The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology

Los Angeles, CA, United States

The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology

Los Angeles, CA, United States
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Kozlowska A.K.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Kozlowska A.K.,Poznan University of Medical Sciences | Tseng H.-C.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Kaur K.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | And 9 more authors.
Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy | Year: 2016

Natural killer (NK) cells are functionally suppressed in the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor microenvironment. We have recently shown that survival and differentiation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/poorly differentiated tumors are controlled through two distinct phenotypes of cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic/split anergized NK cells, respectively. In this paper, we studied the function of NK cells against brain CSCs/poorly differentiated GBM and their NK cell-differentiated counterparts. Brain CSCs/poorly differentiated GBM, differentiated by split anergized NK supernatants (supernatants from NK cells treated with IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb) expressed higher levels of CD54, B7H1 and MHC-I and were killed less by the NK cells, whereas their CSCs/poorly differentiated counterparts were highly susceptible to NK cell lysis. Resistance to NK cells and differentiation of brain CSCs/poorly differentiated GBM by split anergized NK cells were mediated by interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Brain CSCs/poorly differentiated GBM expressed low levels of TNFRs and IFN-γRs, and when differentiated and cultured with IL-2-treated NK cells, they induced increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 and chemokine IL-8 in the presence of decreased IFN-γ secretion. NK-induced differentiation of brain CSCs/poorly differentiated GBM cells was independent of the function of IL-6 and/or IL-8. The inability of NK cells to lyse GBM tumors and the presence of a sustained release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and chemokine IL-8 in the presence of a decreased IFN-γ secretion may lead to the inadequacy of NK cells to differentiate GBM CSCs/poorly differentiated tumors, thus failing to control tumor growth. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Tseng H.-C.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Cacalano N.,University of California at Los Angeles | Jewett A.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Jewett A.,University of California at Los Angeles
Oncotarget | Year: 2015

The mechanism of suppression of NK cytotoxicity in cancer patients is not clearly established. In this paper we provide evidence that anergized NK cells induce differentiation of healthy Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) or transformed Oral Squamous Cancer Stem Cells (OSCSCs) resulting in cell growth inhibition, resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and prevention of inflammatory mediators secretion. Induction of cytotoxicity resistance in differentiated cells correlated with increased CD54 and MHC class I surface expression and mediated by the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α since antibodies to both, but not each cytokine alone, was able to inhibit resistance. In contrast, inhibition of cytokine and chemokine release was mediated by IFN-γ since the addition of anti-IFN-γ antibody, and not anti-TNF-α, restored secretion of inflammatory mediators in NK cell cultures with differentiated DPSCs and OSCSCs. There was a gradual and time dependent decrease in MHC class I and CD54 expression which correlated with the restoration of NK cell cytotoxicity, augmentation of cytokine secretion and increased cell growth from days 0-12 post NK removal. Continuous presence of NK cells is required for the maintenance of cell differentiation since the removal of NK cell-mediated function reverses the phenotype and function of differentiated cells to their stem-like cells.


Kozlowska A.K.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Kozlowska A.K.,Poznan University of Medical Sciences | Kaur K.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Topchyan P.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | And 2 more authors.
Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy | Year: 2016

Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice—a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Tseng H.-C.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Inagaki A.,University of Miami | Bui V.T.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology | Cacalano N.,The Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

We have recently shown that Natural Killer (NK) cells control survival and differentiation of Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs) through two distinct phenotypes of cytotoxic and anergic NK cells, respectively. In this report, brain CSCs and their serum and NK cell differentiated counterparts were studied. Serum-differentiated brain CSCs were significantly less susceptible to NK cells and CTL direct cytotoxicity as well as NK cell mediated Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC), whereas their CSCs were highly susceptible. The levels of CD44 and EGFR were higher in brain tumor CSCs when compared to the serum-differentiated tumors. No differences could be observed for the expression of MHC class I between brain tumor stem cells and their serum- differentiated counterparts. Moreover, supernatants from the combination of IL-2 and anti- CD16mAb treated NK cells (anergized NK cells) induced resistance of brain tumor CSCs to NK cell mediated cytotoxicity. Unlike serum-differentiated CSCs, NK supernatant induced differentiation and resistance to cytotoxicity in brain CSCs correlated with the increased expression of CD54 and MHC class I. The addition of anti-MHC class I antibody moderately inhibited NK mediated cytotoxicity against untreated or serum-differentiated CSCs, whereas it increased cytotoxicity against NK supernatant differentiated tumors. Therefore, two distinct mechanisms govern serum and NK supernatant mediated differentiation of brain tumors. © 2015 Ivyspring International Publisher.


PubMed | University of California at Los Angeles, The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology and Bon Secours Cancer Institute
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in immunology | Year: 2014

In this paper, we provide evidence that anergized NK cells through secreted factors and direct cell-cell contact have the ability to induce differentiation of healthy dental pulp stem cells and stem cell of apical papillae as well as transformed oral squamous cancer stem cell (OSCSC) and Mia-Paca-2, poorly differentiated stem-like pancreatic tumors, resulting in their resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Induction of NK cell resistance and differentiation in the stem cells correlated with the increased expression of CD54, B7H1, and MHC class I, and mediated by the combination of membrane-bound or secreted IFN- and TNF- from the NK cells since antibodies to both cytokines and not each one alone were able to inhibit differentiation or resistance to NK cells. Similarly, antibodies to both TNF- and IFN- were required to prevent NK-mediated inhibition of cell growth, and restored the numbers of the stem cells to the levels obtained when stem cells were cultured in the absence of anergized NK cells. Interestingly, the effect of anti-IFN- antibody in the absence of anti-TNF- antibody was more dominant for the prevention of increase in surface receptor expression since its addition abrogated the increase in CD54, B7H1, and MHC class I surface expression. Antibodies to CD54 or LFA-1 was unable to inhibit differentiation whereas antibodies to MHC class I but not B7H1 increased cytotoxicity of well-differentiated oral squamous carcinoma cells as well as OSCSCs differentiated by the IL-2+anti-CD16 mAb-treated NK cells whereas it inhibited the cytotoxicity of NK cells against OSCSCs. Thus, NK cells may inhibit the progression of cancer by killing and/or differentiation of cancer stem cells, which severely halt cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis.


