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Taly N.,Cal State University | Kliger H.,H.S. Kliger and Associates | Stawski S.,Janicki Industries
SAMPE Journal | Year: 2010

The SAMPE 2010 Conference and Exhibition hosted the 13 Annual Super Light-weight Bridge competition and the 7th Annual Light Weight Wing competition, held May 17-20 at the Washington State Convention Center, Seattle. There were about 75 students attending the exhibition in Seattle. United Testing of Huntington Beach, CA, provide the test machine, and SAMPE provided a large display/test area near the entrance to the exhibition. The four bridge contest categories were the same as last year. Past experience had shown that some schools were getting very good at designing to be open sections. The wings were particularly exciting again in 2014. They were 36 inches wide with winglets that had to support a torque load in addition to the center Span load. Source


Arey B.W.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Park J.J.,Janicki Industries | Mayer G.,University of Washington
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials | Year: 2015

This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby clarifying how such composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic and other mechanical deformation processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of large deformation behavior of such natural rigid composites (that may also include teeth and bones) should be based on the presence of interpenetrating phases. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


McCarville D.A.,Boeing Company | Guzman J.C.,Boeing Company | Sweetin J.L.,Boeing Company | Jackson J.R.,NASA | And 4 more authors.
SAMPE Journal | Year: 2013

As part of the Space Technology Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) Composite Cryotank Technology Development (CCTD) contract, Boeing fabricated a 2 4 m diameter test article as a precursor to a 55 meter cryo tank design, fabrication, and test This component encompasses several challenging design features (a) one piece co cured/co-bonded spherical geometry with integral skirts, (b) out of autoclave curing materials, (c) permeation resistant thin/hybrid ply laminate skins, and (d) thin and thick off angle slit tape (tow) construction The component was built on a 24 piece collapsible composite tool using robotic fiber placement This paper details the tooling and manufacturing flow with an emphasis on process development building block activities Lessons learned are compiled that will be used to help guide the build of a 5 5 m diameter tank during the next phase of the CCTD contract. Source


McCarville D.A.,Boeing Company | Carlos Guzman J.,Boeing Company | Sweetin J.L.,Boeing Company | Jackson J.R.,NASA | And 4 more authors.
International SAMPE Technical Conference | Year: 2013

As part of the Space Technology Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) Composite Cryotank Technology Development (CCTD) contract, Boeing fabricated a 2.4 m diameter test article as a precursor to a 5.5 meter cryotank design, fabrication, and test. This component encompasses several challenging design features: (a) one-piece co-cured/co-bonded spherical geometry with integral skirts, (b) out-of-autoclave curing materials, (c) permeation resistant thin/hybrid ply laminate skins, and (d) thin and thick off-angle slit tape (tow) construction. The component was built on a 24 piece collapsible composite tool using robotic fiber placement. This paper details the tooling and manufacturing flow with an emphasis on process development building block activities. Lessons learned are compiled that will be used to help guide the build of a 5.5 m diameter tank during the next phase of the CCTD contract. Copyright 2013 by Aurora Flight Sciences. Source


Harper S.I.,Janicki Industries | Applewhite G.,Janicki Industries | Brich J.,Janicki Industries | Zavala M.L.,Janicki Industries
CAMX 2015 - Composites and Advanced Materials Expo | Year: 2015

Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness has been identified as a key characteristic for evaluating and comparing the performance of composite tooling material systems. Test methods developed by Blackman and Kinloch [1] for measuring the Mode I fracture toughness of adhesive systems, and standard test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness of unidirectional composite materials as described in ASTM D5528 [2] have been adapted to the study of woven fabric composite material systems. A summary of results from a variety of studies conducted to determine the effects of material and process variables on the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric composite tooling is presented. These studies include: the effects of cure processing, variations in fabric surfaces treatments, resin selections with a "baseline" fabric, and fabric selections with a "baseline" resin. Use of these results to optimize cure processing, fabric treatments, and resin and fabric selection is discussed. Recent studies using Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric composite material systems to evaluate the effects of simulated tool cycling have encountered issues with secondary crack formation during conduct of the tests. Alternate methods of analysis, such as secondary crack density measurements, are examined. Copyright 2015. Used by CAMX - The Composites and Advanced Materials Expo with permission. Source

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