Krakow, Poland
Krakow, Poland

The Jagiellonian University is a research university founded in 1364 by Casimir III the Great in Kazimierz . It is the oldest university in Poland, the second oldest university in Central Europe and one of the oldest universities in the world. It was positioned by QS World University Rankings as the best Polish university among the world's top 500 and the ARWU as second-best Polish higher-level institution.The university fell upon hard times when the occupation of Kraków by Austria-Hungary during the Partitions of Poland threatened its existence. In 1817, soon after the creation of the Duchy of Warsaw the university renamed as Jagiellonian University to commemorate Poland's Jagiellonian dynasty, which first revived the Kraków University in the past. In 2006, The Times Higher Education Supplement ranked Jagiellonian University as Poland's top university. Wikipedia.


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In this paper, a novel approach to analyze in situ (-)-bornyl acetate (BA) in pichtae essential oil (Siberian fir needle oil, Abies sibirica oil) by means of Raman optical activity (ROA) is reported. As part of this approach, a conformational study in the gas phase of (+)- and (-)-BA has been carried out, predicting the presence of three conformers for each enantiomer at 298.15 K. The structures of these conformers were optimized with density functional theory with the Becke 3LYP functional and 6-311 + + g* basis set. Subsequently, the Raman and ROA spectra were simulated in order to compare them with the experimentally measured spectra of the neat enantiomers of BA. Finally, the combination of Raman and ROA spectroscopy as well as DFT calculations was successfully applied not only for the detection of BA but also for the determination of the specific enantiomer of BA present in the investigated pichtae essential oil samples. Thus, the ROA technique described here has the potential to be used as a fast and easy commercial method to control the quality of essential oils. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Casner K.L.,University of California at Davis | Pyrcz T.W.,Jagiellonian University
Ecography | Year: 2010

Species distributions are a product of contemporary and historical forces. Using phylogenetic and geographic data, we explore the timing of and barriers to the diversification of the Andean butterfly genus Lymanopoda (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae). Clade and species level diversification is coincident with Andean orogeny and Pleistocene glaciation cycles. Lymanopoda has primarily diversified within elevational bands, radiating horizontally throughout the Andes with occasional speciation across elevational boundaries, often associated with ecotones. Narrow elevational ranges and infrequent speciation into adjacent elevational strata suggest that expansion across elevational gradients is relatively difficult. These results are similar to those found in studies of other Andean taxa. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Ecography.


Kersevan B.P.,University of Ljubljana | Kersevan B.P.,Jozef Stefan Institute | Richter-Was E.,Jagiellonian University
Computer Physics Communications | Year: 2013

The AcerMC Monte Carlo generator is dedicated to the generation of Standard Model background processes which were recognised as critical for the searches at LHC, and generation of which was either unavailable or not straightforward so far. The program itself provides a library of the massive matrix elements (coded by MADGRAPH) and native phase space modules for generation of a set of selected processes. The hard process event can be completed by the initial and the final state radiation, hadronisation and decays through the existing interface with either PYTHIA, HERWIG or ARIADNE event generators and (optionally) TAUOLA and PHOTOS. Interfaces to all these packages are provided in the distribution version. The phase-space generation is based on the multi-channel self-optimising approach using the modified Kajantie-Byckling formalism for phase space construction and further smoothing of the phase space was obtained by using a modified ac-VEGAS algorithm. An additional improvement in the recent versions is the inclusion of the consistent prescription for matching the matrix element calculations with parton showering for a select list of processes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Lukowski T.,Jagiellonian University | Rej A.,Imperial College London | Velizhanin V.N.,RAS Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute
Nuclear Physics B | Year: 2010

In this article we calculate the five-loop anomalous dimension of twist-two operators in the planar N = 4 SYM theory. Firstly, using reciprocity, we derive the contribution of the asymptotic Bethe ansatz. Subsequently, we employ the first finite-size correction for the AdS5 × S5 sigma model to determine the wrapping correction. The anomalous dimension found in this way passes all known tests provided by the NLO BFKL equation and double-logarithmic constraints. This result thus furnishes an infinite number of experimental data for testing the veracity of the recently proposed spectral equations for planar AdS/CFT correspondence. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Andrzejak M.,Jagiellonian University | Witek H.A.,National Chiao Tung University
Theoretical Chemistry Accounts | Year: 2011

A systematic multi-reference perturbation theory investigation of the excitation energies and oscillator strengths for the lowest excited states of 2,2′-bithiophene unequivocally shows that its optical spectrum is produced by two 1B u states separated from each other by approximately 1 eV. This picture is confirmed by additional calculations with alternative quantum chemical methods. Our findings are in strong contrast with the previous CASPT2 results of Rubio et al. [J Chem Phys 102:3580 (1995) and Chem Phys Chem 4:1308 (2003)], who predicted that the two lowest 1B u states are quasi-degenerate. The methodological reasons responsible for the previous seemingly erroneous assignment of the optical spectrum of bithiophene are identified and explained in terms of unusually large coupling between the 1B u states introduced by dynamical correlation effects. A general discussion of applicable computational techniques is offered aiming at avoiding similar problems for other molecular systems. © 2011 The Author(s).


Nespolo R.F.,Austral University of Chile | Bacigalupe L.D.,Austral University of Chile | Figueroa C.C.,Austral University of Chile | Koteja P.,Jagiellonian University | Opazo J.C.,Austral University of Chile
Trends in Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2011

During the past 30 years, the evolution of endothermy has been a topic of keen interest to palaeontologists and evolutionary physiologists. While palaeontologists have found abundant Permian and Triassic fossils, suggesting important clues regarding the timing of origin of endothermy, physiologists have proposed several plausible hypotheses of how the metabolic elevation leading to endothermy could have occurred. More recently, molecular biologists have developed powerful tools to infer past adaptive processes, and gene expression mechanisms that describe the organization of genomes into phenotypes. Here, we argue that the evolution of endothermy could now be elucidated based on a joint, and perhaps unprecedented, effort of researchers from the fields of genomics, physiology and evolution. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Domling A.,University of Groningen | Holak T.A.,Jagiellonian University
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2014

No other cancer therapy target class caused more excitement than the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway related. Antibodies against PD-1 and PD-1 ligands represent a therapeutic breakthrough and are the first examples of broadly efficacious and durable cancer immunotherapies. Cancer for the first time seems to have transformed from an often incurable to a "clinically manageable" disease. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 3.46M | Year: 2010

The world-wide demand for primary plant products to be used for food, feed and fuel is increasing dramatically. The foreseen climate changes are expected to have a negative impact on plant productivity in addition. Future agriculture urgently needs new crop plant varieties with enhanced and sustainable productivity. To meet this challenge, CropLife focuses on leaf lifespan as a major determinant of plant productivity and aims to develop new breeding strategies for prolonging leaf photosynthesis and delaying senescence processes. The network focuses on barley and perennial ryegrass, which are excellent models for research and crop development in Europe. The CropLife primary objectives will be addressed in the four workpackages. These are: the identification of key factors initiating senescence (1), and proteins regulating leaf lifespan (2), the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of senescence-associated protein degradation and nitrogen remobilization (3), and the analysis of lifespan and exploitation of genetic variation in lifespan in order to breed new varieties with increased productivity (4). CropLife provides intersectorial experience by integrating partners from the public and private sectors. The training programme includes state-ofthe-art local training activities and network-wide courses, summer schools and workshops. Young researchers will be trained in a range of cutting edge research skills, as well as in complementary skills that will enhance their career prospects. Further benefits will arise from secondments in partner laboratories and intersectorial visits to associated partners from the private sector. To guarantee training at the most advanced level, outstanding scientists in the field will be integrated as visiting researchers. Workshops and a final network conference will provide a platform for dissemination of the networks achievements which are expected to increase the competitiveness of European plant research and agriculture.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra-PP | Phase: INFRA-2010-2.2.10 | Award Amount: 8.01M | Year: 2010

The Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA will be the first open facility for gamma-ray astronomy in the very-high-energy domain, with a performance which is dramatically improved over existing instruments in terms of sensitivity, energy coverage, survey capability and flexibility. CTA will probe non-thermal phenomena in the Universe known to have comparable energy content to other forms of energy such as thermal radiation both in our own Galaxy and at cosmological distances, addressing questions in astrophysics, astroparticle physics, particle physics, plasma physics, cosmology, and fundamental physics. The CTA preparatory phase CTA-PP will address a number of crucial prerequisites for the approval, construction and operation of CTA: > the set-up of a Project Office offering means for electronic communication as well as data storage and handling for documents of the whole consortium > the legal framework, governance schemes, and financial regulations for the following phases of CTA (pre-construction, construction and operation) > assuring funding for the pre-construction phase after termination of CTA-PP > the preparation of funding agreements between potential funding agencies > the preparation of negotiations with potential host countries for the CTA instrument > the detailed technical design and costing of the CTA observatory > the selection of sites for deployment negotiations, and detailing and cost-estimation of the required site infrastructure > the schemes for procurement and industry involvement in the technical design and construction of CTA > the required linking with relevant science communities regarding the detailed definition of the science program, the corresponding final optimisation of the observatory layout, and the definition of user services and data access. For CTA-PP, support is sought primarily for work on the legal, governance and financial issues, for the installation of a project office coordinating and supporting management of CTA-PP as well as the design of CTA and the planning of the implementation, and for studies regarding the optimisation and production of CTA components by industry. The ultimate delivery of CTA-PP will be a detailed implementation plan for the CTA infrastructure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2007-2.2-01 | Award Amount: 5.44M | Year: 2007

Subject of this EU project is the implementation of the FAIR GmbH for the construction of the new research infrastructure FAIR. The "Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research" is an integrated system of particle accelerators which will provide high energy and high intensity beams of ions from antiprotons to uranium with unprecedented quality for basic research in different fields of physics. The total costs of the FAIR project is 1002 M (investment) and 185 M for personnel. Under the supervision of the International Steering Committee the scientific and technical preparations of the project have been evaluated and completed. The necessary legal documents for the establishment of international company FAIR GmbH have been worked out. This EU project concentrates on activities which still have to be successfully completed for the implementation of the FAIR project. The most important task is to achieve an agreement on financial / In-kind contributions to the construction of the facility between the 14 FAIR Member countries and the signing of the Convention, the intergovernmental agreement for FAIR. The Work packages of this proposal are legal issues, finances, governance, FAIR line-management and project management, coordination of research and coordination of accelerator. These activities cover also the start-up phase of the FAIR GmbH, until the FAIR project is successfully implemented. The participants of this application are 12 ministries or funding agencies and 14 research institutions. The activities, subject of this EU project, will be performed by the international project team "FAIR Joint Core Team".


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 7.84M | Year: 2013

Extensive clinical and epidemiological data clearly shows that chronic periodontal disease (PD), the most prevalent infectious inflammatory disease of mankind, is strongly linked to systemic inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD) , rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) . Taking into account that up to 30% of the adult population worldwide suffers from severe periodontitis , the impact of this disease on human health is immense and has been recognized by World Health Organization . Nevertheless, in many EU countries PD is a neglected disease, both by the population in general and health-care personnel. Often this negligence comes to the point that, like a hair-loss, the tooth-loss due to periodontitis is still considered as a normal inevitable event associated with aging. To combat this misconception and conceive novel approaches to prevent and/or treat CVD, RA, and COPD we will explore highly innovative ideas that these non-communicable diseases are at least aggravated, if not initiated, by periodontal infection. Results emanating from our project will: i) elucidate a relationship between the presence of specific periodontal pathogens and severity of systemic diseases; ii) show that extensive periodontal treatment improves clinical parameters of investigated systemic diseases; iii) reveal the impact of eradication of specific periodontal pathogen on the level of inflammatory markers; iv) develop novel, periodontal-pathogen specific bactericidal compounds based on periodontal glutaminyl cyclase (QC), the enzyme essential for these pathogens vitality. This will reduce mortality and ameliorated quality of life of CVD, RA, and COPD patients. All of these will be possible based on the knowledge of mechanisms beyond the causative links between specific pathogen driven periodontal disease and CVD, RA, and COPD revealed by research program outlined in this project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.9.7 | Award Amount: 3.45M | Year: 2012

In dynamics, local behaviour is often very unstable, while global behaviour often is immensely hard to derive from local knowledge. Traditionally, topology has been used in abstracting the local behaviour into qualitative classes of behaviour -- while we cannot describe the path a particular flow will take around a strange attractor in a chaotic system, we can often say meaningful things about the trajectory as an entirety, and its abstract properties.\n\nWe propose to use computational topology, which takes notions from algebraic topology and adapts and extends them into more algorithmic forms, to enrich the study of the dynamics of multi-scale complex systems. With the algorithmic approach, we are able to consider inverse problems, such as reconstructing dynamical behaviorus from discrete point samples. This is the right approach to take for complex systems, where the precise behaviour is difficult if not impossible to analyse analytically.\n\nIn particular we will extend the technique of persistence to include ideas from dynamical systems, as well as incorporating category theory and statistics. Persistence is inherently multi-scale, and provides a framework that will support the analysis of multi-scale systems, category theory provides a platform for a unified theory and joint abstraction layers, and statistics allows us to provide quality measures, inferences, and provide confidence intervals and variance measures for our analyses.\n\nThe combination of these four areas: category theory, statistics, and dynamical systems with computational topology as the joint platform for the three other components, will allow for a mathematically rigorous description of the dynamics of a system from a local to a global scale. In this framework, multi-scale features have a natural place, and the focus on computation and algorithmics means we can easily verify and validate our theory. We propose to do this on two datasets, capturing robot configuration spaces and social media.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-2-2015 | Award Amount: 2.71M | Year: 2016

Transmitting Contentious Cultural Heritages with the Arts: From Intervention to Co-Production (TRACES) aims to provide new directions for cultural heritage institutions to contribute productively to evolving European identity and reflexive Europeanization. To do so, it deploys an innovative ethnographic/artistic approach, focused on a wide range of types of contentious heritage. Attention to contentious heritage is crucial as it is especially likely to raise barriers to inclusivity and convivial relations, as well as to be difficult to transmit to the public. Transmitted effectively, however, it is potentially especially productive in raising critical reflection and contributing to reflexive Europeanization, in which European identity is shaped by self-awareness and on-going critical reflection. Through rigorous and creative in-depth artistic/ethnographic research, TRACES will provide a systematic analysis of the challenges and opportunities raised by transmitting contentious, awkward and difficult pasts. It will do so by setting up Creative Co-Productions (CCPs) in which artists, researchers, heritage agencies and stakeholders work together in longer term engagements to collaboratively research selected cases of contentious heritage and develop new participatory public interfaces. These will be documented and analysed, including educational research. These interfaces, which include online as well as physical exhibitions and other formats, are part of the significant output planned for TRACES, along with academic publications and a novel reflective Contentious Heritage Manual that will synthesise results to provide directions for future practical reflexive transmission of cultural heritage in Europe. TRACES is a multi-disciplinary team, bringing together established and emerging scholars, and providing high-level expertise, relevant experience and creative energy, to provide a rigorous and innovative approach to the transmission of European cultural heritage.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.2-4 | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2009

Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. RN4CAST is a consortium of 15 partners that will quantify in 11 European countries-Belgium, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Netherlands, UK - important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments and qualifications of the nurse workforce impact on nurse recruitment, retention, productivity and patient outcomes. Three partners outside Europe - China, South Africa, and Botswana- provide additional perspectives. Innovative elements of the project include unique measures of workplace dynamics and patient outcomes. Nurse workforce planning initiatives at national and European levels will be reviewed and newly collected data added to enhance accuracy for nurse workforce management. Data collection focuses on general hospitals, which employ the majority of nurses, account for the largest number of medical errors and comprise the largest share of national health expenditures. Each European partner will conduct a study of 20 to 50 hospitals depending on country size yielding information on more than 350 hospitals including surveys from over 50,000 nurses and outcomes of tens of thousands of patients. European partners were selected by geographic distribution, membership duration in the EU, research expertise and availability of patient discharge data. University of Pennsylvania, USA, will contribute specialized research expertise derived from previous international research. RN4CAST will be the largest nurse workforce study ever conducted in Europe, will add to accuracy of forecasting models and generate new approaches to more effective management of nursing resources in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2017

Is there a crisis in the legitimacy of the European Union? That research question is timely and important. Investigating it is also an ideal way of training research leaders of tomorrow to rethink our assumptions about the study of legitimate political order. Whilst, however, the financial crisis has raised new questions about the legitimacy of the EU, existing theories of legitimacy crises are largely based on single-state political systems. New theory is, therefore, needed to understand what would count as legitimacy crises in the case of a non-state political system such as the EU. PLATOs (The Post-Crisis Legitimacy of the EU) ESRs will work together as a team to build new theory from 15 investigations into different standards and actors with whom the EU may need to be legitimate. ESRs will go well beyond the state-of-the-art by building a theory of legitimacy crisis in the EU from a uniquely interdisciplinary understanding of how democracy, power, law, economies and societies all fit together with institutions within and beyond the state to affect the legitimacy of contemporary political order. By developing the analytical tools needed to understand a core predicament in which the EU may both need to develop legitimate forms of political power beyond the state and find those forms of power hard to achieve, PLATO will train ESRs with the conceptual clarity needed to define new research questions at the very frontiers of their disciplines and the methodological skills needed to research those questions. They will also be prepared for careers in the non-academic sector (policy-advice, consulting, civil society, European institutions and expert bodies). PLATOs ambitious cross-university, cross-country and cross-sectoral programme of research training, supervision and secondments will pool resources from a unique network of 9 research-intensive universities and 11 non-academic partners who are themselves key users of state-of-the-art social science research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-1-01 | Award Amount: 3.21M | Year: 2009

Obesity has been estimated to cost the EU some 70 annually through health care costs and lost productivity, and additionally over-consumption of salt, sugar and saturated fats and under-consumption of fruit and vegetables cause almost 70,000 premature deaths annually in the UK alone. Member States have initiated a variety of policy interventions to encourage healthy eating including prohibitions on advertising certain foods to children, promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, nutrition labelling, dialogue with food industry to improve food product composition and regulation of school meals and public sector canteens to ensure healthy food offerings. Rarely have these been evaluated in a systematic manner. The EATWELL project will gather benchmark data on healthy eating interventions in Member States and review existing evaluations of the effectiveness of interventions using a 3 stage procedure: 1. The impact of the intervention on consumer attitudes, consumer behaviour and diets; 2. The impact of the change in diets on obesity and health; 3. The value attached by society to these changes, measured in life years gained, cost savings and QALYs. Where evaluations have been inadequate EATWELL will gather secondary data and analyse them using models mainly from the psychology and economics disciplines. Particular attention will be paid to lessons that can be learned from the private sector that are transferable to the healthy eating campaigns in the public sector. Through consumer surveys and workshops with other stakeholders, EATWELL will assess the acceptability of the range of potential interventions. Armed with scientific quantitative evaluations of policy interventions and their acceptability to stakeholders, EATWELL will recommend most appropriate interventions for Member States and the EU, provide a one-stop guide to methods and measures in intervention evaluation, and outline data collection priorities for the future.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.23. | Award Amount: 8.59M | Year: 2012

CALIPSO coordinates the European synchrotrons and FELs, including the three ESFRI roadmap projects European XFEL, EuroFEL and the ESRF Upgrade Programme, towards a fully integrated network. The consortium is characterised by common objectives, harmonised decisions, transnational open access based on excellence and joint development of new instruments. Innovative networking initiatives address user friendliness and a strengthened industrial interaction. CALIPSO proposes a single entry point (www.wayforlight.eu) to simplify access modalities, to coach potential users to find the best beamline for their experiment and to favour interactivity; in addition, targeted education actions will widen and strengthen the community. Transnational Access potentially benefits a community of 10,000 European users represented by the recently formed European Synchrotron User Organisation (www.ESUO.org). The pivotal EC funding in CALIPSO supports scientists to perform their research at the best facilities, thus promoting equal opportunities for all European researchers. This is particularly important for colleagues from less-favoured countries, early stage and female researchers. The European light sources represent a largely underexploited pool for European industry. To enhance light sourceindustry interactions, CALIPSO proposes a networking activity including specific events to involve industries both as users and instrumentation suppliers, a pan-European Industrial Advisory Board to orient these actions, in preparation for Horizon 2020, and a dedicated task to exploit the innovation potential of the Joint Research Activity. The CALIPSO joint research activity will focus on detectors development, one of the most significant joint challenges for present and future light sources. For Europe to succeed and remain a leader in detectors development, a coordinated action is necessary rather than individual efforts. A close collaboration of the CALIPSO JRA and the industrially-driven action will be setup with the recently signed Detector Consortium initiative, lending an important added dimension with pan-European impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2016

The development of effective novel drugs - especially for rare and neglected diseases - is one of the biggest challenges of the upcoming decades, as illustrated by the recent Ebola outbreak. Moreover, European innovation in new drug registrations is dramatically falling behind compared to the US and Asia. The principal aim of the AEGIS ITN is to implement the first comprehensive, intersectoral cross-disciplinary and structured curriculum for doctoral students in the European Research Area by establishing a unique training platform for the next generation of European researchers in early drug discovery. A significant added value is provided through networking with key European pharmaceutical companies. A key research aim of AEGIS is improving the efficiency and success of early stage drug development by combining innovative methods and techniques to tackle difficult but promising targets (i.e. protein-protein interactions), as potentially valuable drug targets are often neglected due to the high risk associated with their validation. The consortium joins leading academic and industry researchers in an open innovation environment for innovative drug development in Europe. It is supported by several additional partners and stakeholders in the field. Integrated training of the fellows takes place at the host institute and by secondments, research schools and individual training within the AEGIS network. The scientific training includes complementary skills, management, intellectual property rights, fund raising, communication and career planning. AEGIS will improve the availability of a highly skilled workforce for European industries and research, greatly enhance the employability and the career perspectives of young researchers for academia as well as for industry, and will be the seed of a sustainable development in innovative drug discovery, in particular for rare and neglected diseases.


