Janicki Industries

Sedro-Woolley, WA, United States

Janicki Industries

Sedro-Woolley, WA, United States

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News Article | January 2, 2017
Site: compositesmanufacturingmagazine.com

Utah’s aerospace and defense industry is growing, with nearly 950 companies employing more than 31,000 people in the sector in 2015. That’s great news for Utah, but attracting a qualified workforce to employers ranging from aerospace giant Boeing to parts suppliers such as Janicki Industries can be challenging considering the state’s unemployment rate averaged around 3.5 percent in the past year. In 2015, a coalition of government, education and industry partners launched the Utah Aerospace Pathways program to help solve the dilemma. Last spring, 41 high school students from two school districts in Utah completed the pilot program and earned certificates in aerospace manufacturing, providing a direct and accelerated path to employment in the aerospace and defense industry. “The point is to provide not just a job, but a career path,” says Ben Hart, managing director of the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development, which helped spearhead the program. It’s a career path with composites and advanced materials at its core. “Composites are an important part of the Utah economy,” says Hart. “Why wouldn’t we try to do everything possible to line up our K through 12, post-secondary and higher education with future opportunities?” Hart says that industry was the catalyst in getting the Utah Aerospace Pathways program off the ground. “That’s a critical component in any workforce program,” he says. “Industry must be willing to not just be a consumer, but help produce really good workforce programs.” In the spring of 2015, Boeing teamed up with other aerospace companies and approached the Governor’s Office of Economic Development seeking a workforce solution. Hart’s team quickly pulled in other government and education partners. They worked diligently for six months before launching the Utah Aerospace Pathways program in September 2015. The program, which is open to high school juniors and seniors, utilizes a three-pronged approach. During the first semester, students take a 60-hour course at their high schools introducing them to manufacturing basics. The following semester, they enroll in a 48-hour course on aerospace composites and other advanced materials at either Davis Applied Technology College (DATC) in Kaysville, Utah, or Salt Lake Community College. At the same time, students participate in a 48-hour, paid internship at one of the industry partner’s facilities. These include Albany Engineered Composites, Boeing, Hexcel, Hill Air Force Base, Janicki Industries and Orbital ATK. “You’ve got to have the three-legged stool, with high schools, vocational schools and industry working together,” says Kimberlee Carlile, pathways manager for the Governor’s Office of Economic Development. “Students get not only the classroom experience, but hands-on training from vocational schools and industry experience as well.”


