previous genetic studies showed significant associations of HTR1B with alcohol dependence and substance abuse, but were followed by inconsistent results. We examined a case-control genetic association study of HTR1B with methamphetamine-dependence patients in a Japanese population. The subjects were 231 patients with methamphetamine dependence, 214 of whom had a comorbidity of methamphetamine psychosis, and 248 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs130058 (A-165T), rs1228814 (A-700C) and rs1228814 (A+1180G) of HTR1B were genotyped. There was no significant difference in allelic and genotypic distributions of the SNPs between methamphetamine dependence and the control. Genetic associations of HTR1B were tested with several clinical phenotypes of methamphetamine dependence and/or psychosis, such as age at first abuse, duration of latency from the first abuse to onset of psychosis, prognosis of psychosis after therapy, and complication of spontaneous relapse of psychotic state. There was, however, no asscocation between any SNP and the clinical phenotypes. Haplotype analyses showed the three SNPs examined were within linkage disequilibrium, which implied that the three SNPs covered the whole HTR1B, and distribution of estimated haplotype frequency was not different between the groups. The present findings may indicate that HTR1B does not play a major role in individual susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence or development of methamphetamine-induced psychosis. ©2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

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