Japan Medical Laser Laboratory

Japan, Japan

Japan Medical Laser Laboratory

Japan, Japan

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PubMed | Toho University and Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Laser therapy | Year: 2014

In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic shoulder joint pain, elbow, hand and finger pain, and low back pain. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic neck pain.Over a 3 year period, 26 rehabilitation department outpatients with chronic neck pain, diagnosed as being caused by cervical disk hernia, underwent treatment applied to the painful area with a 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device delivering at 830 nm in continuous wave, 20.1 J/cm(2)/point, and three shots were given per session (1 treatment) with twice a week for 4 weeks.1. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). 2. After treatment, no significant differences in cervical spine range of motion were observed. 3. Discussions with the patients revealed that in order to receive continued benefits from treatment, it was important for them to be taught how to avoid postures that would cause them neck pain in everyday life.The present study demonstrates that LLLT was an effective form of treatment for neck and back pain caused by cervical disk hernia, reinforced by postural training.


PubMed | Toho University and Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Laser therapy | Year: 2015

Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain.Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks.A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). After treatment, no significant differences were observed in the knee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment.The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.


Shiroto C.,Shiroto Clinic | Ohshiro T.,Keio University | Ohshiro T.,Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Laser Therapy | Year: 2014

The assessment of the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for pain attenuation varies among institutions, all having their own method of assessment with no common standards. At the author’s institution in the beginning, the patients were asked how they assessed their pain relief immediately after the treatment. They were to choose from excellent, good, fair, no change and poor. The overall efficacy rate was calculated by the numbers of patients scoring excellent and good, expressed as a percentage of the total number of patients.However, a large number of institutions have utilized the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) or the Pain Relief Score (PRS) for the assessment of treatment; but even then, the evaluation could not be considered uniform. Therefore, the standardization of the efficacy rate was continuously discussed among the practitioners of LLLT, dating back to the 9thannual meeting of the Japan Laser Therapy Association (JaLTA) in 1997. It took four years (including the 1997 meeting) until finally an agreement was reached and a new standard of efficacy was presented at the 12thJaLTA meeting in 2000, based on the PRS.The new standard defined excellent as pain reduction in any treatment session from 10 to 0 or 1, good as reduction from 10 to 2∼5, fair as reduction from 10 to 6∼8, no change as a reduction from 10 to 9∼10 and poor was defined as exacerbation of pain from 10 to 11 or greater. Efficacy rate was calculated by the number of patients scoring excellent and good expressed as a percentage of the total number of patients. For the purpose of reference, the VAS was to be used for patients receiving the treatment for the first time. © 2014 JMLL, Tokyo, Japan.


Kawano Y.,Oita University | Utsunomiya-Kai Y.,Oita University | Kai K.,Oita University | Miyakawa I.,Oita University | And 2 more authors.
Laser Therapy | Year: 2012

Objective: The function of granulosa cells is regulated by various hormones and growth factors. Our aim is to clarify the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced by low level laser therapy (LLLT) in human granulosa cells. Methods: A human granulosa cell line, KGN cells, were cultured and incubated after LLLT (60mW, GaAlAs 830nm). The levels of VEGF in the culture media were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The activation of MAP kinase in KGN cells was detected by western blot analysis. Results: VEGF production was significantly increased by LLLT in a time-dependent manner. MAP kinase activity was increased by LLLT. In addition it was enhanced by LLLT and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulation. Conclusions: The results suggested that VEGF is induced by LLLT through mechanisms involving MAPK. The increase in VEGF may contribute to neovascularization, which in turn would promote various ovulation phenomena as well as follicular growth. ©2012 JMLL, Tokyo, Japan.