"The marine market is the most deeply penetrated of all end markets served by the composites industry. Yachts, sailboats and other boats use lots of marine composites. For decades, composites have been the material of choice for marine manufacturers to build beautiful and innovative boats, ships, pipes and personal watercraft. For some large shipyards, they buy resin and reinforcing material. Generally, they produced the ship. In fact, China is the world's largest fiberglass production areas. Similarly, Chinese produce many glass fiber reinforced plastic ships. In China, there are many companies producing resin matrix and reinforcing material. But, there have little marine composite manufacturers in China. China's main products are composites pipes." Scope of the Report:  This report focuses on the Marine Composites in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. Market Segment by Manufacturers, this report covers  Gurit  Owens Corning  Toray  DuPont  Johns Manville  Hexcel Corporation  Cytec Solvay Group  3A Composites  Future Pipe Industries  SGL Group  National Oilwell Varco  Janicki Industries  Marine Plastics Ltd  Jiumei Fiber Glass  PE Composites  Pipe Composites  Aeromarine Industries Ltd Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers  North America (USA, Canada and Mexico)  Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)  Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)  South America, Middle East and Africa Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into  Powerboats  Sailboats  Cruise liner  Marine composites pipe  Others Global Marine Composites Market by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2021 1 Market Overview  1.1 Marine Composites Introduction  1.2 Market Analysis by Type  1.2.1 Glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRPs)  1.2.2 Foam core materials  1.2.3 Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs)  1.3 Market Analysis by Applications  1.3.1 Powerboats  1.3.2 Sailboats  1.3.3 Cruise liner  1.4 Market Analysis by Regions  1.4.1 North America (USA, Canada and Mexico)  1.4.1.1 USA  1.4.1.2 Canada  1.4.1.3 Mexico  1.4.2 Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)  1.4.2.1 Germany  1.4.2.2 France  1.4.2.3 UK  1.4.2.4 Russia  1.4.2.5 Italy  1.4.3 Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)  1.4.3.1 China  1.4.3.2 Japan  1.4.3.3 Korea  1.4.3.4 India  1.4.3.5 Southeast Asia  1.4.4 South America, Middle East and Africa  1.4.4.1 Brazil  1.4.4.2 Egypt  1.4.4.3 Saudi Arabia  1.4.4.4 South Africa  1.4.4.5 Nigeria  1.5 Market Dynamics  1.5.1 Market Opportunities  1.5.2 Market Risk  1.5.3 Market Driving Force 2 Manufacturers Profiles  2.1 Gurit  2.1.1 Business Overview  2.1.2 Marine Composites Type and Applications  2.1.2.1 Type 1  2.1.2.2 Type 2  2.1.3 Gurit Marine Composites Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share  2.2 Owens Corning  2.2.1 Business Overview  2.2.2 Marine Composites Type and Applications  2.2.2.1 Type 1  2.2.2.2 Type 2  2.2.3 Owens Corning Marine Composites Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share  2.3 Toray  2.3.1 Business Overview  2.3.2 Marine Composites Type and Applications  2.3.2.1 Type 1  2.3.2.2 Type 2  2.3.3 Toray Marine Composites Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share  2.4 DuPont  2.4.1 Business Overview  2.4.2 Marine Composites Type and Applications  2.4.2.1 Type 1  2.4.2.2 Type 2  2.4.3 DuPont Marine Composites Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share  2.5 Johns Manville  2.5.1 Business Overview  2.5.2 Marine Composites Type and Applications  2.5.2.1 Type 1  2.5.2.2 Type 2 3 Global Marine Composites Market Competition, by Manufacturer  3.1 Global Marine Composites Sales and Market Share by Manufacturer  3.2 Global Marine Composites Revenue and Market Share by Manufacturer  3.3 Market Concentration Rate  3.3.1 Top 3 Marine Composites Manufacturer Market Share  3.3.2 Top 6 Marine Composites Manufacturer Market Share  3.4 Market Competition Trend 4 Global Marine Composites Market Analysis by Regions  4.1 Global Marine Composites Sales, Revenue and Market Share by Regions  4.1.1 Global Marine Composites Sales by Regions (2011-2016)  4.1.2 Global Marine Composites Revenue by Regions (2011-2016)  4.2 North America Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  4.3 Europe Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  4.4 Asia-Pacific Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  4.5 South America Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  4.6 Middle East and Africa Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016) 5 North America Marine Composites by Countries  5.1 North America Marine Composites Sales, Revenue and Market Share by Countries  5.1.1 North America Marine Composites Sales by Countries (2011-2016)  5.1.2 North America Marine Composites Revenue by Countries (2011-2016)  5.2 USA Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  5.3 Canada Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  5.4 Mexico Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016) 6 Europe Marine Composites by Countries  6.1 Europe Marine Composites Sales, Revenue and Market Share by Countries  6.1.1 Europe Marine Composites Sales by Countries (2011-2016)  6.1.2 Europe Marine Composites Revenue by Countries (2011-2016)  6.2 Germany Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  6.3 UK Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  6.4 France Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  6.5 Russia Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)  6.6 Italy Marine Composites Sales and Growth (2011-2016)


Arey B.W.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Park J.J.,Janicki Industries | Mayer G.,University of Washington
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials | Year: 2015

This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby clarifying how such composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic and other mechanical deformation processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of large deformation behavior of such natural rigid composites (that may also include teeth and bones) should be based on the presence of interpenetrating phases. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Janicki Industries, University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Type: | Journal: Journal of the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials | Year: 2015

This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites (glass sponge spicules), and thereby clarifying how such composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic and other mechanical deformation processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of large deformation behavior of such natural rigid composites (that may also include teeth and bones) should be based on the presence of interpenetrating phases.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

