Entity

Time filter

Source Type

St. John's, Canada

Halton J.M.,University of Ottawa | Hand J.,Janeway Child Health Center | Byron P.,British Columbia Childrens Hospital | Strother D.,University of Calgary | Blanchette V.,University of Toronto
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2013

Background: A Human Resources (HR) Committee of C17, the national network of Canadian academic pediatric hematology/oncology programs, obtained comprehensive data enabling analysis and planning for the physician workforce. This study establishes physician to patient ratios and predicts workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology programs. Procedures: Over a 10-year period, six surveys were sent to the 17 pediatric tertiary care centers treating children with cancer and blood disorders. Data were obtained on physician demographics, full time equivalent (FTE) positions, and time spent in clinical, research, education, and administrative activities. Survey results were debated at the C17 national meetings to obtain consensus on workload ratios. Results: Since 1999, the pediatric hematologist/oncologist workforce has increased from 71 FTE (43 oncology, 20 hematology, 8 BMT) to 109.5 FTE positions (69.7 oncology, 29.4 hematology, and 10.4 BMT). The median age of pediatric hematologists/oncologists increased from 46 years to 52 years and the male to female ratio changed from 1.8:1 to 0.9:1. The 2011 job profile showed the median time spent on activities was 60% clinical, 15% education, 15% research, and 10% administration. After assessing workload, models of care, and optimal physician FTE per program, the C17 HR Committee recommended a ratio of one oncologist per 15 newly diagnosed patients with malignancy and a ratio of one BMT physician per 15 transplants. For every 2.5 oncologists, a 1.0 hematologist is the minimum required. Conclusion: Physician staffing ratios for pediatric hematology/oncology programs have been established and should be adopted across Canadian academic institutions as a standard. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Tran T.H.,University of Toronto | Mitchell D.,Hematology Oncology | Dix D.,Pediatric Hematology Oncology | Cellot S.,Hematology Oncology | And 16 more authors.
Infectious Agents and Cancer | Year: 2013

Background: Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at high risk of infectious toxicity when treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia chemotherapy protocols optimized in children without DS. Our objective was to determine if children with DS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a different risk of infection when treated with chemotherapy protocols developed for children with DS compared to AML treatment protocols developed for children without DS. Methods. We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study that included DS children ≤ 18 years of age with de novo, non-M3 AML diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2004, and treated at 15 Canadian centers. Patients were monitored for infection from initiation of AML treatment until recovery from the last cycle of chemotherapy, conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relapse, persistent disease or death (whichever occurred first). Trained research associates abstracted all information from each site. Results: There were 31 children with DS included; median age was 1.7 (range 0.1-11.1) years. Eleven were treated according to a DS-specific protocol while 20 were treated with non-DS specific protocols. A total of 157 courses of chemotherapy were delivered. Microbiologically documented sterile site infection occurred in 11.9% and 14.3% of DS-specific and non-DS specific AML treatment courses respectively. Sepsis was rare and there were no infection-related deaths. In multiple regression, treatment with a DS-specific protocol was independently associated with a reduction in microbiologically documented sterile site infection (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.99; P = 0.044), and clinically documented infection (adjusted OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14-0.91; P = 0.031) but not bacteremia (adjusted OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.44-1.22; P = 0.231). Conclusions: Our study suggests that children with DS do not experience excessive infectious toxicity during treatment for AML compared to children without DS. Incorporation of DS-specific AML treatment protocols is associated with a more favorable infection profile for children with DS-AML. © 2013 Tran et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Cada M.,The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto | Segbefia C.I.,The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto | Klaassen R.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario | Fernandez C.V.,Health Center | And 19 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2015

Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a group of rare, heterogeneous genetic disorders with a risk of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation including clonal marrow cytogenetic abnormalities, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. The clinical characteristics, risk classification, prognostic factors and outcome of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation associated with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are largely unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the impact of category, cytopathology and cytogenetics, the three components of the “Category Cytology Cytogenetics” classification of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, on the outcome of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation associated with inherited bone marrow failure. We used data from the Canadian Inherited Marrow Failure Registry. Among 327 patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndrome enrolled in the registry, the estimated risk of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation by the age of 18 years was 37%. The risk of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation varied according to the type of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome but was highest in Fanconi anemia. The development of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation significantly affected overall survival. Mortality varied based on cytopathological group. The largest group of patients had refractory cytopenia. Clonal marrow cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in 87% of patients with clonal and malignant myeloid transformation, and different cytogenetic groups had different impacts on disease progression. We conclude that category, cytopathology and cytogenetics in cases of clonal and malignant myeloid transformation associated with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes have an important impact on outcome and that the classification of such cases should incorporate these factors. © 2015 Ferrata Storti Foundation. Source


Dix D.,Pediatric Hematology Oncology | Cellot S.,Hematology Oncology | Price V.,Health Center | Gillmeister B.,Child Health Evaluative science | And 14 more authors.
Clinical Infectious Diseases | Year: 2012

Background. Infection continues to be a major problem for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Objectives were to identify factors associated with infection, sepsis, and infectious deaths in children with newly diagnosed AML.Methods. We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study that included children ≤18 years of age with de novo, non-M3 AML diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2004, treated at 15 Canadian centers. Patients were monitored for infection from initiation of AML treatment until recovery from the last cycle of chemotherapy, conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relapse, persistent disease, or death (whichever occurred first). Consistent trained research associates abstracted all information from each site.Results. 341 patients were included. Median age was 7.1 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2.0-13.5) and 29 (8.5%) had Down syndrome. In sum, 26 (7.6%) experienced death as a first event. There were 1277 courses of chemotherapy administered in which sterile site microbiologically documented infection occurred in 313 courses (24.5%). Sepsis and infectious death occurred in 97 (7.6%) and 16 (1.3%) courses, respectively. The median days of corticosteroid administration was 2 per course (IQR, 0-6). In multiple regression analysis, duration of corticosteroid exposure was significantly associated with more microbiologically documented sterile site infection, bacteremia, fungal infection, and sepsis. The only factor significantly associated with infectious death was days of corticosteroid exposure (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.08; P =. 001).Conclusions. In pediatric AML, infection, sepsis, and infectious death were associated with duration of corticosteroid exposure. Corticosteroids should be avoided when possible for this population. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. Source


Cellot S.,Hospital Sainte Justine | Johnston D.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario | Dix D.,British Columbia Childrens Hospital | Ethier M.-C.,University of Toronto | And 14 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2013

Background: It is not known whether children with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) have an infection risk similar to non- APL acute myeloid leukemia. The objective was to describe infectious risk in children with newly diagnosed APL and to describe factors associated with these infections.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study that included children ≤ 18 years of age with de novo APL treated at 15 Canadian centers. Thirty-three children with APL were included; 78.8% were treated with APL -specific protocols.Results: Bacterial sterile site infection occurred in 12 (36.4%) and fungal sterile site infection occurred in 2 (6.1%) children. Of the 127 chemotherapy courses, 101 (79.5%) were classified as intensive and among these, the proportion in which a sterile site microbiologically documented infection occurred was 14/101 (13.9%). There was one infection-related death.Conclusions: One third of children with APL experienced at least one sterile site bacterial infection throughout treatment and 14% of intensive chemotherapy courses were associated with a microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates in pediatric APL may be lower compared to non- APL acute myeloid leukemia although these children may still benefit from aggressive supportive care during intensive chemotherapy. © 2013 Cellot et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations