New York City, NY, United States
New York City, NY, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Barbesino G.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Tomer Y.,James ters Va Medical Center
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2013

Context: TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) cause Graves' disease (GD) hyperthyroidism. Widely available TRAb measurement methods have been significantly improved recently. However, the role of TRAb measurement in the differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, the prediction of remission of GD hyperthyroidism, the prediction of fetal/neonatal thyrotoxicosis, and the clinical assessment of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) are controversial. Evidence Acquisition: We reviewed and analyzed the literature reporting primary data on the clinical use of TRAb. We focused our analyses on clinical studies analyzing third-generation TRAb assays. Evidence Synthesis: The performance of TRAb in the differential diagnosis of overt hyperthyroidism is excellent, with sensitivity and specificity in the upper 90%. TRAb can accurately predict short-term relapses of hyperthyroidism after a course of antithyroid drugs but are less effective in predicting long-term relapses or remissions. Pregnancies in women with GD with negative TRAb are highly unlikely to result in fetal hyperthyroidism, whereas high titers of TRAb in pregnancy require careful fetal monitoring. GD patients with GO frequently have high TRAb levels. However, there are insufficient data to use the test to predict the clinical course of GO and response to treatment. Conclusions: Third-generation TRAb assays are suitable in the differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. In GD, TRAb should be tested before deciding whether methimazole can be stopped. TRAb should be used in pregnant women with GD to assess the risk of fetal thyrotoxicosis. The use of TRAb in GO requires further studies. Copyright © 2013 by The Endocrine Society.


Aldridge M.D.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Aldridge M.D.,James ters Va Medical Center
Medical Care | Year: 2015

Background: Hospice use has increased substantially during the past decade by an increasingly diverse patient population; however, little is known about patterns of hospice use and how these patterns have changed during the past decade. Objective: To characterize Medicare hospice users in 2000 and 2010 and estimate the prevalence of (1) very short (r1 wk) hospice enrollment; (2) very long (< 6 mo) hospice enrollment; and (3) hospice disenrollment and how these utilization patterns have varied over time and by patient and hospice characteristics. Research Design: Cross-sectional analysis of Medicare hospice claims data from 2000 and 2010. Subjects: All US Medicare Hospice Benefit enrollees in 2000 (N = 529,573) and 2010 (N = 1,150,194). Results: As of 2010, more than half (53.4%) of all Medicare decedents who used hospice had either very short (r1 wk, 32.4%) or very long (< 6 mo, 13.9%) hospice enrollment or disenrolled from hospice before death (10.6%). This represents an increase of 4.9 percentage points from 2000. In multivariable analysis, patients with noncancer diagnoses, the fastest growing group of hospice users, were approximately twice as likely as those with cancer to have very short or long enrollment periods and to disenroll from hospice. Conclusion: The substantial proportion of hospice users with very short or long enrollment, or enrollments that end before death, underscores the potential for interventions to improve the timing and appropriateness of hospice referral so that the full benefits of hospice are received by patients and families. Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams &Wilkins.


Baruch L.,James ters Va Medical Center | Sherman O.,James ters Va Medical Center
Annals of Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2011

OBJECTIVE: To report 2 cases in which point-of-care international normalized ratios (INRs) in dabigatran-treated patients were inaccurate. CASE SUMMARY: A 59-year-old woman with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was started on warfarin. After 3 days, warfarin was discontinued, and the decision was made to switch to dabigatran 150 mg twice a day, which was started 2 days after the warfarin was discontinued. As treatment was being converted from warfarin to dabigatran therapy, the woman's primary care physician referred her to our anticoagulation clinic, where her point-of-care INR was 7.2. A laboratory INR performed approximately 30 minutes later was 1.7. Several repeat point-of-care INRs were elevated and discordant with the laboratory INRs. A second patient, a 52-year-old man, was started on dabigatran after an ablation procedure, as a bridge to warfarin. Approximately 16 hours after a single dose of dabigatran etexilate 150 mg, the point-of-care INR was 1.6. DISCUSSION: Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that is approved for use in thromboprophylaxis of atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. Dabigatran's predictable pharmacokinetic profile allows for a fixed-dose regimen without the need for coagulation monitoring. In certain clinical situations (eg, switching treatment between dabigatran and warfarin), INR testing is performed as part of routine clinical care. During the development program for dabigatran, laboratory testing of INR was performed, with INRs at therapeutic concentrations of dabigatran ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Supratherapeutic concentrations of dabigatran elevated the INR to slightly higher levels, between 1.7 and 2.4. Even at extremely high dabigatran concentrations, the INR was generally in the range of 2.3-3.5. CONCLUSIONS: We advocate laboratory INR testing with simultaneous assessment of the activated partial thromboplastin time in patients who are receiving or who have recently received dabigatran. A prospective evaluation assessing the accuracy of the commonly used point-of-care INR devices in patients receiving dabigatran would confirm our findings with respect to this device and determine whether our findings extend to other commonly used devices.