SEDRO-WOOLLEY, WA, October 31, 2016-- The Skagit STEM Network, formed late last year through the efforts of the Sedro-Woolley School District and City of Sedro-Woolley, has been involved in an intensive planning process to ally K-12 education, higher education, community, and business partners to support STEM learning and opportunity in the Skagit Valley. To support these efforts, the Skagit STEM Network will receive a $200,000 grant over the next two years from Washington STEM to support efforts to advance student access to science, technology, and math education and career opportunities."The Skagit STEM Network can be a game changer for our students, our economy and our region," said Phil Brockman, Superintendent-Sedro-Woolley School District. "STEM education opens doors for every Skagit student to succeed.""Washington STEM is excited to work with the wonderful partners of the Skagit STEM Network," said Washington STEM's Network Director, Lee Lambert. "We have been enthusiastic supporters of their planning process and their vision for STEM education in the community."The initial $30,000 grant awarded last year, started a unique partnership between the Sedro-Woolley School District, City of Sedro-Woolley, Port of Skagit, EDASC, Skagit Valley College and Janicki Industries. During the past year, other partners joined the planning process including: Boy Scouts of America, Mount Baker Council; Children's Museum of Skagit County; Community Action of Skagit County; Girl Scouts of Western Washington; Junior Achievement of Washington; Skagit County Child and Family Consortium; PACCAR; PeaceHealth/United General Hospital; and Skagit County."Our goal was to create strong working relationships between schools, community organizations, government agencies and our business community to enable the development of STEM literacy and with it, the ability for our students to compete in the new economy," said Sedro-Woolley Mayor Keith Wagoner. "And that's what we did."In addition to building partnerships between schools, government, businesses and community organizations, the initial planning effort created a video in conjunction with Sedro-Woolley High School film students, a Skagit STEM website, calendar of STEM events throughout Skagit County, speaker's bureau, and planning materials.This two-year grant marks the formal launch of the Skagit STEM Network as the newest of ten regional networks that partner with Washington STEM. The Network will serve as a clearinghouse for STEM supportive activities to plug into and more effectively leverage efforts. The STEM Network will focus long term on preparing future generations for economic success and create greater connections between Skagit Valley students and local industry.For more information, visit www.SkagitSTEM.com Washington STEM is a statewide nonprofit advancing excellence, equity, and innovation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Launched in March 2011 with support from the business, education, and philanthropic communities, its goal is to reimagine and revitalize STEM education across Washington. For more information, go to www.washingtonstem.org For a complete list and descriptions of the STEM Networks, click here The Skagit STEM Network will provide the resources and a collaborative environment for educators, administrators, businesses and community based organizations that better enable them to help the students of Skagit County, Washington. The intent is to create a scalable program that school districts throughout Skagit County can adopt and participate.The initial $30,000 grant awarded last year started a unique partnership between the Sedro-Woolley School District, City of Sedro-Woolley, Port of Skagit, EDASC, Skagit Valley College and Janicki Industries. During the past year, other partners joined the planning process including: Boy Scouts of America, Mount Baker Council; Children's Museum of Skagit County; Community Action of Skagit County; Girl Scouts of Western Washington; Junior Achievement of Washington; Skagit County Child and Family Consortium; PACCAR; PeaceHealth/United General Hospital; and Skagit County.For further informiatoin, visit www.SkagitSTEM.com


Harper S.I.,Janicki Industries | Applewhite G.,Janicki Industries | Brich J.,Janicki Industries | Zavala M.L.,Janicki Industries
CAMX 2015 - Composites and Advanced Materials Expo | Year: 2015

Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness has been identified as a key characteristic for evaluating and comparing the performance of composite tooling material systems. Test methods developed by Blackman and Kinloch [1] for measuring the Mode I fracture toughness of adhesive systems, and standard test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness of unidirectional composite materials as described in ASTM D5528 [2] have been adapted to the study of woven fabric composite material systems. A summary of results from a variety of studies conducted to determine the effects of material and process variables on the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric composite tooling is presented. These studies include: the effects of cure processing, variations in fabric surfaces treatments, resin selections with a "baseline" fabric, and fabric selections with a "baseline" resin. Use of these results to optimize cure processing, fabric treatments, and resin and fabric selection is discussed. Recent studies using Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric composite material systems to evaluate the effects of simulated tool cycling have encountered issues with secondary crack formation during conduct of the tests. Alternate methods of analysis, such as secondary crack density measurements, are examined. Copyright 2015. Used by CAMX - The Composites and Advanced Materials Expo with permission.


Taly N.,Cal State University | Kliger H.,H.S. Kliger and Associates | Stawski S.,Janicki Industries
SAMPE Journal | Year: 2010

The SAMPE 2010 Conference and Exhibition hosted the 13 Annual Super Light-weight Bridge competition and the 7th Annual Light Weight Wing competition, held May 17-20 at the Washington State Convention Center, Seattle. There were about 75 students attending the exhibition in Seattle. United Testing of Huntington Beach, CA, provide the test machine, and SAMPE provided a large display/test area near the entrance to the exhibition. The four bridge contest categories were the same as last year. Past experience had shown that some schools were getting very good at designing to be open sections. The wings were particularly exciting again in 2014. They were 36 inches wide with winglets that had to support a torque load in addition to the center Span load.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: phys.org

The "spotters" escorted the panel's bright-orange transport platform as it followed invisible tracks embedded in the concrete floor and slid with a tight fit into the big cylindrical autoclave where the part would bake to hardness. Until the automated system for moving these big wing parts is proved, "we do have four people watching it," said Darrell Chic, acting director of 777X wing fabrication. "But the intent is to work our way to autonomous and allow the navigation system to do its thing." Autonomous. Not needing any humans to guide it. The 777X Composite Wing Center in the Seattle-area city of Everett, Boeing's latest venture in advanced manufacturing, marks a significant step toward a future in which much of an aircraft factory's work is done by automated machines and robots. Once the wing skin was inside the giant pressurized oven, the lone operator at a computer station pushed a button. Lights flashed, a klaxon sounded. Slowly, a 55-ton, 28-foot-wide circular door slid into place and locked to form an airtight seal for the seven-hour baking cycle. Eric Lindblad, the newly appointed head of the 777X program, said having machines load the wing parts autonomously is safer and more precise. There isn't room for error inside the oven: When the long stiffening rods called stringers are baked in the autoclave, they'll go in six at a time with just 3 inches of clearance between them. The only necessary human will be the person at the computer. "There'll be one guy that essentially runs this station," Lindblad said. The trend toward automated manufacturing was evident already at Boeing's older area plants. In Frederickson, robots drill 80 percent of the holes in the 787 and 777 tails fabricated there. In Auburn, robots drill the engine heat shields for the 787 and 777 jets, and will do the same for the 737 MAX. Another robot uses lasers to clean the dies used to shape the heat shields. In its most productive factory, the 737 final-assembly plant in Renton, Boeing has replaced the traditional multistory fixtures used to hold wings in place during assembly with smaller, flexible, increasingly automated equipment as it ramps up toward an unprecedented output of 52 planes per month by 2018. Introducing new automation is a challenge: In another new building in Everett, Boeing is struggling to smooth out the kinks in a robotic system for assembling the 777's metal fuselage. Still, a new generation of airplanes like the 787 and 777X built with carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic composite structures have triggered a transformative shift taking automation to a new level. Fabricating complete fuselage barrels or huge wings out of this material is simply not possible by hand. Only robots can lay up the strips of carbon fiber with enough speed and precision. Mark Summers, head of technology at the U.K. government's Aerospace Technology Institute, said increasing automation will allow Boeing and Airbus to ratchet up production rates without adding employees. "Jobs will not be lost, but there will not be so many new jobs created," Summers said during a panel discussion at the Farnborough Air Show in England in July. "I don't see it as an impact on the current aerospace workforce. There's just fewer jobs in aerospace in the future." He foresees blue-collar machinist jobs increasingly supplanted by "more technologically focused" positions operating the machines. However wary machinists may be of what the new technology means for the future, Pete Goldsmith, who led automation-technology projects at Seattle-area companies Electroimpact and Nova-Tech, and now works for a third, MTorres America, said he got "a universally positive reaction" from mechanics at both Airbus and Boeing when he installed equipment to do repetitive riveting. "That's a job that beats you up all day every day," Goldsmith said. "We were replacing an operation that was physically very debilitating for the mechanics." Gary Laws, a Boeing mechanic for more than two decades who operates computer-controlled machines assembling wings in Renton, said automation makes his job much easier. And if this region wants new work in aerospace, he sees no choice but to embrace the shift. "It's the way it has to be," said Laws. "Technology is obviously going to be the future." Today, the current 777's metal wing parts are made largely by machinists in Auburn and Frederickson, then assembled into a wing by machinists in Everett. Though Boeing doesn't provide a detailed breakdown of employment figures, this work certainly provides hundreds of jobs. With the new 777X, that work changes dramatically. But it does stay in the area. Boeing is spending $1 billion to make the giant 777X carbon fiber wing in-house, rather than outsourcing the wing to Mitsubishi, as it did on the 787. Lindblad said that after a production ramp-up that will take a few years, the new wing center will, at peak, employ somewhere between 600 and 900 people. The first production 777X parts that will fly on an airplane won't be made before April. Until then, workers in the wing center are making test parts, used to certify and fine-tune the new manufacturing process. With wing skin No. 1 in the autoclave over on the fabrication side of the wing center, Jerry Schultz operated an Electroimpact machine making wing skin No. 2. White lab coats are required in this "clean room" environment, where an overhead robot like a giant tape dispenser zips back and forth along a 110-footlong mold, building up the skin panel layer by layer. As the robottraverses the part at various angles, it lays down plies of epoxy resin-infused carbon fiber in about 300 separately programmed runs. Between setup, inspections and the robot work, completing a wing skin this way takes six shifts over three days. The goal is to have just two people operating the cell, Boeing said, with possibly another worker floating between it and an adjacent cell also making wing skins. Nearby, similar big Electroimpact machines are making the first 777X spars - the long, U-shaped, single-piece beams to which the leading and trailing edges of each wing attach. Again, just three people will operate a pair of these spar manufacturing cells, says Boeing. The spars will then be inspected by robots that use an ultrasonic probe to check for invisible flaws in the material. An exception to the full automation is the way Boeing is producing four of the 43 stringers, the rods that stiffen each 777X wing. These four are partly made by hand because of their more complex shape. A half-dozen workers - five of them women, who are often preferred by manufacturers for jobs that require meticulous handwork - stood on each side of a long, thin stringer tool, positioning 4-foot-long ribbons of uncured, textilelike carbon fiber. When they'd lain out each piece of fabric by hand, an overhead machine swung over and pressed down to secure it for curing. "For this particular shape ... it turns out to be more cost-effective to do it this way," Lindblad said. It's a mistake to think robots can do it all, said Ben Hempstead, chief of staff and lead mechanical engineer at aerospace-tooling designer Electroimpact. After these 777X skin panels, spars and stringers are fabricated in the wing center, Boeing will deliver them to the main Everett factory building where mechanics will first assemble the pieces into a basic wing box, then add the folding wingtip and the leading- and trailing-edge control surfaces. That assembly process is inherently more labor-intensive. "With wing-box assembly, if in the future it's half-automated, that'll blow my mind," said Hempstead, whose company supplies Boeing and also provided much of the equipment Airbus to build the composite wing of the A350. "Many of the steps require skill and judgment and are very hard to automate," he said. Hempstead said Boeing asked Electroimpact to look at automating one specific 737 wing process in Renton that's done today by about a dozen mechanics. "We couldn't figure out how to do it faster with machines," Hempstead said. And don't even think about robots doing intricate jobs like installing hydraulic tubes and electrical wiring in the crowded space of an airplane wheel well. "Oh, man, nobody has even talked about automating that," Hempstead said. "I can't even envision how you'd do it." After World War II, Boeing gave Washington state a thriving middle class, allowing blue-collar workers - some with only a high-school education - to live the American dream. As robots revolutionize the industry, the region has become a hotbed of leading aerospace-automation firms - including Electroimpact, Nova-Tech and MTorres America as well as Janicki Industries - that are hiring young engineers as fast as they can. But is a golden age of manual labor ending with Boeing's automation drive? In 2005, almost 3,500 machinists in Renton produced 21 single-aisle 737s per month, according to employment data filed with the state. In 2014, just over 6,000 machinists there produced exactly twice as many. As robotic systems and the automated processing of carbon fiber proliferates, that gap is certain to widen. While Boeing employed more than 100,000 in Washington state in the late 1990s, it seems unlikely those days are ever coming back. Its payroll here is down to about 73,000 today. Yet that's still a big workforce, crucially important to the economy. And well-paid manual jobs remain a vital thread in the social fabric of the state. "We can't all be baristas and software engineers," said Electroimpact's Hempstead. At the industry discussion of automation in Farnborough, Craig Turnbull, director of engineering at Electroimpact U.K. who oversees the company's work at the Airbus wing plant in Broughton, Wales, emphasized that "there is a point where man and machine have to meet." Even in a highly robotized auto plant, he said, the car radio is installed by a mechanic. It's too difficult for a robot. And when it comes to hiring an operator for this new equipment, he suggested looking to machinists. "The best person to operate a machine that drills holes is someone who has done it for 20 years by hand," Turnbull said. "They know what they are looking for. They are then becoming more of a quality-control person than actually pushing the drill through a hole." To prepare the next generation of factory workers for such jobs, the state is pushing STEM education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and providing community-college-level training for hands-on careers. Becoming a machine operator will probably require a two-year associate degree with course work on the basics of electromechanics. "These are some of the highest skilled and best compensated jobs in the factory," Hempstead said. John Janicki, president of Janicki Industries, sees the drive toward more automation speeding up, "driven by the need to get the price down." Though expensive to install, he said, robotic systems should allow plane makers to sell more jets over a production run that can last more than 20 years. "If you amortize all the equipment over the life of the program, it's not that big a deal," Janicki said. His firm - currently employing about 750 people in the state and expanding - still regularly hires local people straight out of high school and trains them to operate its sophisticated machines. And he points to a big upside for the Pacific Northwest in having the 777X wing center: After investing so heavily, Boeing needs to use it to the fullest. "It's absolute state of the art. It's not going anywhere," said Janicki. "You have all that equipment and the personnel trained to use it. It'll build 777s, yes. But 50 years from now, they'll still be building something in that plant." Explore further: Airbus wing plant is a model of robotic technology


News Article | November 24, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

The report "Composite Tooling Market by Fiber Type (Carbon and Glass), Resin Type (Epoxy, BMI, and others), Form (Fabric and Prepreg), and Application (Aerospace & Defense, Wind, Automotive, and Others) - Global Forecast to 2021", The composite tooling market is projected to reach USD 551.8 Million by 2021, at a CAGR of 7.35%, between 2016 and 2021. The demand for lightweight and precision tooling propelled growth of the composite tooling market. This demand is further driven by the increasing use of composites in the aerospace and automotive industries. Browse 75 market data Tables and 43 Figures spread through 123 Pages and in-depth TOC on "Composite Tooling Market - Global Forecast to 2021" http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/composite-tooling-market-63004871.html Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. Carbon fiber type comprises a major share in the composite tooling market in terms of value Carbon fibers have the highest share in the composite tooling market due to their lightweight and high strength. These properties make them a suitable tooling material for various applications in the aerospace & defense industry. The parts made from carbon fibers are much stronger than traditional materials such as steel, aluminum, and iron. Carbon fibers have various unique properties like electrical conductivity, high tensile strength, low weight, high temperature tolerance, and high chemical resistance. Owing to lightweight, tools made from carbon fibers provide better dimensional stability to structural composites part. Aerospace & defense is the largest application for the composite tooling market, in terms of volume There is a mass usage of composites in the aerospace industry, with 50% of composites being used in construction of some commercial aircrafts. The use of composites has continuously increased in the composite tooling due to their lightweight, dimensionally stability, and high strength. Due to the increasing use of composites in the aerospace industry, the demand for superior composite tooling is all set to rise. Composite tooling helps in having tool design freedom and high flexibility. North America accounts for a major share of the composite tooling market The growth of the composite tooling market in this region is driven by growing the aerospace and automotive industries due to presence of established players and stringent environmental regulations stressing on the use of lightweight composite materials. The rising demand for more complex, large, and light parts in the aerospace industry has increased the importance of composite tooling. Some of the leading players of the market such as Janicki Industries (U.S.) and Hexcel Corporation (U.S.) have accelerated their R&D efforts to provide good quality composite tooling materials. Some of the key global players prevailing in the composite tooling market are Royal TenCate N.V. (Netherlands), Hexcel Corporation (U.S.), Gurit (Switzerland), Solvay S.A. (Belgium), and others. These players have adopted various organic and inorganic developmental strategies between 2011 and 2016.