The subject of the present invention is a supported catalyst for the abatement of nitrogen(I) oxide especially from nitric acid plants as well as from other sources of gases emitted to atmosphere, and a method for its manufacture. The method for the preparation of the catalyst is characterised in that it contains an active phase of a spinel structure composed of cobalt oxide and zinc oxide at a weight ratio of 4-8:1 in terms of straight oxides Co_(3)O_(4):ZnO and an alkaline promoter in the form of potassium at a weight ratio of 50-120:1 with respect to Co_(3)O_(4), loaded on a formed support composed of -Al_(2)O_(3), whereas the amount of the active phase is 1-25% wt., preferably 5-20% wt. of the catalyst.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.1.4.4. | Award Amount: 10.33M | Year: 2009

Our capacity to effectively sustain biodiversity across spatial and temporal scales is an essential component of European environmental sustainability. Anthropogenic and environmental pressures on biodiversity act differently at different scales. Consequently, effective conservation responses to these threats must explicitly consider the scale at which effects occur, and therefore it is crucial that administrative levels and planning scales match the relevant biological scales. The SCALES project will provide the scientific and policy research needed to guide scale-dependent management actions. It will assess and model the scaling properties of natural and anthropogenic processes and the resulting scale-dependencies of the impacts of these pressures on various levels of biodiversity from genes to ecosystem functions. To facilitate these assessment methods for upscaling and downscaling biodiversity data will be reviewed and improved. SCALES will further evaluate the effectiveness of management and policy responses to biodiversity loss in terms of their scale-relevance and will develop new tools for matching their scales to relevant biological scales. Finally, a resulting methodological and policy framework for enhancing the effectiveness of European biodiversity conservation across scales will be developed and tested. This framework focuses on networks of protected areas and regional connectivity. This framework will be disseminated to a wide range of relevant users via a web based support tool kit (SCALE-TOOL) and by means of further dissemination channels, such as conferences, publications, and the mass media.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IRSES | Award Amount: 254.10K | Year: 2012

The main objective of the project is to focus theoretical, experimental and clinical research of the participating groups on biomagnetism phenomena, with the specific aim to develop all-optical sensors dedicated to their detection and suitable for applications in clinical diagnostics. A central role in the project is played by Optical Atomic Magnetometers (OAMs) that have the potential, in terms of sensitivity and budget, for a widespread use in hospitals. OAMs have the needed sensitivity and a very small sensor head, allowing for excellent spatial resolution and optimum coupling. We will develop OAMs specifically for clinical use. We will also adopt an original approach to magnetic shielding that consists of compensating rather than screening spurious magnetic fields. This eliminates the need for an expensive mu-metal isolated room, which would make a large scale use of OAMs in hospitals difficult. The project sees the participation of 10 research groups from Italy, United Kingdom, Bulgaria, Israel, Armenia, Russia, India, Poland, USA. Nine teams (UniSi, IEBAS, UCL, IAE, IPR, JU, UCB, UC) involved in the project have long-lasting collaboration activities. The groups have the needed competences covering physics as well as medical issues. This makes an efficient transfer of knowledge between the teams absolutely essential. We will establish links between groups, based on complementary competences. Knowledge transfer will be obtained with a reciprocal exchange of young and senior researchers. The obtained results will be transmitted to all involved groups.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 5.02M | Year: 2009

There is widespread concern about how production and use of chemicals affect the environment. Yet food production and benefits of chemical products are vital for the functioning of European societies. In order to ensure sustainable use, EU regulations require extensive risk assessment before a chemical is approved for use. Current risk assessments focus on risk at the level of individual organisms, but according to EU directives the protection goal aims at achieving sustainable populations. Population-level effects depend not only on exposure and toxicity, but also on important ecological factors that are impossible to fully address empirically. Mechanistic effect models (MEMs) enable the integration of these factors, thus increasing the ecological relevance of risk assessments as well as providing vital understanding of how chemicals interact with ecosystems. Such understanding is crucial for improving risk mitigation strategies and ecosystem management. So far, however, regulators and industry have lacked understanding of the potential benefits that MEMs can deliver, and academics have been inconsistent in the approaches applied. This has led to scepticism about models, preventing a wider use of MEMs in risk assessment. Examples clearly demonstrating the power of MEMs for risk assessment are urgently needed, and industry, academia and regulatory authorities across Europe need scientists that are trained in both MEMs and regulatory risk assessment. CREAM will develop and experimentally validate a suite of MEMs for organisms relevant for chemical risk assessments. The consortium includes the main sectors involved (industry, academia, regulators) and will formulate Good Modelling Practice that will be followed in all individual projects, thus leading to consistency and transparency. CREAM will provide world class training for the next generation of ecological modellers, emphasizing transparency and rigorous model evaluation as core elements of the modelling process.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.20. | Award Amount: 12.58M | Year: 2012

The Project promotes the access to five European Research Infrastructures, and it is structured into nine Networking Activities, plus the Management of the Consortium, and fourteen Joint Research Activities. The Project will profit of the success of the previous HadronPhysics project in FP6 and the current HadronPhysics2 in FP7, and originates from the initiative of more than 2.500 European scientists working in the field of hadron physics. Hadron physics deals with the study of strongly interacting particles, the hadrons. Hadrons are composed of quarks and gluons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromo Dynamics, the theory of the strong force. Hadrons form more complex systems, in particular atomic. Under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, hadrons may loose their identity and dissolve into a new state of matter similar to the primordial matter of the early Universe. The Networking Activities are related to the organization of experimental and theoretical collaborative work concerning both ongoing activities at present Research Infrastructures and planned experiments at future facilities. In hadron physics the close interaction between experimentalists and theoreticians is of paramount importance. The Joint Research Activities concentrate on technological innovations for present and future experiments. Applications in material science, medicine, information, technology, etc., represent natural fall-outs. The main objective of this Integrating Activity is to optimize the use and development of the Research Infrastructures existing in Europe working in the field of hadron physics. The Project aims as well at structuring, on European scale, the way Research Infrastructures operate, and at fostering their joint development in terms of capacity and performance. The approach used is the bottom up approach, to respond to the needs of the scientific community in all fields of science and technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 7.08M | Year: 2014

Aging populations, rising costs and sustainable delivery of high-quality care are increasingly common concerns in all EU countries. PACE aims to perform comparative effectiveness research concerning palliative care in long term care facilities (LTCFs) in Europe. While a growing number of older people will require palliative care in institutionalized settings, palliative care has only recently begun to be developed in LTCFs and effectiveness research hardly exists. PACE aims to compare, in six EU countries (BE, UK, IT, FI, PL, NL) (1) the effectiveness of health care systems with and without formal palliative care structures in LTCFs on patient and family outcomes quality of dying, quality of life quality of palliative care and cost-effectiveness, by performing a representative cross-sectional study in 48 LTCFs per country to include at least 1,152 deceased residents (2) the impact of the UK palliative care health service intervention Route to Success on patient outcomes, family and staff in LTCFs, by performing a controlled cluster trial across the six countries, randomly allocating 24 LTCFs to intervention and 24 to control. The PACE consortium brings together leading academic partners from multiple disciplines with EU organizations/networks actively tapping into the most important professional groups and policy-makers in the field, making it possible to influence research, practice, policy and public at national and international level in and beyond participating PACE countries. PACE will help to achieve the objectives of the European 2020 Strategy, specifically the European Innovation Partnership on Healthy and Active Aging. Based on its study results, PACE will develop tools to assist practitioners and policy and decision-makers to make evidence-based decisions regarding best palliative care practices in LTCFs. This will ultimately lead to optimizing the delivery of palliative care to the large proportion of EU citizens living and dying in old age.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: Fission-2009-3.1.1 | Award Amount: 21.29M | Year: 2010

The aim of DoReMi is to promote the sustainable integration of low dose risk research in Europe in order to aid the effective resolution of the key policy questions identified by the High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on Low Dose Risk Research (www.hleg.de). DoReMi provides an operational tool for the development of the proposed MELODI platform (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Risk Re-search Initiative) consisting of major national bodies and research programmes that have long term commitment in low dose risk research in Europe. A Letter of Intent between the core members of MELODI has been signed in April 2009. During the project, new members are expected to join the Initiative. The Joint Programme of Activities (JPA) of DoReMi includes: (i) a Joint Programme of Research (JPR) covering the issues outlined above and providing an overview of the needs for research infra-structures of pan-European interest and facilitating multilateral initiatives leading to better use and development of research infrastructures; (ii) a Joint Programme of Integration (JPI) to develop a coor-dinated European roadmap for the long term needs of the key players in Europe; and (iii) a Joint Pro-gramme for the Spreading of Excellence (JPSE), covering knowledge management, training and mo-bility and its implementation. The JPR focuses on the areas identified by the HLEG as the most prom-ising in terms of addressing/resolving the key policy questions, namely: the shape of dose response curve for cancer, individual susceptibilities and non-cancer effects. Radiation quality, tissue sensitivity and internal exposures will be addressed as cross cutting themes within the three main research areas. A substantial proportion of the JPA will be dedicated to the joint programme of research. The pro-gramme describes a multidisciplinary approach including interfaces with the broader biological toxico-logical and epidemiological communities. Strategic planning will be carried out in close collaboration with MELODI. The long term Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) will be developed by MELODI, whereas DoReMi research priorities are based on a shorter term Transitional Research Agenda (TRA), focusing on goals that are feasible to achieve within the 6 year project and areas where barriers need to be removed in order to proceed with the longer term strategic objectives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SiS-2010-2.2.3.1 | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2010

The EU lags behind its global competitors when it comes to the number of MST graduates. A special effort is required to close this gap. The overall aim of the SECURE project is to make a significant contribution to a European knowledge-based society by providing relevant research data that can help policy makers to improve MST curricula and their implementation throughout the EU in order to prepare children from an early age on for future careers in MST, whilst at the same time making MST more accessible and enjoyable for all children so that they will keep a vivid interest in science and technology, and understand the importance of their societal role. SECURE will focus on the 5 13 age group, because the foundation for a revived interest in MST can best be laid at an early age, when children are most susceptible for the wonders of the world that surrounds them. A rigorous research programme conducted by the SECURE consortium will scrutinise and compare current MST curricula for pupils aged 5, 8, 11 and 13 in the member states as they are intended by the authorities, implemented by the teachers and perceived by the learners. The instruments used to this end will consist of a transnational comparative screening instrument for MST curricula, of teacher and learner questionnaires and of a lesson observation instrument. The cornerstone of the valorisation strategy of the research outcomes will be the direct and active involvement of a transnational expert group of research and curriculum development institutions that will provide feedback as well as a direct access to policy makers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.82M | Year: 2013

Particulate materials, e.g. pharmaceutical formulations, precious metal, fine chemical, metal & ceramic powders, have been compacted to produce a wide range of particulate products in a number of industrial sectors. The diversity of particulate materials and the complexity of manufacturing processes make it a challenging task in product development and process design for particulate product manufacturing. In particular, their applications in manufacturing high value-added products (such as pharmaceuticals and catalysts) are constrained by a number of scientific and technology hurdles. IPROCOM will address these challenges in a timely manner by bringing together 4 leading European research groups from world-leading universities, 2 national research institutes, and 8 private partners (including 4 SMEs), through a coordinated research and training programme. Our vision is to develop robust in silico process models that can be used to predict the properties of intermediate (ribbons/granules) and final products (tablets/pellets/components) based on the properties of individual particles with identified optimal process conditions and formulations. This will be an innovative and economic tool for product developments, especially for high value-added products. The model will be developed through thorough process understanding and natural synergy of a range of advanced modelling techniques. Our vision will be realised through close collaborations among the partners involved in this truly multidisciplinary IPROCOM consortium, who specialise in complementary areas and possess a broad range of research infrastructures. This will be further enhanced by training a cohort of 12 ESRs and 3 ERs, who will be the next generation technology leaders with the necessary depth and breadth of experience combined with the research and transferable skills to work effectively across disciplinary and sectoral boundaries and competences in applying the in silico tools.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-3.1-01 | Award Amount: 1.98M | Year: 2008

The dejuvenation and ageing of Europes population puts society for some major challenges. The development towards a knowledge-based society requires continues investment in new knowledge and skills. Given the ageing of the population and low fertility rates it also requires high(er) participation rates of females and people over fifty. So far, employers and governments policies have focused on human capital investments for the younger age categories and have stimulated older workers to retire at a relatively early age, in stead of investing in sustainable workers throughout the life course. This proposal aims for an ambitious, exhaustive examination of the forces and mechanisms behind employers and governments behaviour and the resulting societal arrangements. To that aim it will use large-scale surveys for the analyses of employers behaviour and desk research and interviews to map government behaviour. Statistical and focus group analyses will be used to get insight in the participation and activity rates of people between 50 to 70. Next, the project tries to identify good practices at the company level and at the level of (national or local) government policies that contribute to continuous investment in knowledge and skills throughout the life course, resulting in high activity rates for people between 50 and 70.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.1.1-6 | Award Amount: 16.02M | Year: 2008

Lipids are central to the regulation and control of cellular processes by acting as basic building units for biomembranes, the platforms for the vast majority of cellular functions. Recent developments in lipid mass spectrometry have set the scene for a completely new way to understand the composition of membranes, cells and tissues in space and time by allowing the precise identification and quantification of alterations of the total lipid profile after specific perturbations. In combination with advanced proteome and transcriptome analysis tools and novel imaging techniques using RNA interference, it is now possible to unravel the complex network between lipids, genes and proteins in an integrated lipidomics approach. This project application of the European Lipidomics Initiative (ELife; www.lipidomics.net) will address lipid droplets (LD) as dynamic organelles with regard to composition, metabolism and regulation. LD are the hallmark of energy overload diseases with a major health care impact in Europe. The project will exploit recent advances in lipidomics to establish high-throughput methods to define drugable targets and novel biomarkers related to LD lipid and protein species, their interaction and regulation during assembly, disassembly and storage. Translational research from mouse to man applied to LD pathology is a cornerstone of this project at the interface between research and development. To maximize the value of the assembled data generated throughout the project, LipidomicNet as a detailed special purpose Wiki formate data base will be developed and integrated into the existing Lipidomics Expertise Platform (LEP) established through the SSA ELife project (www.lipidomics-expertise.de). ELife collaborates with the NIH initiative LIPID MAPS (www.lipidmaps.org) and the Japanese pendant Lipidbank (www.lipidbank.jp) and is connected to the Danubian Biobank consortium (SSA DanuBiobank, www.danubianbiobank.de) for clinical lipidomics.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-1 | Award Amount: 8.25M | Year: 2012

Background: A significant proportion of pre-diabetics, show macro and micro vascular complications associated with hyperglycaemia. Although many trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lifestyle and pharmaceutical interventions in diabetes prevention, no trial has evaluated the extent to which mid- and long-term complications can be prevented by early interventions on hyperglycaemia. Aims: To assess the long-term effects on multiple complications of hyperglycaemia of early intensive management of hyperglycaemia with sitagliptin, metformin or their combination added to lifestyle intervention (LSI) (diet and physical activity), compared with LSI alone in adults with non-diabetic intermediate hyperglycaemia (IFG, IGT or both). Study Design: Long-term, multi-centre, randomised, partially double blinded, placebo controlled, phase-IIIb clinical trial with prospective blinded outcome evaluation. Participants will be randomised to four parallel arms: 1) LSI \ 2 placebo tablets/day; 2) LSI \ 2 Metformin tablets of 850 mg/day; 3) LSI \ 2 Sitagliptin tablets of 50 mg/day; 4) LSI \ 2 tablets of a fixed-dose combination of Sitagliptin 50mg and Metformin 850 /day. Active intervention will last for at least 3 years, and additional follow-up up to 5 years. Setting and population: Males and Females with pre-diabetes (IFG, IGT or both) aged 45 to 74 years selected from primary care screening programs in 15 clinical centres from 12 countries: Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey. (N=3000) Main Outcomes: The primary endpoint is a combined continuous variable: the microvascular complication ndex (MCI) composed by a linear combination of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Scale (ETDRS) score (based on retinograms), the level of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio, and a measure of distal small fibre neuropathy (sudomotor test by SUDOSCAN), measured during baseline visit and at 36th and 60th month visits after randomisation. In addition, this project will include the evaluation of early novel serological biomarkers of systemic inflammation, early micro-vascular damage, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, and measures of quality of life, sleep quality (somnograms) and neuropsychological evaluation. Vascular function and structure will be evaluated in a subset of participants (n=1000), including cIMT and microvascular endothelial function measured by EndoPAT. Expected results: By evaluating the effect of aggressive treatments in pre-diabetes for the early prevention of diabetes complication, this project has the potential of changing the current paradigm of early management of hyperglycaemia. The ultimate goal is the development of a standardized core protocol for the early prevention of microvascular and other complications, impacting social cost as a result not only in health care, but also in disabilities at work.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2012.5.1-1 | Award Amount: 8.43M | Year: 2013

The European Court of Justice expects European citizenship to become the fundamental status of nationals of the Member States. It lies at the heart of the European integration process. The treaties, legislation, and case law have given Europeans an increasing number of rights. Yet the European Commission complains that these remain underused. Therefore, it has included in FP7 a call for a large-scale IP, identifying and analyzing barriers to exercising such European citizenship rights. Utrecht University is initiating a response to this call. In its project proposal it identifies research questions and several categories of potential hindrances as answers to some of them: contradictions between different rights, multilevel rights, and differences in priorities Member States accord these rights; differences in political, administrative, and legal institutions; financial restraints; lack of sufficient solidarity; administrative and bureaucratic hurdles; language problems; and other practical barriers to claiming and exercising rights - and related duties. Furthermore we distinguish citizenship rights by the types of rights - economic, social, political, and civil - and by the ascribed characteristics of the subjects of these rights: male and female, young and old, native and immigrant. We believe multidisciplinarity will help in identifying and analyzing barriers to the exercise of European citizenship. We can learn from other times and places; therefore we add a historical and comparative dimension to the analysis. And we aim to combine insights from the historical, legal, and social sciences. Overall we want to investigate the options for a multilayered citizenship true to the EUs motto In Varietate Concordia. The research questions and theoretically identified barriers will be investigated in 12 different work packages, each containing specific research objectives, tasks, roles of the participants, and deliverables


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2013

INsecTIME seeks to train the next generation of ESRs in the intellectual, technological, complementary and commercial skills required for future European competitiveness in the area of biological timing, an area with considerable commercial potential. The scientific focus will be on circadian and seasonal rhythms in the model insect, Drosophila, which has proved particularly relevant for understanding temporal aspects of human health and well-being, plus non-model insects such as the parasitoid wasp and olive fruitfly, two species with major economic implications. The work is multidisciplinary, bringing together scientists from academia and the private sector with different skills in neurogenetics, genomics, life history biology, mathematical modelling, biocomputing, biological control, anatomy and population genetics. Through synergistic interactions via secondments to world class research institutions and to applied entomology and biocomputing SMEs, training workshops, and instruction in transferable skills, young researchers will learn the full-range of cutting-edge technical skills allied to an appreciation of the commercial possibilities of their work. Their obligatory secondments to SMEs will include training in the management, organisation and finance of the private sector, and be buttressed by further workshop courses in general bio-commerce, intellectual property, marketing, raising capital etc. They, and their supervisors will contribute to outreach programmes, and the ERSs and ERs will be guided in the development of their own personal career portfolios, with ESRs submitting doctoral theses. Our young researchers will represent the next crop of technically well-trained, but unusually, commercially aware, computer and mathematically literate molecular neurogeneticists, whose versatile skills will enhance pan-European collaborations for years to come.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2009.2.1.4.1 | Award Amount: 4.79M | Year: 2010

Pollinators form a key component of European biodiversity, and provide vital ecosystem services to crops and wild plants. There is growing evidence of declines in both wild and domesticated pollinators, and parallel declines in plants relying upon them. STEP will document the nature and extent of these declines, examine functional traits associated with particular risk, develop a Red List of some European pollinator groups, in particular bees and lay the groundwork for future pollinator monitoring programmes. We will also assess the relative importance of potential drivers of such change, including climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogens, alien species, light pollution, and their interactions. We will measure the ecological and economic impacts of declining pollinator services and floral resources, including effects on wild plant populations, crop production and human nutrition. STEP will review existing and potential mitigation options, providing novel tests of their effectiveness across Europe. Our work will build upon existing datasets and models, complemented by spatially-replicated campaigns of field research to fill gaps in current knowledge. We will integrate our findings in a policy-relevant framework, creating Evidence-based Decision Support tools. We will also establish communication links to a wide range of stakeholders across Europe and beyond, including policy makers, beekeepers, farmers, academics and the general public. Taken together, our research programme will make great steps towards improving our understanding of the nature, causes, consequences and potential mitigation of declines in pollinator services at local, national, continental and global scales.


IRRESISTIBLE In the project IRRISITIBLE partners work together to make young people more aware about Responsible Research and Innovation issues. Universities and science centres will cooperate in the project using the expertise they have in linking formal land informal learning. For a long term effect the project focusses on teacher training. Each partner will form a Community of Learners in which teachers work together with formal education experts and informal education experts. The topics they will work on are derived from cutting edge research taking place at the partners university. Researchers and people from industry will complement the Community of Learners. The Community of Learners will develop material to be used both in the classroom as well as in the science centres. During the first part content knowledge about the research will be introduced using the well established IBSE methodology. In the second part students will discuss and work on Responsible Research and Innovation issues regarding the research they have studied. Each partner will develop one module to be used in the classroom During the module students will be developing exhibits about the RRI issues that they have studied. These exhibits will be presented in the science centres.The best exhibits from each partner will be brought together during the yearly conferences of the project. By using new techniques like digital fabrication (ie. 3D printing) the exchange of exhibits will be easy between partners. In the second round of the project the teachers from the first Community of Learners will work in a new Community with 4 to 5 new teachers. They will help these teachers introduce the developed modules in their own classroom. This way the number of teachers involved grows. After receiving feedback from the first two rounds the 10 modules will be published and disseminated using www.scientix.eu and through workshops at local and (inter)national conferences


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 18.74M | Year: 2009

The Project promotes the access to five European Research Infrastructures, and it is structured intop eight Networking Activities, plus the Management of the Consortium, and fourteen Joint Research Activities. The Project represents the continuation of the successful HadronPhysics project in FP6 and originates from the initiative of more than 2.500 European scientists working in the field of hadron physics. Hadron physics deals with the study of strongly interacting particles, the hadrons. Hadrons are composed of quarks and gluons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromo Dynamics, the theory of the strong force. Hadrons form more complex systems, in particular atomic. Under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, hadrons may loose their identity and dissolve into a new state of matter similar to the primordial matter of the early Universe. The Networking Activities are related to the organization of experimental and theoretical collaborative work concerning both ongoing activities at present Research Infrastructures and planned experiments at future facilities. In hadron physics the close interaction between experimentalists and theoreticians is of paramount importance. The Joint Research Activities concentrate on technological innovations for present and future experiments. Applications in material science, medicine, information, technology, etc., represent natural fall-outs. The main objective of this Integrating Activity is to optimize the use and development of the Research Infrastructures existing in Europe working in the field of hadron physics. The Project aims as well at structuring, on European scale, the way Research Infrastructures operate, and at fostering their joint development in terms of capacity and performance. The approach used is the bottom up approach, to respond to the needs of the scientific community in all fields of science and technology.


News Article | April 20, 2016
Site: phys.org

"We found a new way to see a difference between the quantum universe and a classical one, using nothing more complex than a compression program," says Dagomir Kaszlikowski, a Principal Investigator at the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore. Kaszlikowski worked with other researchers from CQT and collaborators at the Jagiellonian University and Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland to show that compression software, applied to experimental data, can reveal when a system crosses the boundary of our classical picture of the Universe into the quantum realm. The work is published in the March issue of New Journal of Physics. In particular, the technique detects evidence of quantum entanglement between two particles. Entangled particles coordinate their behaviour in ways that cannot be explained by signals sent between them or properties decided in advance. This phenomenon has shown up in many experiments already, but the new approach does without an assumption that is usually made in the measurements. "It may sound trivial to weaken an assumption, but this one is at the core of how we think about quantum physics," says co-author Christian Kurtsiefer at CQT. The relaxed assumption is that particles measured in an experiment are independent and identically distributed - or i.i.d. Experiments are typically performed on pairs of entangled particles, such as pairs of photons. Measure one of the light particles and you get results that seems random. The photon may have a 50:50 chance of having a polarization that points up or down, for example. The entanglement shows up when you measure the other photon of the pair: you'll get a matching result. A mathematical relation known as Bell's theorem shows that quantum physics allows matching results with greater probability than is possible with classical physics. This is what previous experiments have tested. But the theorem is derived for just one pair of particles, whereas scientists must work out the probabilities statistically, by measuring many pairs. The situations are equivalent only as long as each particle-pair is identical and independent of every other one - the i.i.d. assumption. With the new technique, the measurements are carried out the same way but the results are analyzed differently. Instead of converting the results into probabilities, the raw data (in the forms of lists of 1s and 0s) is used directly as input into compression software. Compression algorithms work by identifying patterns in the data and encoding them in a more efficient way. When applied to data from the experiment, they effectively detect the correlations resulting from quantum entanglement. In the theoretical part of the work, Kaszlikowski and his collaborators worked out a relation akin to Bell's theorem that's based on the 'normalized compression difference' between subsets of the data. If the universe is classical, this quantity must stay less than zero. Quantum physics, they predicted, would allow it to reach 0.24. The theorists teamed up with Kurtsiefer's experimental group to test the idea. First the team collected data from measurements on thousands of entangled photons. Then they used an open-source compression algorithm known as the Lempel-Ziv-Markov chain algorithm (used in the popular 7-zip archiver) to calculate the normalized compression differences. They find a value exceeding zero - 0.0494 ± 0.0076 - proving their system had crossed the classical-quantum boundary. The value is less than the maximum predicted because the compression does not reach the theoretical limit and the quantum states cannot be generated and detected perfectly. It's not yet clear whether the new technique will find practical applications, but the researchers see their 'algorithmic' approach to the problem fitting into a bigger picture of how to think about physics. They derived their relation by considering correlations between particles produced by an algorithm fed to two computing machines. "There is a trend to look at physical systems and processes as programs run on a computer made of the constituents of our universe," write the authors. This work presents an "explicit, experimentally testable example". Explore further: Quantum physics mimics spooky action into the past More information: Hou Shun Poh et al, Probing the quantum–classical boundary with compression software, New Journal of Physics (2016). DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/18/3/035011


Presentations Highlight Potential for CGuard™ to Improve Management of Carotid Artery Disease and Prevent Stroke BOSTON, MA--(Marketwired - Oct 27, 2016) - InspireMD, Inc. ( : NSPR) ( : NSPR.WS) ("InspireMD" or the "Company"), a leader in embolic prevention systems (EPS), neurovascular devices and thrombus management technologies, today announced that 12-month follow up data from PARADIGM-101, an investigator led clinical trial evaluating the Company's CGuard™ Embolic Prevention System (EPS), will be discussed in two presentations at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2016 scientific symposium, taking place October 29 - November 2 in Washington, D.C. at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. PARADIGM-101 is a clinical study evaluating the use of CGuard™ EPS in 101 consecutive patients with carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The study included patients with symptoms of CAS as well as asymptomatic patients who had an increased risk of stroke. Prof. Piotr Musialek, MD, DPhil, FESC, from the Jagiellonian University Department of Cardiac & Vascular Diseases in Krakow, Poland, will deliver an oral presentation titled "Twelve-month Safety and Efficacy of CGuard™ Micronet-Covered Embolic Prevention Stent System Routine Use to Perform Carotid Revascularization in Symptomatic and Increased-Stroke-Risk Asymptomatic Patients: The Carotid Revascularization PARADIGM All-Comer Prospective Academic Study". Adam Mazurek, MD, also from the Jagiellonian University Department of Cardiac & Vascular Diseases John Paul II Hospital will present additional analysis of PARADIGM-101 data in a poster titled "Highly Calcific Carotid Lesions Endovascular Revascularizaton Using a Novel Dual-layer Carotid Stent System CGuard™: Analysis from the PARADIGM Study" (Abstract #796). Presentation Date/Location/Time: Saturday, October 29, in Hall B, Lower Level of the convention center from 6:00-8:00pm ET About PARADIGM PARADIGM is an investigator-initiated Prospective evaluation of All-comer peRcutaneous cArotiD revascularization In symptomatic and increased-risk asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, using CGuard™ Mesh-covered embolic prevention stent system. Dr. Musialek previously presented data from the PARADIGM study, which comprised 71 CGuard™ EPS procedures in unselected all-comer patients, at EuroPCR 2015. These data showed a 100% success rate for the CGuard System and the placement procedure. Additionally, there were no procedure-related complications during CGuard placement or at 30 days post procedure. Similarly, there were or major adverse cardiac or neurological events, as determined by operator-independent neurologist and non-invasive cardiologist evaluation, during CGuard placement or at the 30-day time point. About CGuard™ EPS The CGuard™ EPS is designed to prevent peri-procedural and late embolization by trapping potential emboli against the arterial wall while maintaining excellent perfusion to the external carotid artery and branch vessels. MicroNet™ is a bio-stable mesh woven from a single strand of 20 micron Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET). CGuard™ EPS is CE Marked and not approved for sale in the U.S. by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at this time. Carotid stenosis is a narrowing of the carotid arteries, the major arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the brain. This narrowing results from a buildup of plaque inside the blood vessel and reduces blood flow to the brain. The presence of plaque in the blood vessel can also cause the development of blood clots, which may also reduce blood flow to the brain. In some cases, plaque may rupture or dislodge from the vessel wall and block smaller downstream arteries. Patients with carotid stenosis have an increased risk of stroke as a result of cerebral embolism and decreased blood flow to the brain. Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis are typically treated by placement of a stent inside the blood vessel in order to re-open the carotid artery and improve blood flow to the brain. InspireMD's CGuard™ EPS uses the company's patented MicroNet™ technology to provide the revascularization benefits of a stent with a mesh "safety net" that secures the plaque against the blood vessel's arterial wall and thereby prevents plaque and other debris from flowing through the stent's scaffold. About InspireMD, Inc. InspireMD seeks to utilize its proprietary MicroNet™ technology to make its products the industry standard for embolic protection and to provide a superior solution to the key clinical issues of current stenting in patients with a high risk of distal embolization, no reflow and major adverse cardiac events. InspireMD intends to pursue applications of this MicroNet technology in coronary, carotid (CGuard™), neurovascular, and peripheral artery procedures. InspireMD's common stock is quoted on the NYSE MKT under the ticker symbol NSPR and certain warrants are quoted on the NYSE MKT under the ticker symbol NSPR.WS. Forward-looking Statements This press release contains "forward-looking statements." Such statements may be preceded by the words "intends," "may," "will," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "projects," "predicts," "estimates," "aims," "believes," "hopes," "potential" or similar words. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, are based on certain assumptions and are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company's control, and cannot be predicted or quantified and consequently, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, risks and uncertainties associated with (i) market acceptance of our existing and new products, (ii) negative clinical trial results or lengthy product delays in key markets, (iii) an inability to secure regulatory approvals for the sale of our products, (iv) intense competition in the medical device industry from much larger, multinational companies, (v) product liability claims, (vi) product malfunctions, (vii) our limited manufacturing capabilities and reliance on subcontractors for assistance, (viii) insufficient or inadequate reimbursement by governmental and other third party payers for our products, (ix) our efforts to successfully obtain and maintain intellectual property protection covering our products, which may not be successful, (x) legislative or regulatory reform of the healthcare system in both the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, (xi) our reliance on single suppliers for certain product components, (xii) the fact that we will need to raise additional capital to meet our business requirements in the future and that such capital raising may be costly, dilutive or difficult to obtain and (xiii) the fact that we conduct business in multiple foreign jurisdictions, exposing us to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, logistical and communications challenges, burdens and costs of compliance with foreign laws and political and economic instability in each jurisdiction. More detailed information about the Company and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward looking statements is set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K and its Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Investors and security holders are urged to read these documents free of charge on the SEC's web site at http://www.sec.gov. The Company assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


BOSTON, MA--(Marketwired - Nov 1, 2016) - InspireMD, Inc. ( : NSPR) ( : NSPR.WS) ("InspireMD" or the "Company"), a leader in embolic prevention systems (EPS), neurovascular devices and thrombus management technologies, today announced 12-month follow up data from PARADIGM-101 of the CGuard™ Embolic Prevention System (EPS) which were presented in two presentations at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2016 scientific symposium, taking place October 29 - November 2 in Washington, D.C. at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. In an oral presentation today in the Featured Clinical Research Session titled "Twelve-month Safety and Efficacy of CGuard™ Micronet-Covered Embolic Prevention Stent System: Routine Use to Perform Carotid Revascularization in Symptomatic and Increased Stroke Risk Asymptomatic Patients: The PARADIGM All-Comer Prospective Academic Study," Prof. Piotr Musialek, MD, DPhil, FESC, from the Jagiellonian University Department of Cardiac & Vascular Diseases, in Krakow, Poland, reported 12-month follow up data from PARADIGM-101. PARADIGM-101 is an investigator-led clinical study evaluating the use of CGuard™ EPS in 101 consecutive patients with carotid artery stenosis. Key findings from the presentation included: "These data further reinforce the strong safety and efficacy profiles reported in previous trials of the CGuard™ EPS, and validate the system as an important option for endovascular management of patients with carotid artery disease," said Prof. Musialek. "Importantly, the very low incidence of peri- or post-procedural complications and stroke create a positive risk-benefit profile for CGuard™ EPS in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. These patients are frequently denied intervention due to fear of the complications associated with conventional intervention, and are left with a substantial risk of stroke when treated only with medication. Our study found that CGuard™ EPS is applicable in up to 90% of all-comer patients with carotid stenosis. These data indicate that CGuard™ EPS may fundamentally alter the paradigm for managing patients with carotid artery disease, whether they have symptoms or not." In addition, a poster titled "Highly Calcific Carotid Lesions Endovascular Revascularizaton Using a Novel Dual-layer Carotid Stent System CGuard™: Analysis from the PARADIGM Study," was presented by Adam Mazurek, MD, also from the Jagiellonian University Department of Cardiac & Vascular Diseases. Dr. Mazurek's study described the use of CGuard™ EPS to treat highly calcific carotid stenosis. Because patients with highly calcified carotid lesions are typically contraindicated for endovascular intervention due to suboptimal procedural outcomes with conventional stents, CGuard provides an important new treatment solution. "Highly calcified lesions are particularly difficult to manage with conventional endovascular intervention due to the difficulty in achieving optimal procedure results on one hand, and the risk of carotid artery rupture or perforation on the other. Patients with these lesions remain at risk of stroke, and they require a safe treatment," said Dr. Mazurek. "The results of this study show that the design and mechanical properties of CGuard™ EPS enable safe and effective endovascular management and revascularization of highly calcified lesions. I believe CGuard™ EPS has significant potential as a new approach to managing these difficult lesions and reducing the risk of stroke in patients with highly calcified lesions. Additional studies of CGuard EPS™ in this patient population should further validate common use of this innovative embolic prevention stent system to improve the treatment and outcomes of carotid artery disease." The data presented at TCT add to a growing body of clinical evidence validating the use of the CGuard as a proven treatment for both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with carotid artery disease. PARADIGM is an investigator-initiated Prospective evaluation of All-comer peRcutaneous cArotiD revascularization In symptomatic and increased-risk asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, using CGuard™ Mesh-covered embolic prevention stent system. Dr. Musialek previously presented data from the first cohort in the PARADIGM study, which comprised 71 CGuard™ EPS procedures in unselected all-comer patients, at EuroPCR 2015. The early outcome data in the target cohort of 101 patients were presented as a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at EuroPCR 2016 and were simultaneously published in EuroIntervention. These data showed a 100% success rate for the CGuard Embolic Prevention System during the placement procedure. Importantly, there were no procedure-related complications during CGuard™ EPS placement and at 30 days post procedure. Similarly, there were no major adverse cardiac or neurological events, as determined by operator-independent neurologist and non-invasive cardiologist evaluation. The new data presented at TCT are important because they confirm safety and durability of the CGuard™ EPS innovative treatment over 12 months. The CGuard™ EPS is designed to prevent peri-procedural and late embolization by trapping potential emboli against the arterial wall while maintaining excellent perfusion to the external carotid artery. MicroNet™ is a bio-stable mesh woven from a single strand of 20 micron Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET). CGuard™ EPS is CE Marked and not approved for sale in the U.S. by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at this time. Carotid stenosis is a narrowing of the carotid arteries, the major arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the brain. This narrowing results from a buildup of plaque inside the blood vessel and reduces blood flow to the brain. The presence of plaque in the blood vessel can also cause the development of blood clots, which may also reduce blood flow to the brain. In some cases, plaque may rupture or dislodge from the vessel wall and block smaller downstream arteries. Patients with carotid stenosis have an increased risk of stroke as a result of cerebral embolism and decreased blood flow to the brain. Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis are typically treated by placement of a stent inside the blood vessel in order to re-open the carotid artery and improve blood flow to the brain. InspireMD's CGuard™ EPS uses the company's patented MicroNet™ technology to provide the revascularization benefits of a stent with a mesh "safety net" that secures the plaque against the blood vessel's arterial wall and thereby prevents plaque and other debris from flowing through the stent's scaffold. InspireMD seeks to utilize its proprietary MicroNet™ technology to make its products the industry standard for embolic protection and to provide a superior solution to the key clinical issues of current stenting in patients with a high risk of distal embolization, no reflow and major adverse cardiac events. InspireMD intends to pursue applications of this MicroNet technology in coronary, carotid (CGuard™), neurovascular, and peripheral artery procedures. InspireMD's common stock is quoted on the NYSE MKT under the ticker symbol NSPR and certain warrants are quoted on the NYSE MKT under the ticker symbol NSPR.WS. This press release contains "forward-looking statements." Such statements may be preceded by the words "intends," "may," "will," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "projects," "predicts," "estimates," "aims," "believes," "hopes," "potential" or similar words. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, are based on certain assumptions and are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company's control, and cannot be predicted or quantified and consequently, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, risks and uncertainties associated with (i) market acceptance of our existing and new products, (ii) negative clinical trial results or lengthy product delays in key markets, (iii) an inability to secure regulatory approvals for the sale of our products, (iv) intense competition in the medical device industry from much larger, multinational companies, (v) product liability claims, (vi) product malfunctions, (vii) our limited manufacturing capabilities and reliance on subcontractors for assistance, (viii) insufficient or inadequate reimbursement by governmental and other third party payers for our products, (ix) our efforts to successfully obtain and maintain intellectual property protection covering our products, which may not be successful, (x) legislative or regulatory reform of the healthcare system in both the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, (xi) our reliance on single suppliers for certain product components, (xii) the fact that we will need to raise additional capital to meet our business requirements in the future and that such capital raising may be costly, dilutive or difficult to obtain and (xiii) the fact that we conduct business in multiple foreign jurisdictions, exposing us to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, logistical and communications challenges, burdens and costs of compliance with foreign laws and political and economic instability in each jurisdiction. More detailed information about the Company and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward looking statements is set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K and its Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Investors and security holders are urged to read these documents free of charge on the SEC's web site at http://www.sec.gov. The Company assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


BOSTON, MA--(Marketwired - Nov 14, 2016) - InspireMD, Inc. ( : NSPR) ("InspireMD" or the "Company"), a leader in embolic prevention systems (EPS), neurovascular devices and thrombus management technologies, today announced that it has received regulatory approval to commercialize the CGuard™ Embolic Prevention System for the treatment of carotid artery disease in Russia. The approval was granted by Russia's Federal Service for Surveillance in Healthcare (Roszdravnadzor). According to a presentation titled "Carotid Stenting and Surgery in 2016 in Russia" at Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, the Management Board Report of Russian Society of Angiology and Vascular Surgeons reported that Russia, among all European countries, has the highest rate of mortality from cerebrovascular disease. The presentation[i] concluded that carotid stenting in Russia has been increased among carotid reconstructions. "The approval of CGuard™ in Russia is another important commercial milestone for the Company's continued growth," said James Barry, PhD, Chief Executive Officer of InspireMD. "With this approval coming on the heels of our positive 12-month follow up data from PARADIGM-101, we are pleased to bring this technology to another important market in the global marketplace." As previously announced, Prof. Piotr Musialek, MD, DPhil, FESC, from the Jagiellonian University Department of Cardiac & Vascular Diseases, in Krakow, Poland, reported 12-month follow up data from PARADIGM-101 at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics 2016 scientific symposium. PARADIGM-101 is an investigator-led clinical study evaluating the use of CGuard™ EPS in 101 consecutive patients with carotid artery stenosis. A link to the data results and presentation can be accessed: http://www.inspiremd.com/en/wp-content/uploads/TCT_16.-PARADIGM-12M_-Piotr-Musialek.pdf PARADIGM is an investigator-initiated Prospective evaluation of All-comer peRcutaneous cArotiD revascularization In symptomatic and increased-risk asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, using CGuard™ Mesh-covered embolic prevention stent system. Dr. Musialek previously presented data from the first cohort in the PARADIGM study, which comprised 71 CGuard™ EPS procedures in unselected all-comer patients, at EuroPCR 2015. The early outcome data in the target cohort of 101 patients were presented as a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at EuroPCR 2016 and were simultaneously published in EuroIntervention. These data showed a 100% success rate for the CGuard Embolic Prevention System during the placement procedure. Importantly, there were no procedure-related complications during CGuard™ EPS placement and at 30 days post procedure. Similarly, there were no major adverse cardiac or neurological events, as determined by operator-independent neurologist and non-invasive cardiologist evaluation. The new data presented at TCT are important because they confirm safety and durability of the CGuard™ EPS innovative treatment over 12 months. The CGuard™ EPS is designed to prevent peri-procedural and late embolization by trapping potential emboli against the arterial wall while maintaining excellent perfusion to the external carotid artery. MicroNet™ is a bio-stable mesh woven from a single strand of 20 micron Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET). CGuard™ EPS is CE Marked and not approved for sale in the U.S. by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at this time. Carotid stenosis is a narrowing of the carotid arteries, the major arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the brain. This narrowing results from a buildup of plaque inside the blood vessel and reduces blood flow to the brain. The presence of plaque in the blood vessel can also cause the development of blood clots, which may also reduce blood flow to the brain. In some cases, plaque may rupture or dislodge from the vessel wall and block smaller downstream arteries. Patients with carotid stenosis have an increased risk of stroke as a result of cerebral embolism and decreased blood flow to the brain. Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis are typically treated by placement of a stent inside the blood vessel in order to re-open the carotid artery and improve blood flow to the brain. InspireMD's CGuard™ EPS uses the company's patented MicroNet™ technology to provide the revascularization benefits of a stent with a mesh "safety net" that secures the plaque against the blood vessel's arterial wall and thereby prevents plaque and other debris from flowing through the stent's scaffold. InspireMD seeks to utilize its proprietary MicroNet™ technology to make its products the industry standard for embolic protection and to provide a superior solution to the key clinical issues of current stenting in patients with a high risk of distal embolization, no reflow and major adverse cardiac events. InspireMD intends to pursue applications of this MicroNet technology in coronary, carotid (CGuard™), neurovascular, and peripheral artery procedures. InspireMD's common stock is quoted on the NYSE MKT under the ticker symbol NSPR and certain warrants are quoted on the NYSE MKT under the ticker symbol NSPR.WS. This press release contains "forward-looking statements." Such statements may be preceded by the words "intends," "may," "will," "plans," "expects," "anticipates," "projects," "predicts," "estimates," "aims," "believes," "hopes," "potential" or similar words. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, are based on certain assumptions and are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company's control, and cannot be predicted or quantified and consequently, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, risks and uncertainties associated with (i) market acceptance of our existing and new products, (ii) negative clinical trial results or lengthy product delays in key markets, (iii) an inability to secure regulatory approvals for the sale of our products, (iv) intense competition in the medical device industry from much larger, multinational companies, (v) product liability claims, (vi) product malfunctions, (vii) our limited manufacturing capabilities and reliance on subcontractors for assistance, (viii) insufficient or inadequate reimbursement by governmental and other third party payers for our products, (ix) our efforts to successfully obtain and maintain intellectual property protection covering our products, which may not be successful, (x) legislative or regulatory reform of the healthcare system in both the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, (xi) our reliance on single suppliers for certain product components, (xii) the fact that we will need to raise additional capital to meet our business requirements in the future and that such capital raising may be costly, dilutive or difficult to obtain and (xiii) the fact that we conduct business in multiple foreign jurisdictions, exposing us to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, logistical and communications challenges, burdens and costs of compliance with foreign laws and political and economic instability in each jurisdiction. More detailed information about the Company and the risk factors that may affect the realization of forward looking statements is set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K and its Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Investors and security holders are urged to read these documents free of charge on the SEC's web site at http://www.sec.gov.The Company assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. [i] Starodubtsev V, Karpenko A, Ignatenko P. Carotid stenting and surgery in 2016 in Russia. Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology. 2016. http://acst-2.org/onewebmedia/10.Starodubtsev.pdf. Accessed November, 13, 2016.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-06-2014 | Award Amount: 3.38M | Year: 2015

Despite the fact that iodine deficiency (ID) can easily be prevented by iodine fortification of table salt, industrial salt and cattle food, Europe belongs to the worst regions in terms of access to iodized salt and is seriously ID, resulting in the perpetuation of the single most important, preventable cause of brain damage. European ID is due to significant heterogeneity in prevention and monitoring programs, leading to inappropriate interventions, increased disease burden, health inequities and increased health care costs. Up to 360 Million European citizens are exposed to ID disorders. An effective European monitoring program is a crucial step towards eradication of ID disorders with significant benefits for European citizens and the sustainability of health care systems. The effects of ID in total cause tremendous, preventable costs in health care systems of affected regions. The overall aim of EUthyroid is to evaluate ID prevention and monitoring programs in 24 European countries, to initiate capacity building for harmonized European ID prevention and monitoring programs, and to disseminate project outcomes for supporting measures on national and EU level in order to eradicate ID disorders in Europe. The project will position itself as international hub of current national initiatives in the attempt to coordinate and support existing national activities. EUthyroid will generate the first harmonized data set of ID resulting in the first valid map of iodine status in Europe. With a dedicated dissemination program about the unfavorable health outcomes of ID, EUthyroid will pave the way for a harmonized EU-wide regulation of iodination, a common approach to iodine and outcome monitoring and establish recommendations for scientists on how to monitor IDD prevention programs. The project aims to make Europe a benchmark for ID disorder prevention worldwide.


Home > Press > Zip software can detect the quantum-classical boundary: Compression of experimental data reveals the presence of quantum correlations Abstract: Quantum physics has a reputation for being mysterious and mathematically challenging. That makes it all the more surprising that a new technique to detect quantum behaviour relies on a familiar tool: a "zip" program you might have installed on your computer. "We found a new way to see a difference between the quantum universe and a classical one, using nothing more complex than a compression program," says Dagomir Kaszlikowski, a Principal Investigator at the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore. Kaszlikowski worked with other researchers from CQT and collaborators at the Jagiellonian University and Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland to show that compression software, applied to experimental data, can reveal when a system crosses the boundary of our classical picture of the Universe into the quantum realm. The work is published in the March issue of New Journal of Physics. In particular, the technique detects evidence of quantum entanglement between two particles. Entangled particles coordinate their behaviour in ways that cannot be explained by signals sent between them or properties decided in advance. This phenomenon has shown up in many experiments already, but the new approach does without an assumption that is usually made in the measurements. "It may sound trivial to weaken an assumption, but this one is at the core of how we think about quantum physics," says co-author Christian Kurtsiefer at CQT. The relaxed assumption is that particles measured in an experiment are independent and identically distributed - or i.i.d. Experiments are typically performed on pairs of entangled particles, such as pairs of photons. Measure one of the light particles and you get results that seems random. The photon may have a 50:50 chance of having a polarization that points up or down, for example. The entanglement shows up when you measure the other photon of the pair: you'll get a matching result. A mathematical relation known as Bell's theorem shows that quantum physics allows matching results with greater probability than is possible with classical physics. This is what previous experiments have tested. But the theorem is derived for just one pair of particles, whereas scientists must work out the probabilities statistically, by measuring many pairs. The situations are equivalent only as long as each particle-pair is identical and independent of every other one - the i.i.d. assumption. With the new technique, the measurements are carried out the same way but the results are analyzed differently. Instead of converting the results into probabilities, the raw data (in the forms of lists of 1s and 0s) is used directly as input into compression software. Compression algorithms work by identifying patterns in the data and encoding them in a more efficient way. When applied to data from the experiment, they effectively detect the correlations resulting from quantum entanglement. In the theoretical part of the work, Kaszlikowski and his collaborators worked out a relation akin to Bell's theorem that's based on the 'normalized compression difference' between subsets of the data. If the universe is classical, this quantity must stay less than zero. Quantum physics, they predicted, would allow it to reach 0.24. The theorists teamed up with Kurtsiefer's experimental group to test the idea. First the team collected data from measurements on thousands of entangled photons. Then they used an open-source compression algorithm known as the Lempel-Ziv-Markov chain algorithm (used in the popular 7-zip archiver) to calculate the normalized compression differences. They find a value exceeding zero - 0.0494 ± 0.0076 - proving their system had crossed the classical-quantum boundary. The value is less than the maximum predicted because the compression does not reach the theoretical limit and the quantum states cannot be generated and detected perfectly. It's not yet clear whether the new technique will find practical applications, but the researchers see their 'algorithmic' approach to the problem fitting into a bigger picture of how to think about physics. They derived their relation by considering correlations between particles produced by an algorithm fed to two computing machines. "There is a trend to look at physical systems and processes as programs run on a computer made of the constituents of our universe," write the authors. This work presents an "explicit, experimentally testable example". For more information, please click Contacts: Evon Tan Dagomir Kaszlikowski Principal Investigator and Associate Professor, Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore Phone: +65 6516 5622 Christian Kurtsiefer Principal Investigator and Professor, Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore Phone: +65 6516 1250 If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


Giataganas D.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Soltanpanahi H.,Jagiellonian University | Soltanpanahi H.,University of Witwatersrand
Journal of High Energy Physics | Year: 2014

We study the Langevin diffusion of a relativistic heavy quark in anisotropic strongly coupled theories in the local limit. Firstly, we use the axion space-dependent deformed anisotropic ℕ = 4 sYM, where the geometry anisotropy is always prolate, while the pressure anisotropy may be prolate or oblate. For motion along the anisotropic direction we find that the effective temperature for the quark can be larger than the heat bath temperature, in contrast to what happens in the isotropic theory. The longitudinal and transverse Langevin diffusion coefficients depend strongly on the anisotropy, the direction of motion and the transverse direction considered. We analyze the anisotropy effects to the coefficients and compare them to each other and to them of the isotropic theory. To examine the dependence of the coefficients on the type of the geometry, we consider another bottom-up anisotropic model. Changing the geometry from prolate to oblate, certain diffusion coefficients interchange their behaviors. In both anisotropic backgrounds we find cases that the transverse diffusion coefficient is larger than the longitudinal, but we find no negative excess noise. © 2014 The Author(s).


McLerran L.,Brookhaven National Laboratory | McLerran L.,Central China Normal University | Praszalowicz M.,Jagiellonian University | Schenke B.,Brookhaven National Laboratory
Nuclear Physics A | Year: 2013

The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has recently presented data on the average transverse momentum of protons, kaons and pions as a function of particle multiplicity. We relate the particle multiplicity to saturation momentum using recently published computations of the interaction radius determined from the theory of the Color Glass Condensate. We show that the pp and the pA experimental data scale in terms of these saturation momenta. Computing transverse momentum spectra for identified particles using Boltzmann-type distributions and relating different associated multiplicities using geometric scaling, these simple distributions reproduce the observed dependence of the mean transverse momentum on particle multiplicities seen in both pp and pA interactions for pions to good accuracy, and to fair agreement for protons and kaons. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Romanczukiewicz T.,Jagiellonian University | Shnir Y.,Durham University | Shnir Y.,Belarusian National Technical University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

We present a numerical study of the process of production of kink-antikink pairs in the collision of particlelike states in the one-dimensional 1/4 model. It is shown that there are 3 steps in the process: The first step is to excite the oscillon intermediate state in the particle collision, the second step is a resonance excitation of the oscillon by the incoming perturbations, and, finally, the soliton-antisoliton pair can be created from the resonantly excited oscillon. It is shown that the process depends fractally on the amplitude of the perturbations and the number of perturbations. We also present the effective collective coordinate model for this process.


Cailleteau T.,CNRS Laboratory of Subatomic Physics & Cosmology | Mielczarek J.,Jagiellonian University | Mielczarek J.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Barrau A.,CNRS Laboratory of Subatomic Physics & Cosmology | Grain J.,University Paris - Sud
Classical and Quantum Gravity | Year: 2012

Holonomy corrections to scalar perturbations are investigated in the loop quantum cosmology framework.Due to the effective approach, modifications of the algebra of constraints generically lead to anomalies. In order to remove those anomalies, counter terms are introduced. We find a way to explicitly fulfill the conditions for anomaly freedom and we give explicit expressions for the counter terms. Surprisingly, the √μ-scheme naturally arises in this procedure. The gaugeinvariant variables are found and equations of motion for the anomaly-free scalar perturbations are derived. Finally, some cosmological consequences are discussed qualitatively. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Plachno B.J.,Jagiellonian University | Swiatek P.,University of Silesia
Protoplasma | Year: 2010

In most species of the Genlisea-Utricularia sister lineage, the organs arising directly after germination comprise a single leaf-like structure, followed by a bladder-trap/stolon, with the lack of an embryonic primary root considered a synapomorphic character. Previous anatomical work suggests that the most common recent ancestor of Utricularia possessed an embryo comprising storage tissue and a meristematic apical region minus lateral organs. Studies of embryogenesis across the Utricularia lineage suggest that multiple primary organs have only evolved in the viviparous Utricularia nelumbifolia, Utricularia reniformis, and Utricularia humboldtii within the derived Iperua/Orchidioides clade. All three of these species are specialized for growth as "aquatic epiphytes" in the tanks of bromeliads, with recent phylogenetic evidence suggesting the possibility that multiple primary organs may have evolved twice independently within this clade. The primary organs of viviparous Utricularia also possess epidermal surface glands, and our study suggests that these may function as root hairs for uptake of solutes from the external environment-a possible adaptation for the "aquatic-epiphytic" habitat. © Springer-Verlag 2009.


Gaweda L.,Medical University of Warsaw | Prochwicz K.,Jagiellonian University | Cella M.,King's College London
Psychiatry Research | Year: 2015

Psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) are frequently reported in the general population. Healthy individuals reporting PLEs have a similar personality profile to people with psychosis; however, the mechanisms by which personality influences PLEs are unclear. This study tests the hypothesis that cognitive biases mediate the relationship between two dimensions of personality (i.e. temperament and character) and positive and negative PLEs. Two hundred and ninety-six healthy participants were assessed using the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences scale, the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Davos Scale for Cognitive Biases. We performed multiple stepwise regression analysis and mediation analysis according to Baron and Kenny's method. Harm-avoidance and self-directedness personality dimensions significantly predicted PLEs frequency. High self-transcendence and lower cooperativeness predicted positive PLEs. Cognitive biases were significant mediators in relationships between temperament, character and both positive and negative PLEs. In particular, attention to threat and external attribution biases fully mediate the relationship between cooperativeness and positive PLEs. Other cognitive biases partially mediate the relationships between self-transcendence and positive PLEs and self-directedness, harm-avoidance and negative PLEs. Our study tentatively suggests that personality may influence PLEs via the cognitive bias pathway. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Krompiec S.,University of Silesia | Penkala M.,University of Silesia | Szczubialka K.,Jagiellonian University | Kowalska E.,University of Silesia
Coordination Chemistry Reviews | Year: 2012

A comprehensive review of the reports concerning the synthesis of symmetrical and, particularly, mixed acetals and orthoesters with transition metal compounds and complexes as catalysts is presented. The following methods for the synthesis of symmetric and mixed acetals are discussed: acetalization of aldehydes or ketones with alcohols or diols; transacetalization; synthesis from vinyl and allyl ethers; synthesis via intra- or intermolecular addition of OH group to a triple bond; oxidation of primary alcohols; tetrahydropyranylation of alcohols or phenols; synthesis from epoxides and aldehydes or ketones; formation of 1,3-dioxanes by Prins cyclization of olefins with paraformaldehyde; oxidative cyclization-carbonylation of ynones; acetalization of ene-diol under Wacker-type catalysis. Reviewed is also the synthesis of mixed orthoesters via addition of alcohols and phenols to acrolein acetals. Presented are methods of the isolation of pure products, recycling of the catalysts (if applicable) and the advantages of the metal complexes compared to classical catalysts, Brønsted acids in particular. The relationship between the structure and reactivity was analyzed and the mechanisms of the reactions of acetal formation catalyzed by transition metal compounds and complexes were discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Mielczarek J.,Jagiellonian University | Cailleteau T.,CNRS Laboratory of Subatomic Physics & Cosmology | Barrau A.,CNRS Laboratory of Subatomic Physics & Cosmology | Grain J.,University Paris - Sud
Classical and Quantum Gravity | Year: 2012

We investigate vector perturbations with holonomy corrections in the framework of loop quantum cosmology. Conditions to achieve anomaly freedom for these perturbations are found at all orders. This requires the introduction of counter-terms in the Hamiltonian constraint. We also show that anomaly freedom requires the diffeomorphism constraint to hold its classical form when scalar matter is added although the issue of a vector matter source, required for full consistency, remains to be investigated. The gauge-invariant variable and the corresponding equation of motion are derived. The propagation of vector modes through the bounce is finally discussed. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Bartus K.,Jagiellonian University | Han F.T.,University of California at San Francisco | Bednarek J.,Jagiellonian University | Myc J.,Jagiellonian University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2013

Objectives: The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy and safety of left atrial appendage (LAA) closure via a percutaneous LAA ligation approach. Background: Embolic stroke is the most devastating consequence of atrial fibrillation. Exclusion of the LAA is believed to decrease the risk of embolic stroke. Methods: Eighty-nine patients with atrial fibrillation were enrolled to undergo percutaneous ligation of the LAA with the LARIAT device. The catheter-based LARIAT device consists of a snare with a pre-tied suture that is guided epicardially over the LAA. LAA closure was confirmed with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and contrast fluoroscopy immediately, then with TEE at 1 day, 30 days, 90 days, and 1 year post-LAA ligation. Results: Eighty-five (96%) of 89 patients underwent successful LAA ligation. Eighty-one of 85 patients had complete closure immediately. Three of 85 patients had a ≤2-mm residual LAA leak by TEE color Doppler evaluation. One of 85 patients had a ≤3-mm jet by TEE. There were no complications due to the device. There were 3 access-related complications (during pericardial access, n = 2; and transseptal catheterization, n = 1). Adverse events included severe pericarditis post-operatively (n = 2), late pericardial effusion (n = 1), unexplained sudden death (n = 2), and late strokes thought to be non-embolic (n = 2). At 1 month (81 of 85) and 3 months (77 of 81) post-ligation, 95% of the patients had complete LAA closure by TEE. Of the patients undergoing 1-year TEE (n = 65), there was 98% complete LAA closure, including the patients with previous leaks. Conclusions: LAA closure with the LARIAT device can be performed effectively with acceptably low access complications and periprocedural adverse events in this observational study. © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation.


Strzalka W.,Jagiellonian University | Ziemienowicz A.,University of Lethbridge
Annals of Botany | Year: 2011

BackgroundPCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) has been found in the nuclei of yeast, plant and animal cells that undergo cell division, suggesting a function in cell cycle regulation and/or DNA replication. It subsequently became clear that PCNA also played a role in other processes involving the cell genome.ScopeThis review discusses eukaryotic PCNA, with an emphasis on plant PCNA, in terms of the protein structure and its biochemical properties as well as gene structure, organization, expression and function. PCNA exerts a tripartite function by operating as (1) a sliding clamp during DNA synthesis, (2) a polymerase switch factor and (3) a recruitment factor. Most of its functions are mediated by its interactions with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair and recombination as well as in regulation of the cell cycle and chromatid cohesion. Moreover, post-translational modifications of PCNA play a key role in regulation of its functions. Finally, a phylogenetic comparison of PCNA genes suggests that the multi-functionality observed in most species is a product of evolution.ConclusionsMost plant PCNAs exhibit features similar to those found for PCNAs of other eukaryotes. Similarities include: (1) a trimeric ring structure of the PCNA sliding clamp, (2) the involvement of PCNA in DNA replication and repair, (3) the ability to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase δ and (4) the ability to interact with p21, a regulator of the cell cycle. However, many plant genomes seem to contain the second, probably functional, copy of the PCNA gene, in contrast to PCNA pseudogenes that are found in mammalian genomes. © 2011 The Author.


Dorey P.,Durham University | Dorey P.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Mersh K.,Durham University | Romanczukiewicz T.,Jagiellonian University | Shnir Y.,Durham University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2011

We study kink-antikink collisions in the one-dimensional nonintegrable scalar 6 model. Although the single-kink solutions for this model do not possess an internal vibrational mode, our simulations reveal a resonant scattering structure, thereby providing a counterexample to the standard belief that the existence of such a mode is a necessary condition for multibounce resonances in general kink-antikink collisions. We investigate the two-bounce windows in detail, and present evidence that this structure is caused by the existence of bound states in the spectrum of small oscillations about a combined kink-antikink configuration. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Sulka G.D.,Jagiellonian University | Jozwik P.,Military University of Technology
Intermetallics | Year: 2011

The corrosion behavior of Ni3Al-based intermetallic alloys in a 0.5 M NaOH solution was studied at 25 °C. The open circuit potential, cathodic and anodic potentiodynamic polarization, Tafel plots and linear polarization resistance measurements were used to characterize the corrosion behavior. For the Ni3Al(B, Zr) alloy, potentiodynamic polarization curves showed a wide passive region that can be found between about -0.220 VSCE and 0.520 VSCE. On the other hand, a narrow passive region, in the range of potentials from about -0.180 VSCE to 0.180 VSCE, was observed for the Ni3Al(B, Zr, Cr, Mo) alloy. Chromium, as an alloying element in the Ni3Al(B, Zr, Cr, Mo) alloy, contributes to transpassive dissolution of the passive film at much lower anodic potentials and remarkably reduces the passivation region. The experiments indicated also that damaged passive films on alloys repairs itself and pits do not initiate. The surface of both alloys and passive films possess extremely high corrosion resistance in a studied solution. However, Tafel and linear polarization tests revealed that freshly exposed surfaces of the Ni 3Al(B, Zr) alloy exhibited better corrosion resistances than the Ni3Al(B, Zr, Cr, Mo) alloy. Both methods, used for the determination of corrosion rates gave very similar results. The calculated corrosion rates are about 2.8 ·10-3 and 6.0·10-3 mm year -1 for the Ni3Al(B, Zr) alloy and B, respectively. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Lee R.J.,University of California at San Francisco | Bartus K.,Jagiellonian University | Yakubov S.J.,Riverside Methodist Hospital
Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions | Year: 2010

Background-Surgical ligation of the left atrial appendage (LAA) has been shown to be an effective alternative to warfarin therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation. A novel catheter-based approach for LAA ligation was evaluated for safety and effectiveness in a canine model. Methods and Results-A total of 26 healthy mongrel dogs underwent ligation of the LAA through a catheter-based approach. Intracardiac echocardiography and contrast fluoroscopy were used to position a marker balloon at the origin of the LAA. An over-the-wire approach was used to guide the LARIAT snare device over the LAA to enable ligation of the LAA. Sixteen dogs were euthanized acutely. The LAA was examined to assess the placement and completeness of the ligation. The remaining 10 dogs were used for long-term follow-up. The snare delivery device was able to completely capture, advance, and close the anatomic base of the LAA in all cases. In all animals, complete LAA exclusion through this closed-chest approach was achieved without complications. Chronic follow-up revealed healthy active dogs. Examination of the LAA at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months demonstrated completely endothelialized orifice of the LAA. Conclusions-Using a closed-chest approach in the canine model, the catheter-based snare delivery device achieved safe and reliable ligation of the entire LAA. The clinical application of this novel approach may provide an alternative to warfarin or to permanent device implants in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation for the prevention of embolic events originating from the LAA. © 2010 American Heart Association, Inc.


McLerran L.,Brookhaven National Laboratory | McLerran L.,Central China Normal University | Praszalowicz M.,Jagiellonian University
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2015

We review the recent ALICE data on charged particle multiplicity in p-p collisions, and show that it exhibits Geometrical Scaling (GS) with energy dependence given with characteristic exponent λ=0.22. Next, starting from the GS hypothesis and using results of the Color Glass Condensate effective theory, we calculate〈pT〉 as a function Nch including dependence on the scattering energy W. We show that〈pT〉 both in p-p and p-Pb collisions scales in terms of scaling variable (W/W0)λ/(2+λ)Nch/S⊥ where S⊥ is multiplicity-dependent interaction area in the transverse plane. Furthermore, we discuss how the behavior of the interaction radius R at large multiplicities affects the mean pT dependence on Nch, and make a prediction that〈pT〉 at high multiplicity should reach an energy-independent limit. © 2014 The Authors.


Moskal P.,Jagiellonian University | Moskal P.,Jülich Research Center
Few-Body Systems | Year: 2014

During the last decade large samples of data have been collected on the production of the ground-state pseudoscalar mesons in collisions of proton or deuteron beam with hydrogen or deuterium target. These measurements have been performed in the vicinity of the kinematical threshold for meson production where only a few partial waves in both initial and final state are expected to contribute to the production process. This simplifies significantly the interpretation of the data, yet still appears to be challenging due to the three or four particle final state systems with a complex hadronic potential. We review experiments and phenomenology of the near threshold production of the ground-state mesons in the few-body final states as for example: nucleus-meson and nucleon-nucleon-meson, and report on the status of the search of the mesic-nuclei (a meson-nucleus bound states). Experimental advantages of measurements close to the kinematical threshold are discussed, and general features of the production mechanism of the η and η′ mesons in the nucleon-nucleon collisions are presented emphasising results of measurements of spin and isospin dependence of the production cross sections. © 2014 The Author(s).


Moskal P.,Jagiellonian University | Moskal P.,Jülich Research Center | Smyrski J.,Jagiellonian University
Acta Physica Polonica B | Year: 2010

We review status and perspectives of the search for the light η-mesic nuclei using COSY-11, WASA-at-COSY and COSY-TOF detector systems.


McLerran L.,Brookhaven National Laboratory | Praszalowicz M.,Jagiellonian University
Acta Physica Polonica B | Year: 2011

In the previous paper we have argued that the LHC data on multiplicity, average transverse momentum, and charged particle transverse momentum distributions are well described with minimal modeling in terms of a saturation scale Q sat(s). As a consequence, the p T spectra should exhibit geometric scaling. In this short note we show that recently released CMS data at √s = 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV fall on a universal curve when plotted in terms of suitably defined scaling variable τ.


Shishova K.V.,RAS Shemyakin Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry | Lavrentyeva E.A.,Moscow State University | Dobrucki J.W.,Jagiellonian University | Zatsepina O.V.,RAS Shemyakin Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry
Developmental Biology | Year: 2015

It is well known that fully-grown mammalian oocytes, rather than typical nucleoli, contain prominent but structurally homogenous bodies called "nucleolus-like bodies" (NLBs). NLBs accumulate a vast amount of material, but their biochemical composition and functions remain uncertain. To clarify the composition of the NLB material in mouse GV oocytes, we devised an assay to detect internal oocyte proteins with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and applied the fluorescent RNA-binding dye acridine orange to examine whether NLBs contain RNA. Our results unequivocally show that, similarly to typical nucleoli, proteins and RNA are major constituents of transcriptionally active (or non-surrounded) NLBs as well as of transcriptionally silent (or surrounded) NLBs. We also show, by exposing fixed oocytes to a mild proteinase K treatment, that the NLB mass in oocytes of both types contains nucleolar proteins that are involved in all major steps of ribosome biogenesis, including rDNA transcription (UBF), early rRNA processing (fibrillarin), and late rRNA processing (NPM1/nucleophosmin/B23, nucleolin/C23), but none of the nuclear proteins tested, including SC35, NOBOX, topoisomerase II beta, HP1α, and H3. The ribosomal RPL26 protein was detected within the NLBs of NSN-type oocytes but is virtually absent from NLBs of SN-type oocytes. Taking into account that the major class of nucleolar RNA is ribosomal RNA (rRNA), we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes targeting 18S and 28S rRNAs. The results show that, in contrast to active nucleoli, NLBs of fully-grown oocytes are impoverished for the rRNAs, which is consistent with the absence of transcribed ribosomal genes in the NLB mass. Overall, the results of this study suggest that NLBs of fully-grown mammalian oocytes serve for storing major nucleolar proteins but not rRNA. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Kistryn St.,Jagiellonian University | Stephan E.,University of Silesia
Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics | Year: 2013

Recently, the database for the breakup of a deuteron in collision with a proton has been significantly enriched in the domain of medium energies. High precision experimental data for the cross section, vector (proton)-analyzing power and vector- and tensor (deuteron)-analyzing powers were collected with detection systems covering a large part of the phase space of the 1H(, pp)n and 2H(, pp)n reactions. A series of experiments were carried out with deuteron beams with energies of 100, 130 and 160 MeV and proton beams with energies of 135 and 190 MeV, each of them providing a few hundred data points per observable, obtained on systematic grids of kinematical variables within the studied angular ranges. Usage of the multidetector systems with significant solid angle coverage provides not only very rich data sets but also a good opportunity for controlling the consistency of the results. The ways of exploiting all these advantages in high precision measurements are discussed. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions, in which the full dynamics of the three-nucleon (3N) system is obtained in different ways: realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials are combined with model 3N forces (3NF) or with an effective 3N interaction resulting from the explicit treatment of the Δ-isobar excitation. On top of the NN and 3N nuclear forces Coulomb interaction can be also included into the calculational framework. Relativistic calculations can be performed with realistic NN potentials alone. Alternatively, the chiral perturbation theory approach is used at the next-to-next-to-leading order with all relevant NN and 3N contributions taken into account, while at the next order without taking into account the corresponding 3NF contributions. Comparing the calculated observables with the experimental data shows the sensitivity of the cross sections to 3NFs and to Coulomb force effects, while there is no sensitivity of the deuteron vector analyzing powers to any additional dynamics beyond the NN forces. The behavior of the tensor analyzing powers and of the proton analyzing powers at higher energy is rather complicated, showing discrepancies between the calculations and the experimental data which must be considered as indications of deficiencies in the spin part of the assumed models of the 3N system dynamics. The richness of the database calls for a systematic survey of the results, therefore kinematical coordinates convenient for that purpose and certain methods of comparison to the theoretical calculations are discussed, together with signposts to future developments in the field of 3N system studies. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Mielczarek J.,Jagiellonian University | Cailleteau T.,CNRS Laboratory of Subatomic Physics & Cosmology | Grain J.,University Paris - Sud | Barrau A.,CNRS Laboratory of Subatomic Physics & Cosmology
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2010

Loop quantum cosmology provides an efficient framework to study the evolution of the Universe beyond the classical Big Bang paradigm. Because of holonomy corrections, the singularity is replaced by a "bounce." The dynamics of the background is investigated into the details, as a function of the parameters of the model. In particular, the conditions required for inflation to occur are carefully considered and are shown to be generically met. The propagation of gravitational waves is then investigated in this framework. By both numerical and analytical approaches, the primordial tensor power spectrum is computed for a wide range of parameters. Several interesting features could be observationally probed. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2007.8.1 | Award Amount: 1.04M | Year: 2008

In the semiconductor industry, CMOS technology will certainly continue to have a predominant market position in the future. However, there are still a number of technological challenges, which have to be tackled if CMOS downscaling should be pursued until feature sizes will reach 10 nm around the year 2015-2020.\nThe NanoICT Coordination Action activities will reinforce and support the whole European Research Community in ICT nanoscale devices covering the following research areas expected to demonstrate unconventional solutions beyond the expected limits of CMOS technology.\n Demonstration of new concepts for switches or memory cells\n Demonstration of new concepts, technologies and architectures for local and chip level interconnects with substantial improvements over current solutions\n Demonstration of radically new functionalities by the integration of blocks from a few nanometres down to the atomic scale into high added-value systems\nThe CA action plans will go beyond the organisation of conferences, workshops, exchange of personnel, WEB site, etc. developing the following activities:\n Consolidation and visibility of the research community in ICT nanoscale devices\n Mapping and benchmarking of research at European level, and its comparison with other continents\n Identification of drivers and measures to assess research in ICT nanoscale devices, and to assess the potential of results to be taken up in industrial research\n Coordination of research agendas and development of research roadmaps\n Coordination of national or regional research programmes or activities, with the aim to involve funding authorities in building the ERA around this topic\n Development of strategies for international cooperation on themes related to NanoICT\nExpected impact will be the enhanced visibility, shaping and consolidation of the NanoICT research community in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.41M | Year: 2013

CALIPSO is a genuine interdisciplinary and intersectorial research network composed of nine academic research institutions and three industrial partners, thus presenting an example of true translational research and training of young researchers in communicating and transferring achievements from different model organisms directly to industrial partners. CALIPSO aims at identifying environmentally triggered regulatory calcium signals and protein phosphorylation events that control photosynthesis and metabolism. CALIPSO partners work with a wide range of different organisms covering the full phylogenetic spectrum from algae to higher plants including economically important crops. They combine a wide spectrum of newest technologies in molecular biology, biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics, genetics, bioinformatics and systems biology to uncover how photosynthetic organisms acclimate to changing environmental conditions or stress. This novel combination of scientific expertise combined with industrial applications is one of the major strengths of CALIPSO, exposing the participating researchers to different schools of thought. The active participation of Bayer CropScience Gent and Ecoduna as full network partners, and Photon Systems Instruments as associated partner, will enable intersectorial industry-academia cooperation with the long term objectives of (i) improving yield and stress robustness of crops and (ii) developing microalgal-biotechnology. The integrated systematic training programme of CALIPSO will boost the future employability of the young researchers by acquisition of technical skills for their work in academia or the private sector and also essential complementary skills for their future career. The training programme comprises three workshops on state-of-the art techniques - and one on industrial-relevant skills. This is completed by secondments to partner laboratories and industry and network-wide training events in further complementary skills.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS.2011.2.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2012

The aim of this proposal is to support teachers in adopting inquiry based science education (IBSE) at second level (students aged 12-18 years) across Europe. This will be achieved by utilising existing resources and models for teacher education in IBSE both pre-service and in-service. In addition to SAILS partners adopting IBSE resources within their curricula and implementing teacher education in their countries, the SAILS proposal aims to develop appropriate strategies and frameworks for the assessment of IBSE skills and competences and prepare teachers not only to be able to teach through IBSE, but also to be confident and competent in the assessment of their students learning. Through this unified approach of implementing all the necessary components for transforming classroom practice, i.e. teacher education, curriculum and assessment around an IBSE pedagogy, a sustainable model for IBSE will be achieved. SAILS will provide teacher education workshops in IBSE across the twelve participating countries and promote a self-sustaining model encouraging teachers to share experiences and practice of inquiry approaches to teaching, learning and assessment by building a community of practice. The SAILS consortium of over 60 partners from 14 organisations, including universities, a small-medium enterprise and an international multinational organisation, will work together to promote and disseminate inquiry based approaches to science teaching, learning and assessment with national and international stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2008.3.1.2.1. | Award Amount: 3.14M | Year: 2009

The overall goal of UMBRELLA is to use microorganisms to develop cost-efficient and sustainable measures for soil remediation at heavy metal contaminated sites throughout Europe. This will be facilitated by research in microbiology, plant uptake and (hydro)geochemistry centers on the study of microbial influence on metal biogeochemical cycles and their impact for use in soil and water protection. The technologies developed provide a speed-up of existing bioremediation techniques and will provide a tool-box to end-users with microbes for remediation actions in different European climatic, geological and biological setting which will allow low-cost, sustainable, on-site bioremediation of metal contaminations. At the same time, the introduction of a concerted, internationalized education of interdisciplinary trained PhD students across Europe will ascertain a long-lasting, sustainable education profile with relevance to soil remediation. The involvement of government agencies is focussing on the possibility to provide governments with fused guidelines for soil and water protection in a way that overcomes the practises of separated agencies by focussing on ecotoxicological risks resulting from metal contamination on-site as well as by transport through water paths in ground water and international water ways. Dissemination of results will be ensured by international congresses and publications. The management of an integrative, multi-partner consortium ensures the applicability by combination of eight sites across Europe in one modeling approach which will cover Northern, Southern, Middle and Eastern European sites to guarantee future applicability across Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FCT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2015

The challenges of international police reform assistance are formidable. Conventional top-down institutional reform has proven neither effective nor sustainable. Community-based policing (COP) holds promise, however evaluations have pointed to a lack of in-depth understanding of police-community relations in police reform assistance. This project will conduct integrated social and technical research on COP in post-conflict countries in S.E. Europe, Asia, Africa and Central America. New knowledge, reflection on lessons learnt and best practices will support both national police and EU/International police reform assistance. The project will lead to a better understanding of police-community relations, and innovation in information and communication technology (ICT) for enhancing these relations in post-conflict countries undergoing serious security reform. Linking social and technological research, the project will study social, cultural, human security, legal and ethical dimensions of COP to understand how citizens and police can develop sustainable relations with the use of ICTs. We will explore how technological innovation can support COP in crime reporting and prevention. The project will explore ICT solutions to facilitate, strengthen and accelerate positive COP efforts and police-citizen interactions where trust levels are weak. Solutions will depend on the context and identified needs of end-users: communities, local police, national and international police (EU/UN), and policymakers, and may include citizen reporting, information monitoring, mobile value transfer, or improved organizational systems. The project includes a Policing Experts Network whose role is to support research planning, and dissemination and exploitation of findings, grounding the research in police practice. This will ensure findings are communicated by engaged police practitioners, and directly applied in COP education and training curricula in Europe and case countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-2-03 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2010

The food and health relationship focuses on maintenance of optimal health, both in terms of physiology and new European legislation. Yet, most accepted biomarkers quantify (intermediate) disease endpoints or damage. This has led to major problems in demonstrating health benefits and establishing health claims, and blocks competitive economic and health developments in the food sector. BIOCLAIMS develops new biomarkers by exploiting the new concept of health biomarkers through quantification of the robustness of the homeostatic mechanisms involved in maintaining optimal health, based on the assumption that the ability to maintain homeostasis in a continuously challenged environment and changing physiology is key for healthy ageing. Mechanisms involved will be investigated during a series of food interventions in animal models and humans using predisposed conditions. Human models of presumed impaired robustness in maintaining metabolic and vascular health will be employed to study the responses of established and novel biomarkers to the challenging of homeostasis and to selected food interventions. Both advanced analytical methodology including nutrigenomics tools (transcriptomics, metabolomics, fatty acid composition, adipokine profile, macromolecule damage) and whole body physiological assessments will be exploited to derive a series of new biomarkers. Gender differences will be addressed. BIOCLAIMS thus delivers a series of robust biomarkers predictive of a healthy metabolic phenotype during ageing, based on stressors of homeostasis, These biomarkers will be fully characterized and evaluated for practical application in human nutrition, and compared to traditional ones. The consortium consists of 11 teams, balanced in gender and geographical distribution, with track records in animal physiology, human studies in the relevant health areas, nutrigenomics and new analytical approaches, and scientific assessment of health claims in the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 7.59M | Year: 2010

Autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by an antibody response to citrullinated proteins. Periodontitis (PD) is largely caused by infection, in which Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen. The two diseases combine specific HLA-DRB1alleles and smoking as risk factors, and have a similar pathophysiology characterised by destructive inflammation. A possible causative link between RA and PD is based on the ability of P. gingivalis to citrullinate proteins and thereby generate autoantigens that drive autoimmunity in RA. We hypothesise that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies can be generated, in genetically susceptible individuals, as a consequence of P. Gingivalis-induced citrullination in the gingiva. In the context of genetic risk factors, during chronic exposure to danger signals, such as bacterial lipopolysacharides and DNA, tolerance to citrullinated proteins may be broken, with production of a pathogenic antibody response, which at a later time point cross-reacts with joint proteins and causes chronic RA. We will use a multidisciplinary approach (genetics, epidemiology, molecular immunology and animal models) to study susceptibility factors and immune responses in RA and PD, with an aim to identify novel etiological and pathogenic pathways, forming the basis for new therapies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-3.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2010

The aim of PROHIBIT is to understand existing guidelines and practices to prevent healthcare associated infections (HAI) in European hospitals, identify factors that enable and prevent compliance with best practices, and test the effectiveness of interventions of known efficacy. The project will employ a mixed-methods approach combining the strengths of qualitative research, survey methods, observational and experimental designs. First, we will systematically review current guidelines on prevention of the most common HAIs within the EU, as well as schemes for surveillance and public reporting. Next, we will conduct a large-scale survey of what is actually being done in European hospitals, determining factors, and how these relate to bloodstream infection rates. The project will then focus on catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), a highly transmissible and reliably measured HAI, in a selected sample of European hospitals. In-depth interviews of healthcare staff and direct observation will be used to measure compliance with key prevention practices. A randomized effectiveness trial using a stepped wedge design will be conducted in intensive care units to determine the uptake and impact of 2 interventions (WHO hand hygiene protocol and so-called catheter bundle) on CRBSI as well as clinical and utilization outcomes. The information will be synthesized to develop recommendations for the EU, policy makers, managers and medical professionals to prevent HAI. Dissemination will include instructional workshops and on-line training materials.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 2.43M | Year: 2017

Our society in Europe is still under prepared for the demographic changing situation of an ageing population which began several decades ago. This is visible in the age structure of the population and is reflected by the fact that the population aged 65 years and over is increasing in every European country. The growth in the elderly population may be explained by increased longevity, but at the same time, we also see an increase in debilitating conditions. However, it is also clear that the elderly are afflicted by challenging health conditions as a direct consequence of being elderly which impact their quality of life (QOL), e.g. living alone, depression, recovery from illness, immobility. This is what we would like to address. Living longer should be a privilege but there has been a collective failure to address social implications and QOL issues, where social care and the way it is funded are already in crisis. Our aim in this project is to couple the need for new societal approaches in addressing this changing demographic with improving the economy of green microenvironment sites, where health tourism and creating new jobs in this sector would in turn fund and provide benefits with respect to the well-being of the elderly. The ultimate outcome, through this pan-European academic and industrial project, will be: a) to derive cross-disciplinary and inter-sectorial knowledge of how to improve physical and mental well-being in the elderly, b) to characterise the environmental geology of Nemi and to correlate the identified features with improvements in health, well-being and recovery, c) to train a new generation of specialists in the sector of recreation and health for the tourism industry, d) the training of specialists in social and therapeutic horticulture (STH) as a way to improve physical and mental health, e) to create a model for health tourism, and f) to produce a business plan with an economic impact analysis.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.04M | Year: 2017

Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide. NSCLC alone make up about 75% of all lung cancers and most hospitals currently test all NSCLC patients for EGFR mutations (pharmacogenomics) for treatment decision (personalised medicine) i.e., patients with mutation(s) in EGFR gene should receive a EGFR-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) drug (e.g. afitinib) treatment; while those that do not present mutations in such gene, should be treated with chemotherapy. Currently, the laboratories use PCR and Sanger sequencing technologies to perform the EGFR analysis from tumour biopsies - Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) samples. Still, some patients (e.g., 30% in UK) may never get histological confirmation because they are too sick to make a biopsy. Furthermore, the results obtained with current methods still present low quality, mainly due to poor quality/low yield of DNA extracted from FFPE samples. The FP7 LungCARD project (www.lungcard.eu) has developed and demonstrated a LungCARD system - an automatic system composed by microfluidic chip and chip analyser - that allows to capture circulating tumour cells (CTCs) from blood samples, amplify by multiplex PCR and detect EGFR mutations, including also a software for data analysis and report. Although this new blood test has proven to be faster, cost-effective and human error-free, the detection of somatic mutations in EGFR gene at frequencies lower than 20% is still a weak point. Therefore, the main projects goal is to benefit from this technology, through the development, improvement, integration and validation of the LungCARD system with NGS workflow and development of a software for automatic reporting clinical results. However, LungCARD project aims to go further, by putting together a global and unique network of multidisciplinary scientists for exchange of knowledge and research training focused on non-small cell lung cancer.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.3.6 | Award Amount: 3.52M | Year: 2008

The proposed project aims at the development of a novel biochip based on monolithic, fully integrated biosensor array fabricated by standard Si-technology and its application to the early diagnosis of human diseases through label-free and multi-analyte detection.\nThe basic sensor scheme consists of a VIS-NIR light source and a waveguide monolithically fabricated on a silicon wafer, while its principle of operation is the spectroscopic interference due to the optical path difference originating by biochemical events. The signal recording will be realized either via an also monolithically fabricated photodetector or via an external spectrophotometer. This dual approach will provide the user with higher flexibility in terms of the recording, since it will exploit both the intensity and spectral characteristics of the output signal. The integrated nature of the basic biosensor scheme allows for the development of arrays tailored to specific diagnostic applications. Each biosensor array will be comprised of individually functionalized light source/optical fiber series coupled to a single detector for multiplexing operation. Encapsulation with an appropriately designed microfluidic system will allow for the easy delivery of the samples to be analyzed and ensure the facile contact with the external low-noise electronic components. The encapsulated array will be fixed on a cartridge with all the necessary electronics, ready to be manually inserted to its final position in the housing, where it will be directly connected to the optical and electrical interconnects. The biochip, controlled by accompanying user-friendly software, will be capable of simultaneous multi-analyte detection (e.g. mutations of specific genes), and real-time monitoring and processing, with a detection duration that will not exceed a few minutes with minimal blood sample volumes or specimens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.2 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2012

Concern for our food is growing in Europe, driven by industrialised food production and repeated crises. Current analytical technology is too expensive and bound to the laboratory to test more than a small fraction of 1% of the EUs food. This problem requires more massive screening of food and water extending from the source to the point of consumption. A low-cost and portable system delivering analytical data to a central location would help to prevent or identify early any food safety threat outbreaks and thereby massively reduce human suffering and its associated financial cost on both sides of the global divide. FOODSNIFFER is field-deployable and simple-to-use as a result of the integration of three major innovations: (i) the transducer itself, an all-silicon fully integrated optoelectronic platform based on Broad-Band Mach-Zehnder Interferometry capable of synchronous highly-sensitive label-free multi-analyte detection. This ultimately-integrated transducer due to the incorporation of the light-sources, sensing elements, spectral analyzer and photodetectors, in a single chip, can be used in single-shot cartridges. (ii) the innovative design of the wafer-scale microfluidics and filtration systems that unburden the reader of external pumps/valves, and intensive sample preparation. (iii) the development of a low-power reader controlled by a smartphone through a custom-produced application. The software controls the sensor and also processes its signal and then sends the results securely via the internet during the on-the-spot food safety analysis. FOODSNIFFER is a complete business solution which will be demonstrated in three areas of great importance to European society and regulators, viz. the detection of pesticide residues, mycotoxins and allergens in selected food categories in order to demonstrate field-based detection of harmful species at low concentrations, which is a feat unattained so far by any point-of-need system.


This paper discusses the floristic structure, distribution and habitat requirements of a new forest syntaxon, Populetum talassicae ass. nova. The potential range of the Populetum talassicae association comprises the central Pamir-Alai and Tian-Shan Mountains in Middle Asia. The biotope of this community comprises high mountain river valleys and shore zones of mountain lakes situated at elevations between 2200 and 2750 m. Phytocoenoses of the Populetum talassicae association are characterized by a clear predominance in the tree layer of a characteristic species of the association ? Populus talassica. Shrubs are not so abundant; however, the undergrowth layer of the community could reach up to 60% of the total cover, consisting mainly of Salix spp., Hipophaë rhamnoides, Lonicera stenantha, Juniperus semiglobosa and J. seravschanica. The herbaceous layer is quite rich and has about 20 species on average. Among associated species mainly meadow, rush and marsh taxa have been noted. Regarding the considerable cover of the meadow species, the association of Populetum talassicae has been classified as the Populetea laurifolio-suaveolentis syntaxon. A new plant alliance was proposed ? Populion talassicae all. nova with Pedicularis dolichorhiza and Astragalus tibetanus as diagnostic species. The described forest association is one of the rarest and most rapidly disappearing wood communities in Tajikistan, which means that special conservation attention is called for. © The Author(s) 2013 Published by Polish Botanical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 14.61M | Year: 2008

The project is focused on the definition of a comprehensive genetic epidemiological model of complex traits like Essential Hypertension (EH) and intermediate phenotypes of hypertension dependent/associated Target Organ Damages (TOD). To identify the common genetic variants relevant for the pathogenesis of EH and TODs, we will perform a Whole Genome Association (WGA) study of 4.000 subjects recruited from historical well-characterized European cohorts. Genotyping will be done with the Illumina Human 1M BeadChip. Well-established multi-variate techniques and innovative genomic analyses through machine learning techniques will be used for the WGA investigations. Using machine learning approach we aim at developing a disease model of EH integrating the available information on EH and TOD with relevant validated pathways and genetic/environmental information to mimic the clinicians recognition pattern of EH/TOD and their causes in an individual patient. Our statistical design is with two samples run in parallel, each with 1,000 cases and 1,000 controls, followed by a replication/joint analysis. This design is more powerful than replication alone and allows also a formal testing of the potential heterogeneity of findings compared to a single step (one large sample) design. The results represent the source to build a customized and inexpensive genetic diagnostic chip that can be validated in our existing cohorts (n=12,000 subjects). HYPERGENES is in the unique position to propose a ground-breaking project, improving the methodology of genetic epidemiology of chronic complex diseases that have a high prevalence among EU populations. Designing a comprehensive genetic epidemiological model of complex traits will also help us to translate genetic findings into improved diagnostic accuracy and new strategies for early detection, prevention and eventually personalised treatment of a complex trait. The ultimate goal will be to promote the quality of life of EU populations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.2-6 | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2009

The European Commission has identified the challenge of population ageing as the most pressing policy issue in the 21st century. As Europeans live longer and disabilities in this population increase, valid and comparable longitudinal data on their health is essential for evidence based policy making. Valid data requires better measurement instruments and methodologies for longitudinal and cross-population comparative analyses. After an in-depth critique of existing ageing studies, COURAGE in Europe will develop, and validate in three countries, measures of health and health-related outcomes for an ageing population. These measures will be grounded in the WHOs International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The ICF offers the only scientifically valid framework for evidence-based measurement of non-fatal health outcomes. We also propose to disentangle the confusion found in current ageing studies between objective states of health and subjective conditions of quality of life and well-being. These elements must be measured independently and against the background of the clear conceptual framework of health. COURAGE in Europe will enhance the scientific study of ageing by developing a tool to demonstrate the relevance to the ageing population of two environmental factors: the built environment and social networks. In sum, COURAGE in Europe is not proposing another ageing study, but the development of a tool to measure of health and health-related outcomes, for an ageing population, that offers objective and evidence-based prevalence trends, and which relates these to both quality of life and well-being outcomes as well as to the role of health determinants such as the built environment and social networks. Understanding ageing and its determinants will have a considerable impact on public health policies by identifying strategies for intervention.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-19-2014 | Award Amount: 4.86M | Year: 2015

A good functioning of the European food system is key to deliver food and nutrition security for all Europeans. However, that system faces many economic, environmental and social challenges as well as opportunities following socio-economic and technological developments, that are not equally distributed throughout the EU. Future policymaking aiming at healthy and resilient systems needs to take into account this differentiation and diversity of approaches, which necessitate foresight activities that take into account both the development of important driving forces as well as the social and spatial diversity. Primary productionthat is agriculture, fisheries and aquacultureforms the foundation of the food system. Its structure and performance is influenced by various conditions shaped by both the public and the private sector. As economic agents, primary producers aim at generating a sufficient amount of income, but their financial conditions are highly dependent on public and private actors, such as government regulators (including the EUs agricultural and fisheries policies), the financial sector, suppliers, the food industry, retailers, etc. In other words, the web of policy requirements as well as input and output market imperfections greatly shape farmers and fishermens livelihoods. Knowledge on the conditions of primary producers and the driving forces influencing these conditions exists, but in a fragmented way: not all primary producers and regions are covered, not all driving forces have been investigated, cross-linkages between them have been insufficiently analysed, future opportunities are not well integrated, etc. The purpose of SUFISA is to identify sustainable practices and policies in the agricultural, fish and food sectors that support the sustainability of primary producers in a context of multi-dimensionsal policy requirements, market uncertainties and globalisation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 6.14M | Year: 2015

The objective of the ATHLOS Project is to achieve a better understanding of ageing by identifying patterns of healthy ageing pathways or trajectories, the determinants of those patterns, the critical points in time when changes in trajectories are produced, and to propose timely clinical and public health interventions to optimise healthy ageing. Moreover, a new definition of old age based on many characteristics rather than just the classical chronological definition of age will be used for calculating projections in each specific population and guide policy recommendations. To do so, the Consortium will create a harmonised dataset with over 341,000 individuals collated from existing longitudinal studies of ageing and including information on physical and mental health, biomarkers, life style habits, social environment and participation, among others. A single metric of healthy ageing using Item Response Theory (IRT) methods with individual items from the surveys will be used. Diverse statistical methods will be employed to define the trajectories (Generalised Estimating Equations, Structural Equation Modelling, Growth Curve Mixture Modelling, the TRAJ method and classification algorithms). Age Period Cohort will be used in the analysis to understand age cohort effects. Specific interventions both at the clinical and population level will be designed based on projects results and will be disseminated. Additionally, the impact of those interventions on healthy ageing will be assessed with the micro-simulation method. Stakeholders will participate in the definition of outcomes, the creation of interventions and dissemination of results. ATHLOS will make available to scientists and stakeholders its resources by providing access to the methodology of harmonisation and to the mega-data set of ageing cohorts. To maximise the policy impact, target audiences will be indentified and specific materials disseminated.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-6.2-01;SSH-2007-2.1-03 | Award Amount: 1.74M | Year: 2008

Given the lack of systematic research on the assessment of patient payment policies in Europe and worldwide, and the urging need of (re-)evaluating patient payment policies in Central and Eastern Europe due to the widely spread informal patient payments, our project will focus on these issues. The aim of the project is to identify a comprehensive set of tangible evidence-based criteria suitable for the assessment of patient payment policies and to develop a policy projection tool that can be used to analyze the efficiency, equity and quality impacts of these polices. The set of assessment criteria and the projection tool that will be developed in this project, will be validated by their application in Central and Eastern European countries. In addition to this, the project aims to assure an extensive dissemination of project results involving policy-makers, health care professionals and the general public. The project results will contribute to the overall progress in research focused on the methodology of policy evaluation, as well as in research focused on the analysis of the Central and Eastern European health care reforms. Seven countries will be included: advanced Central European countries (Hungary and Poland), advanced former Soviet republics in Europe (Lithuania), less advanced Eastern European countries (Bulgaria and Romania), and less advanced Former Soviet republics in Europe (Ukraine). The comparison between these countries will help to establish to what extent the country context influences the evaluation of patient payment policies. The project will have a direct relation to Theme 8, but will also address the general objectives defined in the work program, of policy harmonization, capacity building, mobility of scholars, strengthening competitiveness, international cooperation and solution to social problems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: SEC-2011.7.4-1 | Award Amount: 8.18M | Year: 2012

The EUROFORGEN-NoE proposal aims to develop a network of excellence for the creation of a European Virtual Centre of Forensic Genetic Research. Forensic genetics is a highly innovative field of applied science with a strong impact on the security of citizens. However, the genetic methods to identify offenders as well as the creation of national DNA databases have caused concerns to the possible violation of privacy rights. Furthermore, studies to assess the societal dimension of security following the implementation of even more intrusive methods such as the genetic prediction of externally visible characteristics are highly relevant for their public acceptance. The network includes some of the leading groups in European forensic genetic research. It aims to create a closer integration of existing collaborations, as well as establishing new interactions in the field of security, as all key players are addressed: scientists, stakeholders, end-users, educational centres and scientific societies. Only if a long-term collaborative network can be established it will become possible to connect all scientific groups active in the field of forensic genetics, and to initiate a sustained effort covering all aspects of research. These efforts have to be combined with identifying and selecting the most innovative ideas to meet the challenges of analyzing biological crime scene samples compromised by degradation or indentified as mixtures of traces from multiple human sources. The proposal integrates five working packages. WP 1 is devoted to management and coordination. WP 2 will lead the activities aimed at the creation of the virtual centre of research. WP 3 will carry out exemplar projects as models of collaboration and integration of cutting edge research, later complemented by a competitive call for new research projects. The societal dimension of security as well as the ethical and legal aspects wil be addressed in WP 4, whereas WP 5 is devoted to education and training.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-2.4-1 | Award Amount: 11.62M | Year: 2009

A major challenge facing European industry involves the development of more specific, energy saving processes with less environmental impact. The recent development of Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) may prove a major milestone in achieving these goals. MACADEMIA project is an extension to an FP6 STREP (DeSANNS) which highlighted some MOF materials for CO2 capture and storage. It will expand and continue this work on a much larger scale. The three Total branches will focus on bringing MOFs to key market sectors - gas separation and storage, liquid separation and catalysis. The Total-led consortium, with 11 academic partners from across EU, one leading South Korean partner, among world leaders among their particular domain of MOF science, will be contributing to the project, with a dedicated management partner. MACADEMIA intends to produce new MOFs and optimise those already of promising interest, characterise MOFs using specialised techniques, test MOFs using a three-tiered process, use predictive modelling and demonstrate the use of MOFs in key industrial processes. It will target separation processes in gas / vapour phase (propene/propane, acid gases separation, CO2 and H2 purification), in liquid phase (xylene separations, recovery of N- and/or S-compounds from hydrocarbons), and in catalysis (Lewis-acid MOFs as catalysts for epoxide polymerization, redox-active MOFs as catalysts for hydrocarbon autoxidation). Several of MACADEMIAs targets are expected to reach pilot scale whereas a blue sky approach will be taken for others giving room for innovation and step change. An attractive project, it is open to young researchers with industrially coordinated research to counterbalance competition from USA and Japan and able to contribute to a strong ERA.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.2.2-4 | Award Amount: 840.61K | Year: 2008

AIM. To investigate the reasons for the exclusion of the elderly in clinical trials and to provide solutions for this problem. INTRODUCTION. Although the elderly account for high drug consumption, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. With an increasingly ageing European population it is essential to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of drugs. Clinical trials need to take into account the relevant issues of this population, i.e. changed metabolism, multiple chronic conditions and poly-pharmacy. To examine this issue and effect a paradigm shift it is necessary to target gatekeepers and stakeholders of clinical trials. METHODS. The project will be coordinated by the Medical Economics and Research Centre, Sheffield, with guidance from the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Ageing at Keele University, UK. The 5 work packages (WP) will be carried out by a multi-disciplinary team of highly qualified experts in Geriatrics, Gerontology and social sciences. WP1 will involve a systematic review of the literature and review of ongoing clinical trials to assess the extent of exclusion of the elderly. Based on these findings WP2 and WP 3 will investigate why the elderly are underrepresented in clinical trials and what can be done to improve their participation. This will be carried out in 9 countries: UK, Spain, Holland, Italy, Poland, Lithuania, Romania, Israel and the Czech Republic. WP2 will research the views of health professionals and ethicists using structured questionnaires. WP3 will explore the perceptions of older patients and carers using a focus group methodology. For WP4, the recommendations from WP2 and WP3 will be used to develop a charter for the elderly in clinical trials. WP5 will disseminate and implement the findings. CONCLUSION. PREDICT will promote the inclusion of the elderly in clinical trials in Europe. This project will facilitate the improvement of the rights of older people and the quality of health care for the ageing population.


The early Toarcian (Early Jurassic) global marine mass extinction is usually related to the development of organic-rich sediments preserved as black shales and interpreted as a global oceanic anoxic eventthe Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE). In the Betic Cordillera, southern Spain, the deep-marine Fuente de la Vidriera section contains the T-OAE as recorded at the westernmost part of the European Tethys. Ichnological analysis of the section indicates a relatively abundant and moderately diverse trace-fossil assemblage composed of Alcyonidiopsis isp., Chondrites isp., Nereites isp., Palaeophycus heberti, Planolites isp., Teichichnus isp., Thalassinoides isp., and Trichichnus linearis. A well-developed endobenthic multi-tiered community is characterized by an upper tier represented by homogenized sedimentindividual burrows difficult to discern, a middle tier with a relatively diverse trace-fossil assemblage of mainly vagile deposit feeders, and a lower tier with activities of semisessile deposit feeders. The ichnoassemblage indicates oxic or slightly dysoxic bottom waters that were relatively favorable for benthic organisms. The absence of anoxia is confirmed by previously published geochemical and isotopic data. The T-OAE did not induce extreme conditions for macrobenthic organisms inhabiting the seafloor in this area of the westernmost Tethys. Local factors probably limited the influence of the anoxic event in bottom waters but may have induced oxygen deficiency in upper water masses, producing unfavorable living conditions for pelagic biota and, consequently, a sudden decrease in ammonite abundance. © 2010 SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).


Peresypkina E.V.,RAS Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry | Majcher A.M.,Jagiellonian University | Rams M.,Jagiellonian University | Vostrikova K.E.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1
Chemical Communications | Year: 2014

The first single chain magnet (SCM) based on orbitally degenerate hexacyanoosmate(iii) was prepared. The high values of energy barriers for the [Mn(acacen)Os(CN)6]2- complex of 81 and 48.4 K are the result of interplay of three axes anisotropic coupling of [Os(CN) 6]3- with zero field splitted Mn3+. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.


Iacobone M.,University of Padua | Jansson S.,Sahlgrenska University Hospital | Barczynski M.,Jagiellonian University | Goretzki P.,Lukaskrankenhaus Neuss
Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery | Year: 2014

Background: Multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma (MPTC) has been reported in literature in 18-87 % of cases. This paper aims to review controversies in the molecular pathogenesis, prognosis, and management of MPTC. Methods: A review of English-language literature focusing on MPTC was carried out, and analyzed in an evidence-based perspective. Results were discussed at the 2013 Workshop of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons devoted to surgery of thyroid carcinoma. Results: Literature reports no prospective randomized studies; thus, a relatively low level of evidence may be achieved. Conclusions: MPTC could be the result of either true multicentricity or intrathyroidal metastasis from a single malignant focus. Radiation and familial nonmedullary thyroid carcinoma are conditions at risk of MPTC development. The prognostic importance of multifocal tumor growth in PTC remains controversial. Prognosis might be impaired in clinical MPTC but less or none in MPTC <1 cm. MPTC can be diagnosed preoperatively by FNAB and US, with low sensitivity for MPTC <1 cm. Total or near-total thyroidectomy is indicated to reduce the risk of local recurrence. Prophylactic central node dissection should be considered in patients with total tumor diameter >1 cm, or in cases with high number of cancer foci. Completion thyroidectomy might be necessary when MPTC is diagnosed after less than near-total thyroidectomy. Radioactive iodine ablation should be considered in selected patients with MPTC at increased risk of recurrence or metastatic spread. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.


Dlotko P.,University of Pennsylvania | Dlotko P.,Jagiellonian University | Specogna R.,University of Udine
Computer Physics Communications | Year: 2013

The issue of computing (co)homology generators of a cell complex is gaining a pivotal role in various branches of science. While this issue may be rigorously solved in polynomial time, it is still overly demanding for large scale problems. Drawing inspiration from low-frequency electrodynamics, this paper presents a physics inspired algorithm for first cohomology group computations on three-dimensional complexes. The algorithm is general and exhibits orders of magnitude speed up with respect to competing ones, allowing to handle problems not addressable before. In particular, when generators are employed in the physical modeling of magneto-quasistatic problems, this algorithm solves one of the most long-lasting problems in low-frequency computational electromagnetics. In this case, the effectiveness of the algorithm and its ease of implementation may be even improved by introducing the novel concept of lazy cohomology generators. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Abbott M.C.,University of Cape Town | Aniceto I.,University of Lisbon | Aniceto I.,Jagiellonian University
Nuclear Physics B | Year: 2015

We study certain spinning strings exploring the flat directions of AdS3×S3×S3×S1, the massless sector cousins of su(2) and sl(2) sector spinning strings. We describe these, and their vibrational modes, using the D(2, 1;α)2 algebraic curve. By exploiting a discrete symmetry of this structure which reverses the direction of motion on the spheres, and alters the masses of the fermionic modes s→κ-s, we find out how to treat the massless fermions which were previously missing from this formalism. We show that folded strings behave as a special case of circular strings, in a sense which includes their mode frequencies, and we are able to recover this fact in the worldsheet formalism. We use these frequencies to calculate one-loop corrections to the energy, with a version of the Beisert-Tseytlin resummation. © 2015 The Authors.


Kaminska-Winciorek G.,Center for Cancer Prevention and Treatment | Spiewak R.,Jagiellonian University
Postepy Dermatologii i Alergologii | Year: 2013

Nevus comedonicus (NC) is a very rare, benign hamartoma characterised by the occurrence of dilated, comedo-like openings, typically on the face, neck, upper arms, chest or abdomen. In uncertain cases, histopathological examination confirms the diagnosis. The authors suggest dermoscopy as a rapid and useful method of initial diagnosis of nevus comedonicus based upon its distinctive dermoscopic features. The dermoscopy reveals numerous lightand dark-brown, circular or barrel-shaped, homogenous areas with prominent keratin plugs.


Plesnar E.,Jagiellonian University | Subczynski W.K.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Pasenkiewicz-Gierula M.,Jagiellonian University
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes | Year: 2012

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a mono-cis-unsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer and a POPC bilayer containing 50 mol% cholesterol (POPC-Chol50) were carried out for 200 ns to compare the spatial organizations of the pure POPC bilayer and the POPC bilayer saturated with Chol. The results presented here indicate that saturation with Chol significantly narrows the distribution of vertical positions of the center-of-mass of POPC molecules and POPC atoms in the bilayer. In the POPC-Chol50 bilayer, the same moieties of the lipid molecules are better aligned at a given bilayer depth, forming the following clearly separated membrane regions: the polar headgroup, the rigid core consisting of steroid rings and upper fragments of the acyl chains, and the fluid hydrocarbon core consisting of Chol chains and the lower fragments of POPC chains. The membrane surface of the POPC-Chol50 bilayer is smooth. The results have biological significance because the POPC-Chol50 bilayer models the bulk phospholipid portion of the fiber-cell membrane in the eye lens. It is hypothesized that in the eye lens cholesterol-induced smoothing of the membrane surface decreases light-scattering and helps to maintain lens transparency.


Binkowski L.J.,Pedagogical University of Cracow | Sawicka-Kapusta K.,Jagiellonian University
Chemosphere | Year: 2015

During the studies in 2003, high concentrations of cadmium (Cd) were noted among Mallards and Coots in Poland. Further research, five years later, showed the histopathological alterations in birds from the same area which were probably stimulated by Cd. This paper presents the analysis of Cd in ten different materials collected from these species (n=180) in years 2006-2009 in two areas, including southern - Zator and western Poland - Milicz. Similarly high concentrations to those from 2003 were noted only in kidneys of Mallards from the Zator area (up to 56.49μgg-1d.w.). Other comparable materials accumulated significantly lower concentration of Cd. Generally, lower concentrations occurred in birds from Milicz. Concentrations varied also between species and age groups. They correlated between liver and kidneys, brain and muscle and brain and spleen. Potential in vivo bioindicators (blood, feathers and excrements) did not seem to be useful as biomarkers in both areas. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Plesnar E.,Jagiellonian University | Subczynski W.K.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Pasenkiewicz-Gierula M.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of Physical Chemistry B | Year: 2013

Models created with molecular dynamics simulations are used to compare the organization and dynamics of cholesterol (Chol) molecules in three different environments: (1) a hydrated pure Chol bilayer that models the Chol bilayer domain, which is a pure Chol domain embedded in the bulk membrane; (2) a 2-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-d-glycerol-1-phosphorylcholine bilayer saturated with cholesterol (POPC-Chol50) that models the bulk membrane; (3) a Chol crystal. The computer model of the hydrated pure Chol bilayer is stable on the microsecond time scale. Some structural characteristics of Chol molecules in the Chol bilayer are similar to those in the POPC-Chol50 bilayer (e.g., tilt of Chol rings and chains), while others are similar to those in Chol crystals (e.g., surface area per Chol, bilayer thickness). The key result of this study is that the Chol bilayer has, unexpectedly, a dynamic structure, with Chol mobility similar to that in the POPC-Chol50 bilayer though slower. This is the major difference compared to Chol crystals, where Chol molecules are immobile. Also, water accessibility to Chol-OH groups in the Chol bilayer is not limited. On average, each Chol molecule makes 2.3 hydrogen bonds with water in the Chol bilayer, compared with 1.7 hydrogen bonds in the POPC-Col50 bilayer. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Arodz H.,Jagiellonian University | Swierczynski Z.,Pedagogical University of Cracow
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2011

We present a new class of oscillons in the (1+1)-dimensional signum-Gordon model. The oscillons periodically move to and fro in space. They have finite total energy, finite size, and are strictly periodic in time. The corresponding solutions of the scalar field equation are explicitly constructed from the second order polynomials in the time and position coordinates. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Brzezicki W.,Jagiellonian University | Brzezicki W.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Brzezicki W.,University of Salerno | Oles A.M.,Jagiellonian University | And 3 more authors.
Physical Review X | Year: 2015

We investigate the changes in spin and orbital patterns induced by magnetic transition-metal ions without an orbital degree of freedom doped in a strongly correlated insulator with spin-orbital order. In this context, we study the 3d ion substitution in 4d transition-metal oxides in the case of 3d3 doping at either 3d2 or 4d4 sites, which realizes orbital dilution in a Mott insulator. Although we concentrate on this doping case as it is known experimentally and more challenging than other oxides due to finite spin-orbit coupling, the conclusions are more general. We derive the effective 3d - 4d (or 3d - 3d) superexchange in a Mott insulator with different ionic valencies, underlining the emerging structure of the spin-orbital coupling between the impurity and the host sites, and demonstrate that it is qualitatively different from that encountered in the host itself. This derivation shows that the interaction between the host and the impurity depends in a crucial way on the type of doubly occupied t2g orbital. One finds that in some cases, due to the quench of the orbital degree of freedom at the 3d impurity, the spin and orbital order within the host is drastically modified by doping. The impurity either acts as a spin defect accompanied by an orbital vacancy in the spin-orbital structure when the host-impurity coupling is weak or favors doubly occupied active orbitals (orbital polarons) along the 3d - 4d bond leading to antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic spin coupling. This competition between different magnetic couplings leads to quite different ground states. In particular, for the case of a finite and periodic 3d atom substitution, it leads to striped patterns either with alternating ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic domains or with islands of saturated ferromagnetic order. We find that magnetic frustration and spin degeneracy can be lifted by the quantum orbital flips of the host, but they are robust in special regions of the incommensurate phase diagram. Orbital quantum fluctuations modify quantitatively spin-orbital order imposed by superexchange. In contrast, the spin-orbit coupling can lead to anisotropic spin and orbital patterns along the symmetry directions and cause a radical modification of the order imposed by the spin-orbital superexchange. Our findings are expected to be of importance for future theoretical understanding of experimental results for 4d transition-metal oxides doped with 3d3 ions. We suggest how the local or global changes of the spin-orbital order induced by such impurities could be detected experimentally.


Kaczara P.,Jagiellonian University | Sarna T.,Jagiellonian University | Burke J.M.,Medical College of Wisconsin
Free Radical Biology and Medicine | Year: 2010

Oxidative injury to cells such as the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is often modeled using H2O2-treated cultures, but H2O2 concentrations are not sustained in culture medium. Here medium levels of H2O2 and cytotoxicity were analyzed in ARPE-19 cultures after H2O2 delivery as a single pulse or with continuous generation using glucose oxidase (GOx). When added as a pulse, H2O2 is rapidly depleted (within 2 h); cytotoxicity at 24 h, determined by the MTT assay for mitochondrial function, is unaffected by medium replacement at 2 h. Continuous generation of H2O2 produces complex outcomes. At low GOx concentrations, H2O2 levels are sustained by conditions under which generation matches depletion, but when GOx concentrations produce cytotoxic levels of H2O2, oxidant depletion accelerates. Acceleration results partly from the release of contents from oxidant-damaged cells as indicated by testing depletion after controlled membrane disruption with detergents. Cytotoxicity analyses show that cells can tolerate short exposure to high H2O2 doses delivered as a pulse but are susceptible to lower chronic doses. The results provide broadly applicable guidance for using GOx to produce sustained H2O2 levels in cultured cells. This approach will be specifically useful for modeling chronic stress relevant to RPE aging and have a wider value for studying cellular effects of sublethal oxidant injury and for evaluating antioxidants that may protect significantly against mild but not lethal stress. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Monaco P.,University of Perugia | Rodriguez-Tovar F.J.,University of Granada | Uchman A.,Jagiellonian University
Palaios | Year: 2012

Dark, pelagic sediments of the uppermost Cenomanian Bonarelli Level (OAE2 event) interval, in two classical sections Contessa and Bottaccione in the Central Apennines, contain unbioturbated and bioturbated beds suggesting fluctuations in pore water oxygenation from anoxic to oxic or dysoxic conditions. The oxic and dysoxic improvement events prior to, during, and after the event are marked by biogenic structures showing an increase in the diversity of the trace fossils (Chondrites, Planolites, Thalassinoides, Trichichnus, and Zoophycos) from none to five ichnotaxa in individual beds. The number of anoxic events differs in the Contessa and Bottaccione sections, even though they are only 2.5 km apart. Comparison with sections from the Carpathians (Poland) and the Betic Cordillera (Spain), reveals that minor anoxic events below and above the Bonarelli Level are absent in the studied Apennine sections. Moreover, the diversity and density of trace fossils in the Apennine sections are lower than those from other studied sections in the Tethys, most likely indicating a comparatively lower availability of food in the Gubbio area as a result of its paleogeographic location. The preservation of trace fossils, controlled by the consistency of sediments and diagenetic processes, can mask diversity and density in some beds. © 2012 SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SiS-2009-2.2.3.1 | Award Amount: 3.77M | Year: 2010

The aim of ESTABLISH is to facilitate and implement an inquiry based approach in the teaching and learning of science and technology across Europe, mainly focussed, through the collaborative actions of the consortium, on appropriate teacher education and support using trialled and tested resource material particularly suited to inquiry based teaching. Inquiry based teaching methodologies are encouraged to engage students in science and mathematics by increasing their interest in science and also by stimulating teacher motivation. However, widespread implementation of such a methodology will only occur with inclusion and participation of all partners in education, both formal and informal. ESTABLISH addresses this by drawing together over 60 partners from across 11 European countries to work together on a 48 month multidisciplinary project to encourage and promote the more widespread use of inquiry-based science teaching techniques in second level schools through appropriate teacher education, creation of authentic learning environments and actions to bridge the gap between the science education research community, science teachers, students, parents, local industry as well as policy makers in order to facilitate the uptake of inquiry-based science teaching. The outcomes of this project will firstly be a large team of teachers across Europe who are skilled and confident in their delivery of inquiry based teaching. Further outcomes will be the identification of suitable model(s) of teacher education, at both pre- and in-service levels, for inquiry based teaching and also identification of best practice in guiding change through all the stakeholders involved in science and science education. Teachers are active partners as developers, researchers and agents so that real change in classroom practice can be achieved. ESTABLISH is committed to sharing and disseminating best practice in inquiry-based methods through European teacher networks, conferences and publications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GERI-4-2014 | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2015