Tomer Y.,Mount Sinai Medical Center | Tomer Y.,James ters Va Medical Center
Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease | Year: 2014

Recent advances in our understanding of genetic-epigenetic interactions have unraveled new mechanisms underlying the etiology of complex autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) are highly prevalent, affecting 1% to 5% of the population. The major AITDs include Graves disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT); although these diseases contrast clinically, their pathogenesis involves shared immunogenetic mechanisms. Genetic data point to the involvement of both shared and unique genes. Among the shared susceptibility genes, HLA-DRβ1-Arg74 (human leukocyte antigen DR containing an arginine at position β74) confers the strongest risk. Recent genome-wide analyses have revealed new putative candidate genes. Epigenetic modulation is emerging as a major mechanism by which environmental factors interact with AITD susceptibility genes. Dissecting the genetic-epigenetic interactions underlying the pathogenesis of AITD is essential to uncover new therapeutic targets. © 2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Ripoll L.H.,James ters Va Medical Center | Ripoll L.H.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Current Opinion in Psychiatry | Year: 2012

Purpose of Review: Clinical considerations for evidence-based treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are outlined in the context of the best available evidence, discussed with reference to BPD traits currently identified in the upcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 5 (DSM-5) revision. The DSM-5 will highlight refractory affective, interpersonal, and identity symptoms in BPD as potential treatment targets. In addition to providing a framework for clinical decision-making, future research strategies will also focus on neurotransmitter systems of greater relevance to understanding overall personality functioning. Recent Findings: Although only a few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, several meta-analyses and systematic reviews converge on the consensus effectiveness of lamotrigine, topiramate, valproate, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for treating disinhibition and antagonism than negative affectivity, particularly interpersonal facets of such traits. In addition, basic research suggests a future role for modifying glutamatergic, opioid, and oxytocinergic neurotransmitter systems to treat BPD. Summary: Clinicians should utilize omega-3, anticonvulsants, and atypical antipsychotic agents in treating specific DSM-5 BPD traits, notably disinhibition, antagonism, and some aspects of negative affectivity. Future research will focus on normalizing opioid and oxytocin dysregulation, as an adjunct to evidence-based psychotherapy, in an effort to improve interpersonal functioning. © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Zhan H.,James ters Va Medical Center | Zhan H.,Columbia University | Cardozo C.,James ters Va Medical Center | Cardozo C.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Raza A.,Columbia University
British Journal of Haematology | Year: 2013

The chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), including polycythaemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF), are clonal stem cell disorders characterized by dysregulated haematopoietic stem cell expansion and production of red cells, white cells and platelets alone or in combination. An acquired mutation JAK2V617F can be found in all three disorders and shows many of the phenotypic abnormalities of the diseases in murine models. The disease phenotype is also influenced by other unknown genetic or epigenetic factors. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are 18-24 nucleotide single-stranded non-protein-coding RNAs that function primarily as gene repressors by binding to their target messenger RNAs. There is growing evidence that miRNAs regulate haematopoiesis in both haematopoietic stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Here, we review the field of miRNA biology and its regulatory roles in normal haematopoiesis with an emphasis on miRNA deregulations in MPNs. Continued research into how miRNAs impact JAK2V617F clonal expansion, differential haematopoiesis among different MPNs, disease progression and leukaemia transformation will lead to a better understanding of the development of these disorders, their clinical manifestations, and their treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Baruch L.,James ters Va Medical Center
The Annals of pharmacotherapy | Year: 2011