PubMed | Bon Secours Cancer Institute, The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, University of California at Los Angeles and University of Miami
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

We have recently shown that Natural Killer (NK) cells control survival and differentiation of Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs) through two distinct phenotypes of cytotoxic and anergic NK cells, respectively. In this report, brain CSCs and their serum and NK cell differentiated counterparts were studied. Serum-differentiated brain CSCs were significantly less susceptible to NK cells and CTL direct cytotoxicity as well as NK cell mediated Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC), whereas their CSCs were highly susceptible. The levels of CD44 and EGFR were higher in brain tumor CSCs when compared to the serum-differentiated tumors. No differences could be observed for the expression of MHC class I between brain tumor stem cells and their serum-differentiated counterparts. Moreover, supernatants from the combination of IL-2 and anti-CD16mAb treated NK cells (anergized NK cells) induced resistance of brain tumor CSCs to NK cell mediated cytotoxicity. Unlike serum-differentiated CSCs, NK supernatant induced differentiation and resistance to cytotoxicity in brain CSCs correlated with the increased expression of CD54 and MHC class I. The addition of anti-MHC class I antibody moderately inhibited NK mediated cytotoxicity against untreated or serum-differentiated CSCs, whereas it increased cytotoxicity against NK supernatant differentiated tumors. Therefore, two distinct mechanisms govern serum and NK supernatant mediated differentiation of brain tumors.


PubMed | The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology and University of California at Los Angeles
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2015

The mechanism of suppression of NK cytotoxicity in cancer patients is not clearly established. In this paper we provide evidence that anergized NK cells induce differentiation of healthy Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) or transformed Oral Squamous Cancer Stem Cells (OSCSCs) resulting in cell growth inhibition, resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and prevention of inflammatory mediators secretion. Induction of cytotoxicity resistance in differentiated cells correlated with increased CD54 and MHC class I surface expression and mediated by the combination of IFN- and TNF- since antibodies to both, but not each cytokine alone, was able to inhibit resistance. In contrast, inhibition of cytokine and chemokine release was mediated by IFN- since the addition of anti-IFN- antibody, and not anti-TNF-, restored secretion of inflammatory mediators in NK cell cultures with differentiated DPSCs and OSCSCs. There was a gradual and time dependent decrease in MHC class I and CD54 expression which correlated with the restoration of NK cell cytotoxicity, augmentation of cytokine secretion and increased cell growth from days 0-12 post NK removal. Continuous presence of NK cells is required for the maintenance of cell differentiation since the removal of NK cell-mediated function reverses the phenotype and function of differentiated cells to their stem-like cells.


Man H.B.,Northwestern University | Ho D.,Northwestern University | Ho D.,The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology
Journal of Laboratory Automation | Year: 2013

Nanoparticles possess a wide range of exceptional properties applicable to biology and medicine. In particular, nanodiamonds (NDs) are being studied extensively because they possess unique characteristics that make them suitable as platforms for diagnostics and therapeutics. This carbon-based material (2-8 nm) is medically relevant because it unites several key properties necessary for clinical applications, such as stability and compatibility in biological environments, and scalability in production. Research by the Ho group and others has yielded ND particles with a variety of capabilities ranging from delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to targeted labeling and uptake studies. In addition, encouraging new findings have demonstrated the ability for NDs to effectively treat chemoresistant tumors in vivo. In this review, we highlight the progress made toward bringing nanodiamonds from the bench to the bedside. © 2013 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.


PubMed | The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Current drug delivery | Year: 2012

Mounting effective anti-tumor immune responses by cytotoxic effectors is important for the clearance of tumors. However, accumulated evidence suggests that the cytotoxic function of immune effectors is largely suppressed in the tumor microenvironment by a number of distinct effectors and their secreted factors. The aims of this review are to provide a rationale and potential mechanism for immunosuppression in cancer, and to demonstrate the significance of such immunosuppression in cellular differentiation and tissue regeneration in pathological conditions, and progression of cancer. We have recently shown that increased NK cell function was seen when they were cultured with primary oral squamous carcinoma stem cells (OSCSCs) as compared to their more differentiated oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCCs). In addition, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were significantly more susceptible to NK cell mediated cytotoxicity than their differentiated counterparts or parental cells from which they were derived. We have also reported that inhibition of differentiation or reversion of cells to a less-differentiated phenotype by blocking NFB or targeted knock down of COX2 augmented NK cell function significantly. Total population of monocytes and those depleted of CD16(+) subsets were able to substantially prevent NK cell mediated lysis of OSCSCs, MSCs and DPSCs. Taken together, our results suggest that stem cells are significant targets of the NK cell cytotoxicity. The concept of split anergy in NK cells and its contribution to tissue repair and regeneration and in tumor resistance and progression will be discussed in this review. Therefore, patients with cancer may benefit from repeated allogeneic NK cell transplantation at the site of the tumor for specific elimination of cancer stem cells.

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