With the main goal to address gender equality in Research & Innovation the proposing GENERA (Gender Equality Network in the European Research Area) consortium has been formed to apply a bottom-up approach to enhance gender equality in the field of physics research as a benchmark for other sciences. Physics is a research field with a low representation of female researchers and a masculine image, so this field as such being represented by different actors will be the basis for GENERA analysis and interventions. GENERA comprises a starting set of organisations active in the field of physics, which are committed to the implementation of the project and to the achievement of its milestones. The consortium proposing the project will be extended to involve other interested major physics research organisations in European countries as associate partners. The GENERA consortium requests funding to support research organisations in implementing gender equality plans and proposes the following coordination and support actions with a focus on physics research and a keen eye on cultural differences throughout Europe by the following steps: 1. Assess the status of gender issues in the partner organisations. 2. Identify gaps in existing Gender Equality Plans (GEPs) and determine specific needs or actions to enhance gender equality and women careers in physics. 3. Monitor and evaluate the existing activities of the involved organisations (partners and associates). 4. Formulate customized GEPs for all implementing organizations and create a roadmap for their implementation in physics with the potential of application in other research fields. 5. Support involved organisations in implementing customized GEPs. 6. Create a network of RPOs, HEIs and RFOs to promote gender equality in physics. 7. Set up a long-term monitoring system allowing RPOs and RFOs monitoring the impact of their GEPs in physics with the potential of application in other research fields.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.3-8 | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2008

CEED3 (Collaborative European Effort to Develop Diabetes Diagnostics) has as its central objective, the development of diagnostic tools to differentiate specific subgroups of diabetic patients to allow individualisation of patient care. CEED3 will achieve this by integrating basic science findings from animal models, cell studies, and large scale genetic studies with clinical observations and testing of patients phenotype. The development of diabetes diagnostic tools will involve a clearly defined process of discovery of potential novel genetic and non-genetic biomarkers, validation within test and population based data samples, development of a clinical application and then dissemination of this application. The areas of focus for the diabetes diagnostics will be three areas where there is potential for considerable improvement in care and reduction in the burden of diabetes: the identification of patients with specific subgroups of monogenic diabetes, the identification of non diabetic and diabetic subjects with initial pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction at high risk of rapidly deteriorating glycaemia and the detection of diabetic patients at increased risk of vascular complications. For each of these patient groups the identification of the subgroups will result in improved clinical care by allowing treatment to be tailored for the individual patient. Therefore, the goal of this proposal is to make a rapid translation from scientific discoveries to improved care for diabetic patients. CEED3 has assembled the best researchers, clinical samples and technical expertise in Europe to realise this goal.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.9.7 | Award Amount: 9.19M | Year: 2013

The PAMS project will explore all scientific and technological aspects of the fabrication of planar atomic and sub-molecular scale electronic devices on surfaces of Si:H, Ge:H, AlN, CaCO3 (calcite) and CaF2 with atomic scale precision and reproducibility. The sub-nanoscale devices will be made by combining ultra-precise Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) and non-contact-Atomic Force Microscopy (NC-AFM) atomic and molecular manipulation, including hydrogen extraction from passivated surfaces, controlled local doping and on-surface chemical synthesis of molecular devices and wires by coupling of precursors.\nPAMS will develop new solutions to reliably address sub-nanometer scale devices from the human scale by developing a new generation of low-temperature interconnection and manipulation machines comprising four STM/NC-AFM heads with sub- precision, allowing for contacting nanopads connected to dangling bond nanowires, doped silicon nanowires or molecular nanowires. Understanding and optimization of the electronic structures of these nanowires and of the contacts between the various components of the planar device will be one of the central objectives. The atomic and molecular devices will include dangling bond circuitries, functionalized by coupling with organic molecules, and controlled by remote alteration of molecular states by local band bending; alternatively multi-branch polyaromatic logical gates will be synthesized and addressed by up to four nanowires.\nPAMS will address the novel theoretical challenges posed by these planar devices. Accordingly, new methodological tools will be developed, allowing for a multiscale description (using from first-principles to empirical force-fields) of the structural, electronic and transport properties of such atomic and molecular devices, as well as their fabrication and characterization. These new theoretical tools will ultimately permit us to optimize the design and synthesis of atomic and molecular gates.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: PEOPLE-2007-1-1-ITN | Award Amount: 2.84M | Year: 2008

COSI integrates young researchers in a network of 10 leading European research centres, including Bayer BioScience as industrial partner. We aim at identification of regulatory principles governing chloroplast metabolism, a crucial factor for agricultural productivity. Specifically we want to identify chloroplast-related protein kinases and their targets and associated calcium signals. A long term objective of COSI is increased plant productivity under stress conditions. COSI has expertise in various aspects of photosynthesis in algae and higher plants and in plant signal transduction. This unique combination will be used to identify major regulatory principles of plant organellar metabolism principally also applying far beyond the plant field. Thus training and knowledge can be transferred to many other fields in life sciences. An integrated working programme consisting of working packages, jointly coordinated by two groups of the network, guarantees maximal use of complementary expertises and strengthens ongoing interactions between partners. In addition to intensive exchange and collaboration of the involved young researchers, special training courses will introduce the young researchers in basic methods, which are required for their work and furthermore help them to develop complementary skills. Early stage researchers will be supported by a mentoring programme to enhance their personnel development. Special emphasis will be placed on promotion of women. A training course at Bayer BioScience will expose young researchers to an industrial environment and provide them with industrial relevant skills. COSI will offer hands-on training in cutting-edge technologies such as bioinformatics, live-cell imaging, mass spectrometry and metabolomics and establish an outstanding European research community in organellar signal transduction, an emerging new and competitive research field of central importance in life sciences.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MSCA-NIGHT-2014 | Award Amount: 443.72K | Year: 2014

The project Malopolska Researchers Night will be implemented in the years 2014 and 2015 respectively for the eighth and ninth time. The event has already permanently inscribed in the calendar of Malopolska scientific events, enjoying growing from year to year popular among participants and becoming one of the biggest Nights in Europe. In 2013, this event was attended by over 55 thousand people, while in the first year of the project (2007) the event was attended only by 3.5 thousand people. The event program specified in the application is even richer than before it will take over 1 thousand activities, mainly interactive workshops, presentations, demonstrations and experiments as well as shows with the participation of scientists. It is estimated that 60 thousand people will participate in the events in 2014 and 65 thousand people in 2015. Malopolska Researchers Night is to first of all show participants how interesting is the work of scientists and how fascinating they are people. Through fun, in accessible and understandable way for everybody, we want to show that all around us is the science, and that scientists in their laboratories are working every day to make our life better, easier and more modern. The main motto of the project for the years 2014 and 2015 will be to present the successes of Malopolska scientists working in international scientific-research teams. The event will be held in six cities of the Region: Krakow, Tarnow, Nowy Sacz and Niepolomice and - for the first time in 2014 - also in Skawina and Andrychow. In addition, it is planned the live broadcast from selected locations via event website. The program will be prepared by almost 900 researchers, more than 1 600 students, about 120 research groups from more than 30 partners. Thanks to the extensive promotional campaign the information about the event will reach to nearly 3.5 million people each year.


CrowdReviews.com Partnered with Conference Series Announces - Exploring the 3D World of Biomolecules Eminent researcher, Prof. Miachel G Rossmann of Purdue University was a Keynote speaker at Other renowned speakers at promises another exemplary event in 2017, the "9th International Conference on Everyone interested in structural biology, biophysics and molecular biology is encouraged to attend the event. Connect with their social network pages to get regular industry updates. Program Coordinator Structural Biology 2017 conferenceseries.com www.structuralbiology.conferenceseries.com E-mail: Phone: +1 (702) 508-5200 Ext: 8033 Naples, FL, December 06, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Structural Biology is a multi-disciplinary field which aims in exploring various dimensions of biomolecules. 3D structure prediction has been one of the major aspects in structural biology which in turn is used for drug discovery. In order to progress the discoveries in this field, a platform is essential, where researchers can discuss about their novel discoveries and collaborate for their further researches. Structural Biology Conference Series provides one such platform by conducting Structural Biology Conferences annually. These conferences mainly aim in bringing biophysics, bioinformatics and molecular biology researchers from all over the world under a single roof, where they discuss their researches, discoveries and advancements in the field. Previous meeting ‘ Structural Biology 2016 ’ was held in New Orleans, USA during August 22-23, 2016 with a huge success. The next year event, Structural Biology 2017 is scheduled at the beautiful city of Europe: Zurich, Switzerland during September 18-19, 2017.Eminent researcher, Prof. Miachel G Rossmann of Purdue University was a Keynote speaker at Structural Biology 2016 . He has shared his overview on Structural Virology in his keynote lecture. Also he presented another talk in the meeting where he laid a special focus on his research on Zika Virus. He said "When Zika started to be recognized as a major threat to humanity, cryoEM had advanced to allow us to determine the structure of Zika virus to near-atomic resolution using only cryoEM. The most important difference between dengue and Zika virus was found to be at a glycosylation site which is suspected to be involved in the recognition of molecules on the surface of potential host cells."Other renowned speakers at Structural Biology 2016 included, Jeffrey Skolnick from Georgia Institute of Technology, USA; Bi-Cheng Wang from University of Georgia, USA; Robert M Stroud from University of California, San Francisco, USA; John H. Miller, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, Irena Roterman-Konieczna, Jagiellonian University, Poland, Shigeyuki Yokoyama, RIKEN Structural Biology Laboratory, Japan; who gave their fruitful contributions in the form of highly informative presentations and made the conference a top notch one. Structural Biology Conference Series promises another exemplary event in 2017, the "9th International Conference on Structural Biology " between September 18-19, 2017 at Zurich, Switzerland. They are looking forward to gathering all the top class research from every corner of the world in 2017 meeting as well. Also they are looking forward to high quality scientific sessions and networking opportunities.Everyone interested in structural biology, biophysics and molecular biology is encouraged to attend the event. Connect with their social network pages to get regular industry updates.Program CoordinatorStructural Biology 2017conferenceseries.comwww.structuralbiology.conferenceseries.comE-mail: structuralbiology@biochemconferences.org Phone: +1 (702) 508-5200 Ext: 8033


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-14-2015 | Award Amount: 7.97M | Year: 2016

Uveal melanoma (UM) is a rare intraocular tumour with an incidence of 5 cases per million individuals per year. Up to 50% of UM patients develop metastases, most often in the liver, and these are invariably fatal. Despite new discoveries in the genetic and molecular background of the primary tumour, little is known about the metastatic disease; furthermore, there is no therapy to either prevent or treat UM metastases. In UM Cure 2020, we aim to identify and validate at the preclinical level novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of UM metastases. For this purpose, the consortium brings together the major experts of UM in both patient care and basic/translational/clinical research, as well as patient representatives. An ambitious multidisciplinary approach is proposed to move from patient tissue characterisation to preclinical evaluation of single or combinations of drugs. This approach includes the characterisation of the genetic landscape of metastatic UM and its microenvironment, proteomic studies to address signal pathway deregulation and establishment of novel relevant in vitro and in vivo UM models. We also aim to validate accurate surrogate endpoint biomarkers to evaluate therapies and detect metastases as early as possible. Underpinning this will be the UM Cure 2020 virtual biobank registry, linking existing biobanks into a harmonised network, which will prospectively collect primary and metastatic UM samples. Together, our approach will lead to the identification of new therapies, allowing the initiation of UM-dedicated clinical trials sponsored by academia or pharma. Dissemination of results will include the building of a patient network across the countries as part of the consortium as well as a dedicated UM patient and caregivers data portal as part of the UM Cure 2020 website, in order to increase patient information and disease awareness.


Handy T.,Florida State University | Plewa T.,Florida State University | Odrzywolek A.,Jagiellonian University
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2014

We study the evolution of the collapsing core of a 15 M blue supergiant supernova progenitor from the core bounce until 1.5 s later. We present a sample of hydrodynamic models parameterized to match the explosion energetics of SN 1987A. We find the spatial model dimensionality to be an important contributing factor in the explosion process. Compared to two-dimensional (2D) simulations, our three-dimensional (3D) models require lower neutrino luminosities to produce equally energetic explosions. We estimate that the convective engine in our models is 4% more efficient in 3D than in 2D. We propose that the greater efficiency of the convective engine found in 3D simulations might be due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio of convective plumes, which aids in distributing energy deposited by neutrinos. We do not find evidence of the standing accretion shock instability or turbulence being a key factor in powering the explosion in our models. Instead, the analysis of the energy transport in the post-shock region reveals characteristics of penetrative convection. The explosion energy decreases dramatically once the resolution is inadequate to capture the morphology of convection on large scales. This shows that the role of dimensionality is secondary to correctly accounting for the basic physics of the explosion. We also analyze information provided by particle tracers embedded in the flow and find that the unbound material has relatively long residency times in 2D models, while in 3D a significant fraction of the explosion energy is carried by particles with relatively short residency times. © 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved..


Roth W.J.,J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry | Roth W.J.,Jagiellonian University | Nachtigall P.,Charles University | Morris R.E.,University of St. Andrews | Cejka J.,J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2014

Zeolites are well-known as valuable crystalline solids with framework structures containing discrete micropores of molecular dimensions that accommodate exchangeable extra-framework cation sites. Lamellar zeolites combine useful benefits of both classes, high catalytic activity, microporosity, thermal stability, and chemical resistance of zeolites with structural flexibility of 2D solids, enabling their postsynthetic modification, both structural and compositional. The main category of 2D zeolites is the layered precursors, which are viewed as primary forms because they are the starting materials for further modifications. The various modifications may be an end product (IEZ-stabilized) or they may be further modifiable, like intercalated and swollen derivatives. Synthesis method, either via direct synthesis or by postsynthetic modification, is another criterion for classifying layered zeolite materials. New precursors can also be obtained from a regular zeolite by selective chemical degradation.


Odrzywolek A.,Jagiellonian University | Plewa T.,Florida State University
Astronomy and Astrophysics | Year: 2011

Aims. We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods. We calculate the neutrino flux from β processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results. Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allows an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons 55Co and 56Ni) and numerous β-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions. While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories. © 2011 ESO.


Akemann G.,Bielefeld University | Burda Z.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical | Year: 2012

We consider the product of n complex non-Hermitian, independent random matrices, each of size N × N with independent identically distributed Gaussian entries (Ginibre matrices). The joint probability distribution of the complex eigenvalues of the product matrix is found to be given by a determinantal point process as in the case of a single Ginibre matrix, but with a more complicated weight given by a Meijer G-function depending on n. Using the method of orthogonal polynomials we compute all eigenvalue density correlation functions exactly for finite N and fixed n. They are given by the determinant of the corresponding kernel which we construct explicitly. In the large-N limit at fixed n we first determine the microscopic correlation functions in the bulk and at the edge of the spectrum. After unfolding they are identical to that of the Ginibre ensemble with n = 1 and thus universal. In contrast the microscopic correlations we find at the origin differ for each n > 1 and generalize the known Bessel law in the complex plane for n = 2 to a new hypergeometric kernel 0F n-1. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Barto L.,Charles University | Kozik M.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of the ACM | Year: 2014

We prove that constraint satisfaction problems without the ability to count are solvable by the local consistency checking algorithm. This settles three (equivalent) conjectures: Feder-Vardi [SICOMP'98], Bulatov [LICS'04] and Larose-Zádori [AU'07]. © 2014 ACM.


Chmielnicki W.,Jagiellonian University | Stacpor K.,Silesian University of Technology
Neurocomputing | Year: 2012

There are two standard approaches to the classification task: generative, which use training data to estimate a probability model for each class, and discriminative, which try to construct flexible decision boundaries between the classes. An ideal classifier should combine these two approaches. In this paper a classifier combining the well-known support vector machine (SVM) classifier with regularized discriminant analysis (RDA) classifier is presented. The hybrid classifier is used for protein structure prediction which is one of the most important goals pursued by bioinformatics. The obtained results are promising, the hybrid classifier achieves better result than the SVM or RDA classifiers alone. The proposed method achieves higher recognition ratio than other methods described in the literature. © 2011 Elsevier B.V..


Krafts K.,University of Minnesota | Hempelmann E.,University of Witwatersrand | Skorska-Stania A.,Jagiellonian University
Parasitology Research | Year: 2012

Malarial treatment is widely and readily available today. However, there was a time in the not-so-distant past when malaria was a deadly disease with no known cause or cure. In this article, we trace the origins of an antimalarial therapy from the discovery of the nature of the malarial parasite through the development of chloroquine. We dedicate this article to Johann "Hans" Andersag, the scientist who developed chloroquine, on the 110th anniversary of his birth, 16 February 1902. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Hrycyna O.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Szydlowski M.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2013

The dynamics of the Brans-Dicke theory with a scalar field potential function is investigated. We show that the system with a barotropic matter content can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system. For an arbitrary potential function, we found the values of the Brans-Dicke parameter for which a global attractor in the phase space representing the de Sitter state exists. Using linearized solutions in the vicinity of this critical point, we show that the evolution of the Universe mimics the ΛCDM model. From the recent Planck satellite data, we obtain constraints on the variability of the effective gravitational coupling constant as well as the lower limit of the mass of the Brans-Dicke scalar field at the de Sitter state. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Meier B.,University of Bern | Kalesan B.,University of Bern | Mattle H.P.,University of Bern | Khattab A.A.,University of Bern | And 9 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: The options for secondary prevention of cryptogenic embolism in patients with patent foramen ovale are administration of antithrombotic medications or percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale. We investigated whether closure is superior to medical therapy. Methods: We performed a multicenter, superiority trial in 29 centers in Europe, Canada, Brazil, and Australia in which the assessors of end points were unaware of the study-group assignments. Patients with a patent foramen ovale and ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or a peripheral thromboembolic event were randomly assigned to undergo closure of the patent foramen ovale with the Amplatzer PFO Occluder or to receive medical therapy. The primary end point was a composite of death, nonfatal stroke, TIA, or peripheral embolism. Analysis was performed on data for the intention-to-treat population. Results: The mean duration of follow-up was 4.1 years in the closure group and 4.0 years in the medical-therapy group. The primary end point occurred in 7 of the 204 patients (3.4%) in the closure group and in 11 of the 210 patients (5.2%) in the medicaltherapy group (hazard ratio for closure vs. medical therapy, 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24 to 1.62; P = 0.34). Nonfatal stroke occurred in 1 patient (0.5%) in the closure group and 5 patients (2.4%) in the medical-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.02 to 1.72; P = 0.14), and TIA occurred in 5 patients (2.5%) and 7 patients (3.3%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.23 to 2.24; P = 0.56). Conclusions: Closure of a patent foramen ovale for secondary prevention of cryptogenic embolism did not result in a significant reduction in the risk of recurrent embolic events or death as compared with medical therapy. Copyright © 2013 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Kowal G.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Kowal G.,Jagiellonian University | Kowal G.,University of Sao Paulo | Lazarian A.,University of Wisconsin - Madison
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2010

We study compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, which holds the key to many astrophysical processes, including star formation and cosmic-ray propagation. To account for the variations of the magnetic field in the strongly turbulent fluid, we use wavelet decomposition of the turbulent velocity field into Alfvén, slow, and fast modes, which presents an extension of the Cho & Lazarian decomposition approach based on Fourier transforms. The wavelets allow us to follow the variations of the local direction of the magnetic field and therefore improve the quality of the decomposition compared to the Fourier transforms, which are done in the mean field reference frame. For each resulting component, we calculate the spectra and two-point statistics such as longitudinal and transverse structure functions as well as higher order intermittency statistics. In addition, we perform a Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition of the velocity field into incompressible and compressible parts and analyze these components. We find that the turbulence intermittency is different for different components, and we show that the intermittency statistics depend on whether the phenomenon was studied in the global reference frame related to the mean magnetic field or in the frame defined by the local magnetic field. The dependencies of the measures we obtained are different for different components of the velocity; for instance, we show that while the Alfvén mode intermittency changes marginally with the Mach number, the intermittency of the fast mode is substantially affected by the change. © 2010. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.


Heller M.P.,University of Amsterdam | Heller M.P.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Janik R.A.,Jagiellonian University | Witaszczyk P.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2012

This article studies a numerical relativity approach to the initial value problem in Anti-de Sitter spacetime relevant for dual nonequilibrium evolution of strongly coupled non-Abelian plasma undergoing Bjorken expansion. In order to use initial conditions for the metric obtained in we introduce new, ADM formalism-based scheme for numerical integration of Einstein's equations with negative cosmological constant. The key novel element of this approach is the choice of lapse function vanishing at fixed radial position, enabling, if needed, efficient horizon excision. Various physical aspects of the gauge theory thermalization process in this setup have been outlined in our companion article. In this work we focus on the gravitational side of the problem and present full technical details of our setup. We discuss, in particular, the ADM formalism, the explicit form of initial states, the boundary conditions for the metric on the inner and outer edges of the simulation domain, the relation between boundary and bulk notions of time, the procedure to extract the gauge theory energy-momentum tensor and nonequilibrium apparent horizon entropy, as well as the choice of point for freezing the lapse. Finally, we comment on various features of the initial profiles we consider. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Barto L.,McMaster University | Barto L.,Charles University | Kozik M.,Jagiellonian University
Proceedings of the Annual ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing | Year: 2012

An algorithm for a constraint satisfaction problem is called robust if it outputs an assignment satisfying at least (1-g(ε))-fraction of the constraints given a (1-ε)-satisfiable instance, where g(ε) → 0 as ε → 0, g(0)=0. Guruswami and Zhou conjectured a characterization of constraint languages for which the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem admits an efficient robust algorithm. This paper confirms their conjecture. © 2012 ACM.


Onuma Y.,Erasmus Medical Center | Dudek D.,Jagiellonian University | Thuesen L.,Aarhus University Hospital | Webster M.,Aarhus University Hospital | And 4 more authors.
JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions | Year: 2013

Objectives This study sought to demonstrate the 5-year clinical and functional multislice computed tomography angiographic results after implantation of the fully resorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold (Absorb BVS, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California). Background Multimodality imaging of the first-in-humans trial using a ABSORB BVS scaffold demonstrated at 2 years the bioresorption of the device while preventing restenosis. However, the long-term safety and efficacy of this therapy remain to be documented. Methods In the ABSORB cohort A trial (ABSORB Clinical Investigation, Cohort A [ABSORB A] Everolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent System Clinical Investigation), 30 patients with a single de novo coronary artery lesion were treated with the fully resorbable everolimus-eluting Absorb scaffold at 4 centers. As an optional investigation in 3 of the 4 centers, the patients underwent multislice computed tomography (MSCT) angiography at 18 months and 5 years. Acquired MSCT data were analyzed at an independent core laboratory (Cardialysis, Rotterdam, the Netherlands) for quantitative analysis of lumen dimensions and was further processed for calculation of fractional flow reserve (FFR) at another independent core laboratory (Heart Flow, Redwood City, California). Results Five-year clinical follow-up is available for 29 patients. One patient withdrew consent after 6 months, but the vital status of this patient remains available. At 46 days, 1 patient experienced a single episode of chest pain and underwent a target lesion revascularization with a slight troponin increase after the procedure. At 5 years, the ischemia-driven major adverse cardiac event rate of 3.4% remained unchanged. Clopidogrel was discontinued in all but 1 patient. Scaffold thrombosis was not observed in any patient. Two noncardiac deaths were reported, 1 caused by duodenal perforation and the other from Hodgkin's disease. At 5 years, 18 patients underwent MSCT angiography. All scaffolds were patent, with a median minimal lumen area of 3.25 mm2 (interquartile range: 2.20 to 4.30). Noninvasive FFR analysis was feasible in 13 of 18 scans, which yielded a median distal FFR of 0.86 (interquartile range: 0.82 to 0.94). Conclusions The low event rate at 5 years suggests sustained safety after the implantation of a fully bioresorbable Absorb everolimus-eluting scaffold. Noninvasive assessment of the coronary artery with an option of functional assessment could be an alternative to invasive imaging after treatment of coronary narrowing with such a polymeric bioresorbable scaffold. (ABSORB Clinical Investigation, Cohort A [ABSORB A] Everolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent System Clinical Investigation [ABSORB]; NCT00300131) © 2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.


