Japan Community Health Care Organization

Tokyo, Japan

Japan Community Health Care Organization

Tokyo, Japan

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Kogashiwa Y.,International University of Japan | Yasuda M.,International University of Japan | Nakahira M.,International University of Japan | Sano Y.,International University of Japan | And 11 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2017

Background/Aim: Clinical trials with therapies targeting immune checkpoint molecules have shown promising results in several tumor types. However, the predictive and prognostic values of these immunological factors for locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas (LAOSCC) remain unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the expression and prognostic value of programmed cell deathligand1 (PD-L1) and PD-L2 and to correlate their expression with the degree of infiltration by CD8+ cells in LAOSCC. Patients and Methods: A total of 84 patients with LAOSCC were included. PD-L1, PD-L2 and CD8 expression was detected in the tumor tissue using immunohistochemistry and was tested for correlation with clinical outcome. Results: PDL1 and PD-L2 were expressed in 52.4% and 23.8% of LAOSCC cases, respectively. PD-L1 positivity was significantly associated with superior disease-free (p=0.024) and overall (p=0.008) survival of the patients and retained significance in multivariate analysis. PD-L1 positivity was correlated with CD8 density. Conclusion: PD-L1 expression was associated with CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and better outcome in patients with LAOSCC.


Sazuka T.,Chiba University | Goto Y.,Chiba University | Kawamura K.,Chiba University | Imamoto T.,Chiba University | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Urology | Year: 2016

Objectives: To validate the ability of contemporary active surveillance protocols to predict pathologically insignificant prostate cancer among Asian men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 132 patients eligible for any active surveillance criteria out of 450 patients that underwent radical prostatectomy at several institutions between 2006 and 2013. We validated the ability of seven contemporary active surveillance protocols to predict pathologically insignificant prostate cancer. Traditional and updated criteria to define pathologically insignificant prostate cancer were used. Predictive factors for pathologically insignificant prostate cancer were determined by logistic regression analysis. Results: The predictive rate for updated pathologically insignificant prostate cancer of respective active surveillance criteria was 51% for Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, 41% for Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance Study, 39% for University of Miami, 32% for University of California, San Francisco, 32% for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 31% for Kakehi and 27% for University of Toronto. Predictive rates for pathologically insignificant prostate cancer in Asian men were far lower than in USA men. On multivariate analysis, predictive factors of updated pathologically insignificant cancer was prostate volume (odds ratio 1.07, P = 0.004). By adding prostate volume to Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance Study criteria, the predictive rate for updated insignificant prostate cancer was improved up to 66.7%. Conclusions: Active surveillance can be carried out considering the clinical characteristics of prostate cancers depending on ethnicity, as current active surveillance criteria seem to have a lower predictive ability value of insignificant prostate cancer in Asian men compared with men in Western countries. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.


PubMed | Toho University, Chiba University and Japan Community Health Care Organization
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association | Year: 2016

To validate the ability of contemporary active surveillance protocols to predict pathologically insignificant prostate cancer among Asian men undergoing radical prostatectomy.We retrospectively reviewed data on 132 patients eligible for any active surveillance criteria out of 450 patients that underwent radical prostatectomy at several institutions between 2006 and 2013. We validated the ability of seven contemporary active surveillance protocols to predict pathologically insignificant prostate cancer. Traditional and updated criteria to define pathologically insignificant prostate cancer were used. Predictive factors for pathologically insignificant prostate cancer were determined by logistic regression analysis.The predictive rate for updated pathologically insignificant prostate cancer of respective active surveillance criteria was 51% for Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, 41% for Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance Study, 39% for University of Miami, 32% for University of California, San Francisco, 32% for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 31% for Kakehi and 27% for University of Toronto. Predictive rates for pathologically insignificant prostate cancer in Asian men were far lower than in USA men. On multivariate analysis, predictive factors of updated pathologically insignificant cancer was prostate volume (odds ratio 1.07, P = 0.004). By adding prostate volume to Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance Study criteria, the predictive rate for updated insignificant prostate cancer was improved up to 66.7%.Active surveillance can be carried out considering the clinical characteristics of prostate cancers depending on ethnicity, as current active surveillance criteria seem to have a lower predictive ability value of insignificant prostate cancer in Asian men compared with men in Western countries.

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