Time filter

Source Type

Terryn W.,Regional Hospital Jan Yperman | Froissart R.,Laboratoire des Maladies Hereditaires du Metabolisme et Depistage Neonatal | Ortiz A.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Pirson Y.,Catholic University of Leuven | And 5 more authors.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation | Year: 2013

Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism resulting in the accumulation of glycolipids including globotriaosylceramide in cells of various tissues resulting in end-organ manifestations. Initially, FD is typically characterized by angiokeratoma and recurrent episodes of neuropathic pain in the extremities occurring during childhood or adolescence. Most affected patients also exhibit a decreased ability to sweat. Later in life, FD results in left ventricular hypertrophy, proteinuria, renal failure and stroke. These later disease manifestations are non-specific and also common in diabetes, hypertension and atheromatosis and thus for most practitioners do not point into the direction of FD. As a consequence, FD is under-diagnosed and screening of high-risk groups is important for case finding, as is a thorough pedigree analysis of affected patients. In the nephrology clinic, we suggest to screen patients for FD when there is unexplained chronic kidney disease in males younger than 50 years and females of any age. In men, this can be performed by measuring α-galactosidase A activity in plasma, white blood cells or dried blood spots. In women, mutation analysis is necessary, as enzyme measurement alone could miss over one-third of female Fabry patients. A multidisciplinary team should closely monitor all known Fabry patients, with the nephrologist screening kidney impairment (glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria) on a regular basis. Transplanted Fabry patients have a higher mortality than the regular transplant population, but have acceptable outcomes, compared with Fabry patients remaining on dialysis. It is unclear whether enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) prevents deterioration of kidney function. In view of the lack of compelling evidence for ERT, and the low likelihood that a sufficiently powered randomized controlled trial on this topic will be performed, data of all patients with FD should be collected in a central registry. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Regional Hospital Jan Yperman
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association | Year: 2013

Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism resulting in the accumulation of glycolipids including globotriaosylceramide in cells of various tissues resulting in end-organ manifestations. Initially, FD is typically characterized by angiokeratoma and recurrent episodes of neuropathic pain in the extremities occurring during childhood or adolescence. Most affected patients also exhibit a decreased ability to sweat. Later in life, FD results in left ventricular hypertrophy, proteinuria, renal failure and stroke. These later disease manifestations are non-specific and also common in diabetes, hypertension and atheromatosis and thus for most practitioners do not point into the direction of FD. As a consequence, FD is under-diagnosed and screening of high-risk groups is important for case finding, as is a thorough pedigree analysis of affected patients. In the nephrology clinic, we suggest to screen patients for FD when there is unexplained chronic kidney disease in males younger than 50 years and females of any age. In men, this can be performed by measuring -galactosidase A activity in plasma, white blood cells or dried blood spots. In women, mutation analysis is necessary, as enzyme measurement alone could miss over one-third of female Fabry patients. A multidisciplinary team should closely monitor all known Fabry patients, with the nephrologist screening kidney impairment (glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria) on a regular basis. Transplanted Fabry patients have a higher mortality than the regular transplant population, but have acceptable outcomes, compared with Fabry patients remaining on dialysis. It is unclear whether enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) prevents deterioration of kidney function. In view of the lack of compelling evidence for ERT, and the low likelihood that a sufficiently powered randomized controlled trial on this topic will be performed, data of all patients with FD should be collected in a central registry.


PubMed | Regional Hospital Jan Yperman
Type: | Journal: JIMD reports | Year: 2013

Fabry disease is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by quantitative or qualitative defects in the lysosomal enzyme alfa-Galactosidase A (aGAL A), ultimately resulting in vital organ dysfunction. Mainly the kidneys, the heart, and the central nervous system are involved. While the classical phenotype of Fabry disease is readily recognizable, screening studies have identified clinical variants. Here, we report the phenotype associated with the GLA p.Ala143Thr (c.427G>A) mutation in 12 patients aged 42-83 years. None of the patients had classical Fabry signs or symptoms as angiokeratoma, hypohidrosis, acroparesthesia, or cornea verticillata. Possible Fabry manifestations were renal failure (5/12), stroke (7/12), and left ventricular hypertrophy (5/12), but these were not necessarily attributable to the p.Ala143Thr mutation, as a cardiac biopsy in one female and left ventricular hypertrophy and kidney biopsies in two males with renal failure and microalbuminuria lacked Gb-3 deposits. The literature data on this mutation as well as data collected in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) database confirm these findings. The association of renal failure, stroke, and left ventricular hypertrophy with this mutation could be the result of selection bias, as most patients were detected in screening studies.We conclude that care should be taken with attribution of vital organ dysfunction to GLA sequence alterations. In case of the p.Ala143Thr mutation, and possibly also other mutations associated with an attenuated phenotype, diagnostic tools such as biopsy and imaging should critically evaluate the relation of end-organ failure with Fabry disease, as this has important consequences for enzyme replacement therapy.

Loading Regional Hospital Jan Yperman collaborators
Loading Regional Hospital Jan Yperman collaborators