Background: The reader from the conception of the WFSLMS to its inception at the inaugural meeting in Tokyo, 2005 and events up to the 2009 2ndWFSLMS in Tokyo when the author was the congress president. The previous article also dealt with the necessity for founding a non-profit organization, NPO-WFSLMS, to handle the commercial and social responsibilities of the WFSLMS. For details, please refer to that previous article. Meetings: The 2ndWFSLMS congress was successfully held in 2009 in Japan, under the presidency of Professor Krishna Rau. The third WFSLMS meeting was planned for Paris in 2013 together with the 20thISLSM congress under the Meeting Presidency of Dr Jean Abitbol, while the 19thISLSM was to be held in Korea in 2011 under the Meeting Presidency of Prof. Jin-Wang Kim. Unforseen problems beyond the control of the organizers forced the cancellation of both the 19thand 20thmeetings of the ISLSM, the latter also being the location of the planned third WFSLMS congress in Paris, but with the cooperation of the organizers of the 5thcongress of the International Phototherapy Association (IPTA) the 3rd WFSLMS meeting was held in Lithuania, again under the presidency of Prof Rau concurrently with the 20thISLSM, at which much was debated regarding the future course of NPO-WFSLMS and WFSLMS. The venue of the 2015 21st ISLSM Congress was set as Indore, India, and the 4thWFSLMS meeting was allocated to Florence, Italy, in tandem with the 22ndISLSM congress. Projects: In the interim, NPO-WFSLMS effectively managed laser education programs in Japan for developing country doctors, and also handled the donation of laser systems to Vietnam and Thailand, the latter being under the auspices of the Greek Medical Laser Association, together with associated education programs. The laser-based Blood Saving Campaign (BSaC) has been actively promoted in Asian countries up to the present, designed to minimize the need for transfusions and prevent intraoperative blood loss through the hemostatic properties of surgical lasers, bloodless minimally-invasive treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) and noninvasive LLLT. The Future: The WFSLMS will make more active overtures to solidify the inter-society cooperation among as many of the major laser societies as possible, both national and international. There are problems to be faced and overcome, but in a mood of cautious optimism, NPO-WFSLMS will work with WFSLMS and ISLSM towards this very worthwhile goal. © 2015 JMLL, Tokyo, Japan.


PubMed | Oita University and Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Laser therapy | Year: 2014

The function of granulosa cells is regulated by various hormones and growth factors. Our aim is to clarify the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced by low level laser therapy (LLLT) in human granulosa cells.A human granulosa cell line, KGN cells, were cultured and incubated after LLLT (60mW, GaAlAs 830nm). The levels of VEGF in the culture media were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The activation of MAP kinase in KGN cells was detected by western blot analysis.VEGF production was significantly increased by LLLT in a time-dependent manner. MAP kinase activity was increased by LLLT. In addition it was enhanced by LLLT and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulation.The results suggested that VEGF is induced by LLLT through mechanisms involving MAPK. The increase in VEGF may contribute to neovascularization, which in turn would promote various ovulation phenomena as well as follicular growth.


Ohshiro T.,Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Laser Therapy | Year: 2011

Background and Aims: Although the use of the laser in medical applications has increased dramatically during the last three decades, it is significant that during the last few years non-laser light sources have gained prominence in photomedicine and photosurgery, particularly the use of lightemitting diodes (LEDs) and intense pulsed light (IPL). The author therefore believed it was important to devise a new classification of light/tissue interactions, and that the well-accepted acronym LLLT and HLLT should now stand for low level light therapy and for high level light treatment, since the 'L' in 'laser', LED and IPL stands for 'light'. Rationale: The author herein presents a classification, which is based on the level of reaction induced by the light incident on tissue, rather than being based on the system used to deliver the light energy. When the level of tissue reactivity to light of very low incident power and energy densities is well below the cells' damage threshold, so that instead of being damaged the cells are directly activated by the low incident photon density, the changes in the irradiated tissue are pho- toactivative and reversible: the author hereafter refers to this group of reactions as low level light therapy (LLLT). When the level of tissue reactivity to light of very high incident power and energy densities is over the cells' damage threshold, so that the cells are directly destroyed, the changes in the irradiated tissue are photodestructive and irreversible: the author hereafter refers to this group of reactions as high level light treatment (HLLT). For levels of tissue reaction intermediate to HLLT and LLLT, the author suggests the new term, medium level light treatment (MLLT), as described in detail herein. Conclusions: When the new classification system of light treatment (LT) is understood and used, the author feels this offers an accurate and simple method of classifying light/tissue reactions by the therapeutic reaction itself, rather than by the light source, laser, LED, IPL system or other, used to produce the reaction. © 2011 JMLL, Tokyo, Japan.


