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Nishi-Tokyo-shi, Japan

Xue N.-T.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wang Q.-H.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wu C-F.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Sun X.-H.,Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences | Xie W.-M.,Japan TOHIN Company Group Profile
Journal of Zhejiang University: Science A | Year: 2010

The use of a biotrickling filter was investigated for a pilot field-scale elimination of NH3 gas and other odorous gases from a composting plant in Tongzhou District, Beijing. The inlet gas flow rate was 3500 m 3/h and NH3 concentration fluctuated between 2.76-27.84 mg/m3, while the average outlet concentration was 1.06 mg/m 3 with an average of 94.9% removal. Critical volumetric loading (removal efficiency=100%) was 11.22 g-N/(m3-h). The odor concentration removal was 86.7%. NH3 removal efficiency decreased as the free ammonia (FA) in the trickling liquid increased. The pressure drop was maintained at about 50 Pa/m and was never more than 55 Pa/m. During the experiment, there was neither backflushing required nor any indication of clogging. Overall, the biotrickling filter was highly efficient and cost-effective for the simultaneous biodegradation of NH3 and other odorous gases from composting, suggesting the possibility of treating odorous gases at the industrial level. © Zhejiang University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010. Source


Xue N.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wang Q.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wu C.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Zhang L.,Harbin Institute of Technology | Xie W.,Japan TOHIN Company Group Profile
Biochemical Engineering Journal | Year: 2010

A biotrickling filter (BTF) was used to treat NH3 emitted from the exhaust gases of cattle manure compost. Results of the non-biofilm experiment suggested that NH3 could not be removed effectively only through biofilm adsorption. The absence of NH4 + bio-oxidation resulted in an increase in free ammonia, which had a negative effect on NH3 removal. After biofilm culture, NH3 removal efficiency fluctuated between 67.2% and 94.3% because the presence of a biofilm extended the liquid residence time in the packing. When the biofilm was inoculated with nitrifying bacteria comprised of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which were screened from a cattle manure solution, the average removal efficiencies became 59.9% and 15.0% higher than those of the non-biofilm and biofilm culture experiments, respectively. AOB and NOB could still oxidize ammonia and nitrite, respectively, even when the free nitrous acid concentration was as high as 37.6mg/L. With an empty bed retention time of 96.0s and a removal efficiency of 99%, NH3 elimination capacities were attained at 57.1, 28.6, and 23.7g-N/(m3h) for the first segment, the first and second segment, and the whole BTF, respectively. These results demonstrate that the BTF under study is a viable alternative for the treatment of NH3 during composting. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. Source


Wu C.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wang Q.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Sun X.,Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences | Xue N.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | And 2 more authors.
Waste Management | Year: 2011

A pilot biotrickling filter (BTF) packed with ZX02 fibrous balls as packing material was tested for the treatment of ammonia (NH 3) released from a composting plant of dairy manure. In order to investigate the effects of three compost aeration modes (mode Co-I, Co-II and In-II) on the NH 3 removal efficiency, a field experiment was continuously carried out for more than eight months. The results demonstrated that under the intermittent aeration mode (In-II), the NH 3 removal efficiency reached 99.2±0.1% when the inlet NH 3 concentration was 7.5-32.3mgm -3 (9.8-42.5ppmv). The maximum and critical elimination capacity of the biotrickling filter was 22.6 and 4.9g NH 3m -3h -1, respectively. The effluent concentration of NH 3 was lower than 1.0mgm -3, which meets the first class discharge standards of GB14554-93. When the concentration of free ammonia in the trickling liquid was varied from 0.1 to 0.4mgL -1, the nitrification yield was between 47.9% and 103.8%. In addition, the optimum liquid tricking velocity (LTV) of the biotrickling filter was 0.5m 3m -2h -1 for low inlet concentrations and 2.2m 3m -2h -1 for high inlet concentrations. Therefore, the use of the biotrickling filter for the compost under the third aeration mode (In-II) yielded an effective optimum NH 3 removal and reduced the nitrogen loss in the compost. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Xue N.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wang Q.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Wu C.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Zhao P.,University of Science and Technology Beijing | Xie W.,Japan TOHIN Company Group Profile
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2011

A biotrickling filter was focused on treatment of odorous NH3 gas, along with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other odorous gases during cattle manure composting. The biotrickling filter could treat NH3, the main composition, with removal efficiencies of close to 100% because NH 4 + was bio-oxidized in the biofilm to NO3 - resulting final NO3 - concentrations of about 1000 mg/L. Results of polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) revealed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosospira sp, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrococcus mobilis, coexisted in the biofilm. There were 23 kinds of VOCs detected in the exhaust gas. A significant observation was that the biofilm itself of the biotrickling biofilter released VOCs. The odor concentrations of inlet and outlet gases were 1425 and 110, respectively, with removal efficiency of 92.2%, suggesting that the biotrickling filter was effective for treatment of odorous gases during composting. © IWA Publishing 2011. Source

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