DETROIT, Feb. 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Stratview Research announces the addition of a new market research report on Global Tooling Market for Composites Industry by Material Type (Invar, Aluminum, Other Metals, Tooling Prepreg, Infusion, and Others), by End-Use Industry (Aerospace & Defense, Wind Energy, Marine, Transportation, Construction, and Others), by Use Type (Prototype and Serial Production), and by Region (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of the World), Trend, Forecast, Competitive Analysis, and Growth Opportunity: 2017 – 2022. As per Stratview Research, the global tooling market for composites industry is expected to offer an impressive growth of 7.1% CAGR during the forecast period of 2017 to 2022 and reach US $1.5 billion in 2022, which offers an opportunity to the composites industry players to align themselves with the market growth. There are several factors bolstering the growth of tooling market in the composites industry. The author of the report cited increasing penetration of composite materials, especially in the aerospace & defense and transportation industries with the purpose to enhance fuel efficiency and to reduce carbon emissions and an advancement in composite technologies, such as high-pressure resin transfer molding are the primary growth drivers of the market. Based on material, tooling prepreg is expected to remain the largest type in the tooling market for composites industry over the next five years. The material type (tooling prepreg) is projected to witness the highest growth in the same period, propelled by increasing use in high growth markets owning to its excellent coefficient of thermal expansion property. As per the study, aerospace & defense is projected to remain the largest end-use market for tooling in composites industry during the forecast period driven by increasing production rates of composites rich aircraft, such as B787 and A350XWB, advancement in composite technologies, such as AFP and ATL, and increasing use of resin transfer molding process in the aircraft engines. However, transportation industry is likely to exhibit the highest growth in the same period, driven by increasing penetration of composites in the electric and premium vehicles. In terms of region, North America is estimated to remain the largest tooling market for composites industry. The region is the manufacturing capital of aerospace & defense industry with the presence of several small to large composites part manufacturers. Asia-Pacific is likely to grow at the highest rate during the forecast period, driven by growing composites industry. China and India are the growth engines of the Asia-Pacific market. AIP Aerospace Inc, Airtech Advanced Materials Group, Gurit Holding, Hexcel Corporation, Kaman Aerosystems, and Janicki Industries are some of the major tooling manufacturers in the composites industry. This industry research report from Stratview Research provides market intelligence in the most comprehensive manner. The report structure has been kept such that it offers maximum business value. It provides critical insights on the market dynamics and will enable strategic decision making for the existing market players as well as those willing to enter the market. The following are the key features of the research report: Avail free customization options which are listed in the link given below along with the detailed Table of Contents and Report Description. Free customization options for market research report on global tooling market for composites industry. Stratview Research is a global market intelligence firm providing wide range of services including syndicated market reports, custom research and sourcing intelligence across industries such as Advanced Materials, Aerospace & Defense, Automotive & Mass Transportation, Consumer Goods, Construction & Equipment, Electronics and Semiconductors, Energy & Utility, Healthcare & Life Sciences and Oil & Gas. We have a strong team of industry veterans and analysts having an extensive experience in executing custom research projects for mid-sized to Fortune 500 companies in the areas of Market Assessment, Opportunity Screening, Competitive Intelligence, Due Diligence, Target Screening, Market Entry Strategy and Voice of Customer studies. Stratview Research is a trusted brand globally, providing high quality research and strategic insights that help companies worldwide in effective decision making. For any enquiries, please click here

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