Ohshiro T.,Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Laser Therapy | Year: 2012

Background and Aims: The 830 nm GaAlAs diode laser has played an extremely active role in low level laser therapy (LLLT) since the early 1980's. Recently, the author modified his original proximal priority laser technique (PPLT), and the current article set out to explain the improved approach and show scientific evidence for its efficacy. Laser Therapy System: The laser therapy system used was based on the GaAlAs diode (OhLase- 3D1, JMLL, Japan), delivering 60 mW in continuous wave at a wavelength of 830 nm in the near infrared with a power density at the tip of the probe head of approximately 1.2 W/cm2. Proximal Priority Laser Technique: Under the author's PPLT concept, the brain is the control center for the body so every other part of the body is distal to the head. The main blood supply to the head is through the carotid arteries, and the deep penetration of the 830 nm beam applied to the side of the neck can involve and photoactivate the external and internal carotids, increasing the blood supply to the brain and creating a systemic parasympathetic system-mediated wholebody effect. The author has added gentle neck-stretching, trunk-stretching and his distal tissue softening approaches concomitant with the irradiation which enhance treatment efficacy. Results: Real-time fine-plate thermography has revealed whole-body warming as a result of the PPLT, with applications including chronic pain attenuation, female infertility and functional training of paraplegic cerebral palsy patients. The warming effect had a latency from hours to days, increasing in intensity and latency with subsequent PPLT sessions. Both Doppler flowmetry and SPECT have shown increased cerebral and systemic blood flow following PPLT. Conclusions: PPLT is easy to deliver and offers tangible results in a large range of conditions, enhancing the efficacy of diode laser LLLT. ©2012 JMLL, Tokyo, Japan.


PubMed | Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Laser therapy | Year: 2014

The 830 nm GaAlAs diode laser has played an extremely active role in low level laser therapy (LLLT) since the early 1980s. Recently, the author modified his original proximal priority laser technique (PPLT), and the current article set out to explain the improved approach and show scientific evidence for its efficacy. Laser Therapy System: The laser therapy system used was based on the GaAlAs diode (OhLase-3D1, JMLL, Japan), delivering 60 mW in continuous wave at a wavelength of 830 nm in the near infrared with a power density at the tip of the probe head of approximately 1.2 W/cm(2). Proximal Priority Laser Technique: Under the authors PPLT concept, the brain is the control center for the body so every other part of the body is distal to the head. The main blood supply to the head is through the carotid arteries, and the deep penetration of the 830 nm beam applied to the side of the neck can involve and photoactivate the external and internal carotids, increasing the blood supply to the brain and creating a systemic parasympathetic system-mediated whole-body effect. The author has added gentle neck-stretching, trunk-stretching and his distal tissue softening approaches concomitant with the irradiation which enhance treatment efficacy.Real-time fine-plate thermography has revealed whole-body warming as a result of the PPLT, with applications including chronic pain attenuation, female infertility and functional training of paraplegic cerebral palsy patients. The warming effect had a latency from hours to days, increasing in intensity and latency with subsequent PPLT sessions. Both Doppler flowmetry and SPECT have shown increased cerebral and systemic blood flow following PPLT.PPLT is easy to deliver and offers tangible results in a large range of conditions, enhancing the efficacy of diode laser LLLT.


PubMed | Shiroto Clinic. and Japan Medical Laser Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Laser therapy | Year: 2014

The assessment of the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for pain attenuation varies among institutions, all having their own method of assessment with no common standards. At the authors institution in the beginning, the patients were asked how they assessed their pain relief immediately after the treatment. They were to choose from excellent, good, fair, no change and poor. The overall efficacy rate was calculated by the numbers of patients scoring excellent and good, expressed as a percentage of the total number of patients. However, a large number of institutions have utilized the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) or the Pain Relief Score (PRS) for the assessment of treatment; but even then, the evaluation could not be considered uniform. Therefore, the standardization of the efficacy rate was continuously discussed among the practitioners of LLLT, dating back to the 9(th) annual meeting of the Japan Laser Therapy Association (JaLTA) in 1997. It took four years (including the 1997 meeting) until finally an agreement was reached and a new standard of efficacy was presented at the 12(th) JaLTA meeting in 2000, based on the PRS. The new standard defined excellent as pain reduction in any treatment session from 10 to 0 or 1, good as reduction from 10 to 25, fair as reduction from 10 to 68, no change as a reduction from 10 to 910 and poor was defined as exacerbation of pain from 10 to 11 or greater. Efficacy rate was calculated by the number of patients scoring excellent and good expressed as a percentage of the total number of patients. For the purpose of reference, the VAS was to be used for patients receiving the treatment for the first time.

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