To report 2 cases in which point-of-care international normalized ratios (INRs) in dabigatran-treated patients were inaccurate. A 59-year-old woman with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was started on warfarin. After 3 days, warfarin was discontinued, and the decision was made to switch to dabigatran 150 mg twice a day, which was started 2 days after the warfarin was discontinued. As treatment was being converted from warfarin to dabigatran therapy, the woman's primary care physician referred her to our anticoagulation clinic, where her point-of-care INR was 7.2. A laboratory INR performed approximately 30 minutes later was 1.7. Several repeat point-of-care INRs were elevated and discordant with the laboratory INRs. A second patient, a 52-year-old man, was started on dabigatran after an ablation procedure, as a bridge to warfarin. Approximately 16 hours after a single dose of dabigatran etexilate 150 mg, the point-of-care INR was 1.6. Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that is approved for use in thromboprophylaxis of atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. Dabigatran's predictable pharmacokinetic profile allows for a fixed-dose regimen without the need for coagulation monitoring. In certain clinical situations (eg, switching treatment between dabigatran and warfarin), INR testing is performed as part of routine clinical care. During the development program for dabigatran, laboratory testing of INR was performed, with INRs at therapeutic concentrations of dabigatran ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Supratherapeutic concentrations of dabigatran elevated the INR to slightly higher levels, between 1.7 and 2.4. Even at extremely high dabigatran concentrations, the INR was generally in the range of 2.3-3.5. We advocate laboratory INR testing with simultaneous assessment of the activated partial thromboplastin time in patients who are receiving or who have recently received dabigatran. A prospective evaluation assessing the accuracy of the commonly used point-of-care INR devices in patients receiving dabigatran would confirm our findings with respect to this device and determine whether our findings extend to other commonly used devices.


Baruch L.,James ters Va Medical Center
Postgraduate Medicine | Year: 2013

Novel oral anticoagulants, direct thrombin inhibitors, and factor Xa inhibitors are being introduced into clinical practice. In contrast to vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, these novel agents, because of their relatively wide therapeutic range and predictable pharmacokinetics, have been evaluated in clinical trials and approved for clinical use without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. On occasion, it will be important to assess the anticoagulant status of patients treated with these agents. As a result of their targeted mechanisms of action, they affect standard coagulation assays differently than vitamin K antagonists and heparins, and such assay results may not provide clinically useful information. Thus, less commonly used coagulation assays (eg, chromogenic anti-factor Xa activity assays, diluted thrombin time, and ecarin-based clotting tests) may be introduced into clinical practice. These assays are currently limited by the absence of validated therapeutic targets and lack of standardization across laboratories, vendors, and medication classes. This article provides an overview of the coagulation assays and their potential role in determining the anticoagulant status of patients treated with the emerging anticoagulants. © Postgraduate Medicine.


Riggio S.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Riggio S.,James ters Va Medical Center
Neurologic Clinics | Year: 2011

The neurobehavioral sequelae of TBI consist of a spectrum of somatic, neurologic, and psychiatric symptoms. The challenge for clinicians lies in understanding the interface of the various symptoms and how they interrelate with other entities. Specifically, the challenge is differentiating post-TBI-related symptoms from preexisting or de novo psychiatric, neurologic, and/or systemic disorders. A comprehensive evaluation and a multidisciplinary approach to evaluating patients are essential to be able to develop the differential diagnosis needed to design a management plan that maximizes recovery. © 2011.


Tomer Y.,Mount Sinai Medical Center | Tomer Y.,James ters Va Medical Center
Journal of Autoimmunity | Year: 2010

Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) are complex diseases that develop as a result of interactions between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic and environmental triggers contributing to AITD. The major environmental triggers of AITD include iodine, smoking, medications, pregnancy, and possibly stress. In this review we will focus on two well-documented environmental triggers of AITD, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and interferon alpha (IFNa) therapy. Chronic HCV infection has been shown to be associated with increased incidence of clinical and subclinical autoimmune thyroiditis (i.e. the presence of thyroid antibodies in euthyroid subjects). Moreover, IFNa therapy of chronic HCV infection is associated with subclinical or clinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of cases which can be autoimmune, or non-autoimmune thyroiditis. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) in chronic HCV patients may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of HCV and interferon induced thyroiditis have been well characterized, the mechanisms causing these conditions are still poorly understood. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Loading James ters Va Medical Center collaborators
Loading James ters Va Medical Center collaborators