Barto L.,Charles University | Kozik M.,Jagiellonian University
Proceedings - Symposium on Logic in Computer Science | Year: 2010

We provide two new characterizations for finitely generated varieties with Taylor terms. The first characterization is using "absorbing sets" and the second one "cyclic operations". These new conditions allow us to reprove the conjecture of Bang-Jensen and Hell (proved by the authors, comp. STOC'08, SICOMP'09) and the characterization of locally finite Taylor varieties using weak near-unanimity operations (proved by McKenzie and Maroti, Alg.Univ. 2009) in an elementary and self-contained way. The research is closely connected to the algebraic approach to CSP and previous results obtained by authors using similar tools [comp. STOC'08, SICOMP'09, FOCS'09 etc.]. © 2010 IEEE.


Mielczarek J.,Jagiellonian University | Mielczarek J.,National Center for Nuclear Research
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2013

The state of asymptotic silence, characterized by causal disconnection of the space points, emerges from various approaches aiming to describe gravitational phenomena in the limit of large curvatures. In particular, such behavior was anticipated by Belinsky, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL) in their famous conjecture put forward in the early seventies of the last century. While the BKL conjecture is based on purely classical considerations, one can expect that asymptotic silence should have its quantum counterpart at the level of a more fundamental theory of quantum gravity, which is the relevant description of gravitational phenomena in the limit of large energy densities. Here, we summarize some recent results which give support to such a possibility. More precisely, we discuss occurrence of the asymptotic silence due to polymerization of space at the Planck scale, in the framework of loop quantum cosmology. In the discussed model, the state of asymptotic silence is realized at the energy density ρ=ρc/2, where ρc is the maximal allowed energy density, being of the order of the Planck energy density. At energy densities ρ>ρc/2, the universe becomes 4D Euclidean space without causal structure. Therefore, the asymptotic silence appears to be an intermediate state of space between the Lorentzian and Euclidean phases. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.


Adam C.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Sanchez-Guillen J.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Sanchez-Guillen J.,University of Zaragoza | Wereszczynski A.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2010

Within the class of field theories with the field content of the Skyrme model, one submodel can be found which consists of the square of the baryon current and a potential term only. For this submodel, a Bogomol'nyi-Prasad- Sommerfield bound exists, and the static soliton solutions saturate this bound. Further, already on the classical level, this Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model reproduces some features of the liquid drop model of nuclei. Here, we investigate the model in more detail and, besides, we perform the rigid rotor quantization of the simplest Skyrmion (the nucleon). In addition, we discuss indications that the viability of the model as a low-energy effective field theory for QCD is further improved in the limit of a large number of colors Nc. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Zenginoglu A.,Jagiellonian University | Kidder L.E.,Cornell University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2010

We present the numerical implementation of a clean solution to the outer boundary and radiation extraction problems within the 3+1 formalism for hyperbolic partial differential equations on a given background. Our approach is based on compactification at null infinity in hyperboloidal scri fixing coordinates. We report numerical tests for the particular example of a scalar wave equation on Minkowski and Schwarzschild backgrounds. We address issues related to the implementation of the hyperboloidal approach for the Einstein equations, such as nonlinear source functions, matching, and evaluation of formally singular terms at null infinity. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Caputa P.,University of Witwatersrand | Jejjala V.,University of Witwatersrand | Soltanpanahi H.,University of Witwatersrand | Soltanpanahi H.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2014

In this paper, we use entanglement entropy as a tool to explore the universal properties of conformal field theories (CFTs) dual to extremal BTZ black holes. We demonstrate that the entanglement entropies computed in the CFTs at the boundary of the extremal BTZ and the boundary of the near-horizon limit of the extremal BTZ are in perfect agreement and have the form appropriate to a two-dimensional CFT with only the chiral part excited and the antichiral in the ground state. Furthermore, we analyze the universal limits of the entanglement entropy and recover the correct value of the thermal entropy for large entangling intervals and the first-law-like relation for the small interval. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Giataganas D.,National Technical University of Athens | Soltanpanahi H.,Jagiellonian University | Soltanpanahi H.,University of Witwatersrand
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2014

We show that in generic isotropic holographic theories the longitudinal Langevin diffusion coefficient along the string motion is larger compared to that of the transverse direction. We argue that this is in general a universal relation and we derive the generic conditions in order to be satisfied. A way to violate the relation is to consider anisotropic gauge/gravity dualities. We give an explicit example of this violation where the noise along the transverse direction is larger than the noise occurring along the quark motion. Moreover, we derive the effective world-sheet temperature for any generic theory and then the conditions for negative excess noise. We argue that isotropic theories cannot have negative excess noise, and we additionally remark that these conditions are difficult to get satisfied, indicating positivity of the excess noise even in a large class of anisotropic holographic theories, implying a strong universal property. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: ENV.2009.5.1.0.2 | Award Amount: 896.04K | Year: 2009

The goal of mountain.TRIP is to provide stakeholders, end-users and practitioners with readily accessible and understandable forms of research-based information relevant to sustainable development in mountain regions. Mountain.TRIP will start where other EU projects have finished, translating research findings into useful information and developing relationships between users and researchers. EU research projects generally focus on elucidating truths, not on communicating these truths to practitioners or the interested public. Research projects often produce valuable results, methods, tools and instruments, but at the end of the project neither time nor money remains to disseminate these results among practitioners and to the interested public. Furthermore, research results usually exist in forms recognized by the research community but not easily or quickly assimilated by communities of practice. Mountain.TRIP will close the gap that currently exists between EU project findings and the needs of policy- and decision-makers, stakeholders in economy and environment, planners and administrators, non governmental organisations, end-users, and other members of groups representing the interests of citizens and industry of the most important mountain regions of Europe, hereafter referred to in this proposal as practitioners. Mountain.TRIP will not just disseminate research results but will rather synthesize results from multiple EU projects while adapting the format of that synthesis through continuous interaction with practitioners to meet their needs. The project uses multiple innovative mechanisms to ensure effective interaction with practitioners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES | Award Amount: 304.20K | Year: 2013

The NEUREN project is based on an interdisciplinary consortium of 14 laboratories from 4 EU countries (France, Italy, Spain, Poland), 3 industrialized countries (Australia, Canada, USA) and 3 Mediterranean countries (Egypt, Morocco, Lebanon). It covers a large scope of Neuroscience research topics from molecules to integrated physiology, associate basic, translational, and clinical research, from bench to bedside. EU institutions all share similar basic competences but they show significant complementarities to cover all aspects of Neuroscience. Third countries partners bring their own technical and conceptual expertise to build a consortium of excellence, taking advantage of previous collaborations to exploit existing complementary expertise and synergy between the partners. Given the complexity of neurobiological processes, and the broad range of methodological approaches, it is absolutely necessary to develop multi-sites integrated research projects. Therefore, 6 multi-sites projects have been elaborated, using staff exchange as a tool to develop research collaborations. Pain sensitization in the spinal cord (Bordeaux, Alexandria, Melbourne, Laval, Turin) Experimental models for neurological disorders (Turin, Marrakech, Alexandria, NY) Systems neurobiology of neurological disorders (Valence, Tetuan, Krakow, Melbourne) Cognitive impairment and neuronal dynamics (Marseille, Alexandria, Marrakech) Dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex and trait anxiety (Nice, Marrakech) Medical imaging of neurological disorders (Bordeaux, Laval, Beirut) Such consortium will highly support the current efforts to reach outstanding international research standards. It will contribute to develop poles of technical and scientific excellence that will become the reference for the South Mediterranean area. Northern institutions will fully benefit from this integration to further diversify their technical expertise and to aggregate powerful teams of well-trained researchers.


Gaweda L.,Medical University of Warsaw | Prochwicz K.,Jagiellonian University
European Psychiatry | Year: 2015

Background: The role of psychosis-related cognitive biases (e.g. jumping to conclusions) in a delusion continuum is well-established. Little is known about the role of types of cognitive biases. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of psychosis-related and "Beckian" (i.e. anxiety- and depression-related) cognitive biases assessed with a clinical questionnaire in the delusion continuum and its dimensions. Methods: Schizophrenia patients with (n=57) and without (n=35) delusions were compared to healthy subjects who had a low (n=53) and high (n=57) level of delusion-like experiences (DLEs) on the Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for Psychosis (CBQp). Delusion dimensions in the clinical sample were assessed with the semi-structured interview PSYRATS. DLEs were measured with the Peters Delusion Inventory (PDI). Results: High DLEs participants scored significantly higher than low DLEs, and patients with delusions scored higher than patients without delusions on the total scores of the CBQp. High DLEs participants scored significantly higher than low DLEs on catastrophisation and JTC. Schizophrenia patients with delusions scored significantly higher when compared to patients without delusions on intentionalising, dichotomous thinking, JTC and emotional reasoning. Patients with delusions and high DLEs participants scored similarly on JTC. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that catastrophising predicted total severity of clinical delusions and JTC predicted the cognitive dimension of clinical delusions. Both JTC and catastrophisation predicted the frequency and conviction associated with DLEs. Conclusions: Both "Beckian" and psychosis-related cognitive biases may underlie delusions. Different aspects of clinical delusions and delusion-like experiences may be related to different cognitive biases. © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Chaloupka J.,Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research | Chaloupka J.,Masaryk University | Oles A.M.,Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research | Oles A.M.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2011

We investigate the ground state of the d1 spin-orbital model for triply degenerate t2g orbitals on a triangular lattice that unifies intrinsic frustration of spin and orbital interactions with geometrical frustration. Using full or Lanczos exact diagonalization of finite clusters, we establish that the ground state of the spin-orbital model that interpolates between superexchange and direct exchange interactions on the bonds is characterized by valence-bond correlations. In the absence of Hund's exchange the model describes a competition between various possible valence-bond states. By considering the clusters with open boundary conditions we demonstrate that orbital interactions are always frustrated, but this frustration is removed by pronounced spin singlet correlations that coexist with dimer orbital correlations supporting them. Such local configurations contribute to the disordered ground states found for the clusters with periodic boundary conditions that interpolate between a highly resonating, dimer-based, entangled spin-orbital liquid phase and a valence-bond state with completely static spin-singlet states. We argue that these states are also realized for the infinite lattice and anticipate that pronounced transitions between different regimes found for particular geometries will turn out to smooth crossovers in the properties of the spin-orbital liquid in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we provide evidence that the resonating spin-orbital liquid phase involves entangled states on the bonds. In such a phase classical considerations based on the mean-field theory cannot be used, spin exchange interactions do not determine spin bond correlations, and quantum fluctuations play a crucial role in the ground states and magnetic transitions. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Undas A.,Jagiellonian University | Undas A.,John Paul II Hospital
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis | Year: 2016

Fibrin formed from fibrinogen is the main component of thrombi. Clot structure is characterized by fiber thickness and pore size, which differs within a given clot and between individuals. Plasma clot architecture is largely determined by the quantity and quality of fibrinogen. Plasma fibrinogen concentrations are most commonly measured in citrated plasma using the Clauss method. However, several factors, including instrument type and reagent, may affect results. Other approaches to express the ability of fibrinogen to clot involve prothrombin time-derived or clottable protein assays, while fibrinogen antigen levels in clinical settings are measured using immunological or precipitation assays. Fibrin clot permeability (reflected by the Darcy constant, K s) being proportional to a buffer volume percolating through a clot under a given hydrostatic pressure is now the most commonly used measure of clot structure. Low K s values indicating tightly packed fibrin structure have been shown to be associated with venous and arterial thrombotic complications, while high K s might contribute to bleeding disorders. The measurement of K s, however, is not standardized and validated. This review summarizes the current knowledge on practical aspects of the measurement of fibrinogen levels and K s in patients. © 2016 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.


Lezanska M.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | Pietrzyk P.,Jagiellonian University | Sojka Z.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of Physical Chemistry C | Year: 2010

Mesoporous silica matrixes (SBA-15) and multilamellar vesicular (MLV) structures have been used for preparation of their nitrogen-containing carbon replicas from a pyrrole precursor. The materials have been characterized with microscopic (TEM), spectroscopic (XPS, Raman, EPR), and sorption techniques. The obtained data show that the resultant CMK-3 and OCM-0.75 replicas exhibit well-developed structures of organized graphene layers, which include surface nitrogen groups located on the graphene sheets and their edges. Influence of the siliceous template loading with FeCl 3 on the microstructure of the carbons and speciation of nitrogen has been studied. The built-in nitrogen appears in various surface functional groups that have been identified and quantified with XPS. These groups play a significant role in functionalization of the carbons toward enhanced sorption capacity. The number of paramagnetic defects has been related to the preparation stage of a carbon replica as well as to the chemical status of the heteroatom. A simple model of the surface structure of the materials, based on the spectroscopic data, has been developed. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Undas A.,Jagiellonian University | Undas A.,John Paul II Hospital | Ariens R.A.S.,University of Leeds
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology | Year: 2011

The formation of fibrin clots that are relatively resistant to lysis represents the final step in blood coagulation. We discuss the genetic and environmental regulators of fibrin structure in relation to thrombotic disease. In addition, we discuss the implications of fibrin structure for treatment of thrombosis. Fibrin clots composed of compact, highly branched networks with thin fibers are resistant to lysis. Altered fibrin structure has consistently been reported in patients with several diseases complicated by thromboembolic events, including patients with acute or prior myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and venous thromboembolism. Relatives of patients with myocardial infarction or venous thromboembolism display similar fibrin abnormalities. Low-dose aspirin, statins, lowering of homocysteine, better diabetes control, smoking cessation, and suppression of inflammatory response increase clot permeability and susceptibility to lysis. Growing evidence indicates that abnormal fibrin properties represent a novel risk factor for arterial and venous thrombotic events, particularly of unknown etiology in young and middle-aged patients. © 2011 American Heart Association, Inc.


Hoffmann N.A.,Structural and Computational Biology Unit | Jakobi A.J.,Structural and Computational Biology Unit | Jakobi A.J.,Hamburg Unit | Moreno-Morcillo M.,Structural and Computational Biology Unit | And 7 more authors.
Nature | Year: 2015

Transcription of genes encoding small structured RNAs such as transfer RNAs, spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA and ribosomal 5S RNA is carried out by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), the largest yet structurally least characterized eukaryotic RNA polymerase. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structures of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol III elongating complex at 3.9 Å resolution and the apo Pol III enzyme in two different conformations at 4.6 and 4.7 Å resolution, respectively, which allow the building of a 17-subunit atomic model of Pol III. The reconstructions reveal the precise orientation of the C82-C34-C31 heterotrimer in close proximity to the stalk. The C53-C37 heterodimer positions residues involved in transcription termination close to the non-template DNA strand. In the apo Pol III structures, the stalk adopts different orientations coupled with closed and open conformations of the clamp. Our results provide novel insights into Pol III-specific transcription and the adaptation of Pol III towards its small transcriptional targets. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Konieczynska M.,John Paul II Hospital | Fil K.,John Paul II Hospital | Bazanek M.,John Paul II Hospital | Undas A.,Jagiellonian University
Thrombosis and Haemostasis | Year: 2014

It has been shown that type 2 diabetes (DM) is associated with enhanced thrombin generation and formation of denser fibrin clots of reduced lysability. We sought to investigate the impact of diabetes duration versus glycaemia control on fibrin clot phenotype and its determinants in type 2 diabetic patients. In 156 consecutive Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes we investigated ex vivo thrombin generation, fibrinolytic proteins, along with plasma fibrin clot permeation (Ks), compaction, turbidity, and efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-mediated fibrinolysis. Patients with longer diabetes duration (>5 years, median; n=68) had higher peak thrombin generation (+16.3%, p<0.001), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen (+14.8%, p=0.001), t-PA antigen (+13.9%, p=0.002) compared with those with duration ≤5 years (n=88). No such differences were observed between patients with inadequate glycaemic control, defined as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) >6.5% (48 mmol/mol) (n=77), versus those with HbA1C≤6.5% (n=79). Fibrinogen, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor antigen, plasminogen and soluble thrombomodulin were unaffected by disease duration or glycaemia control. Lower clot permeability, longer clot lysis, and higher maximum D-dimer levels released from clots (all p<0.05 after adjustment for fibrinogen, age, body mass index, insulin, acetylsalicylic acid treatment, and HbA1c or diabetes duration) were also observed in patients with diabetes duration >5 years and those with HbA1C>6.5%. We conclude that prolonged duration of type 2 diabetes is associated with increased thrombin formation, hypofibrinolysis, and prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype. The impact of disease duration on coagulation is different and stronger than that observed during inadequate glycaemia control. © Schattauer 2014.


Michorczyk P.,Cracow University of Technology | Pietrzyk P.,Jagiellonian University | Ogonowski J.,Cracow University of Technology
Microporous and Mesoporous Materials | Year: 2012

A series of Crx/SBA-1 cubic mesoporous catalysts with 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 wt.% content of Cr (Cr total) were obtained by incipient wetness impregnation of SBA-1. The obtained catalysts were characterized with various physicochemical techniques (chemical composition, low-temperature adsorption of N 2, H 2-TPR, XRD, UV-vis DRS, Raman, and EPR) and tested in dehydrogenation of propane to propene in the presence of CO 2. Various chromium species including Cr 6+, dispersed Cr 5+, and crystalline Cr 2O 3 were found in the calcined Crx/SBA-1 samples. Cr 6+ species were present mainly in the form of mono- and dichromates, despite the Cr loading. The presence of dispersed Cr 5+ species and crystalline α-Cr 2O 3 in the calcined catalysts depended on the total Cr total content. Cr 5+ species were found in the samples containing below 7 wt.% of Cr total, while particles of crystalline α-Cr 2O 3 were detected in the catalyst with Cr total content above 5 wt.%. All of the Crx/SBA-1 catalysts exhibited excellent catalytic activity and high selectivity in the dehydrogenation of propane to propene in the presence of CO 2 with the maximum propane conversion (37.7% at 550 °C) for ∼7 wt.% of Cr total. For higher Cr contents the conversion of propane remained almost constant which was connected with the formation of crystalline Cr 2O 3 which was inactive in the test reaction. Operando UV-vis DRS measurements performed during the dehydrogenation of propane, both in the presence and absence of CO 2 at 550 °C, indicated that the Cr 6+ species (main redox sites) were reduced rapidly to Cr 2+/Cr 3+ species already at the beginning of the process. The dispersed Cr 2+/Cr 3+ ions were the main sites available to the reactants under the dehydrogenation conditions in all of the studied feed compositions. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


De Silva P.,University of Geneva | De Silva P.,Jagiellonian University | Wesolowski T.A.,University of Geneva
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2012

Within the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) approximation, one can distinguish two different Kohn-Sham potentials. One is the potential available numerically in calculations, and the other is the exact potential corresponding to the LCAO density. The latter is usually not available, but can be obtained from the total density by a numerical inversion procedure or, as is done here, analytically using only one LCAO Kohn-Sham orbital. In the complete basis-set limit, the lowest-lying Kohn-Sham orbital suffices to perform the analytical inversion, and the two potentials differ by no more than a constant. The relation between these two potentials is investigated here for diatomic molecules and several atomic basis sets of increasing size and quality. The differences between the two potentials are usually qualitative (wrong behavior at nuclear cusps and far from the molecule even if Slater-type orbitals are used) and δ-like features at nodal planes of the lowest-lying LCAO Kohn-Sham orbital. Such nodes occur frequently in LCAO calculations and are not physical. Whereas the behavior of the potential can be systematically improved locally by the increase of the basis sets, the occurrence of nodes is not correlated with the size of the basis set. The presence of nodes in the lowest-lying LCAO orbital can be used to monitor whether the effective potential in LCAO Kohn-Sham equations can be interpreted as the potential needed for pure-state noninteracting v-representability of the LCAO density. Squares of such node-containing lowest-lying LCAO Kohn-Sham orbitals are nontrivial examples of two-electron densities which are not pure-state noninteracting v-representable. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Gajos G.,John Paul II Hospital | Rostoff P.,John Paul II Hospital | Undas A.,Jagiellonian University | Piwowarska W.,John Paul II Hospital | Piwowarska W.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2010

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are able to modify platelet responsiveness to dual antiplatelet therapy in stable coronary artery disease patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background: Although previous studies have suggested antiplatelet properties of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, it is unknown whether they can enhance platelet inhibition on standard aspirin and clopidogrel treatment. Methods: The OMEGA-PCI (OMEGA-3 Fatty Acids After PCI to Modify Responsiveness to Dual Antiplatelet Therapy) study was an investigator-initiated, prospective, single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study. Patients receiving standard dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin 75 mg/day and clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose followed by 75 mg/day) were randomly assigned to receive the addition of 1 g of omega-3 ethyl esters (n = 33) or placebo (n = 30) for 1 month. Platelet function was measured serially by light transmission aggregometry (adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid [AA] were used as agonists) and assessment of the phosphorylation status of the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein at baseline, 12 h, 3 to 5 days, and 30 days after randomization. Results: The P2Y12 reactivity index was significantly lower, by 22.2%, after 1 month of treatment with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with placebo when used in addition to dual antiplatelet therapy (p = 0.020). Maximal platelet aggregation induced by 5 and 20 μmol/l adenosine diphosphate was lower by 13.3% (p = 0.026) and 9.8% (p = 0.029), respectively, after 1 month of treatment with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with placebo. Platelet aggregation after AA stimulation was low and did not change significantly throughout the study. There were no cases of aspirin resistance during follow-up that was suggestive of good compliance with the medication. Conclusions: The addition of omega-3 ethyl esters to the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel significantly potentiates platelet response to clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention. © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation.


De Silva P.,University of Geneva | Korchowiec J.,Jagiellonian University | Wesolowski T.A.,University of Geneva
ChemPhysChem | Year: 2012

We introduce a new tool (single exponential decay detector: SEDD) to extract information about bonding and localization in atoms, molecules, or molecular assemblies. The practical evaluation of SEDD does not require any explicit information about the orbitals. The only quantity needed is the electron density (calculated or experimental) and its derivatives up to the second order. A new tool, the single exponential decay detector (SEDD) is introduced to extract information about bonding and localization in atoms, molecules, or molecular assemblies. The practical evaluation of SEDD does not require any explicit information about the orbitals. The only quantity needed is the electron density (calculated or experimental) and its derivatives up to the second order (see graphic). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Ciesla M.,Jagiellonian University | Karbowniczek P.,Cracow University of Technology
Physical Review E - Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics | Year: 2015

Random packing of surfaceless starlike particles built of 3 to 50 line segments was studied using random sequential adsorption algorithm. Numerical simulations allow us to determine saturated packing densities as well as the first two virial expansion coefficients for such objects. Measured kinetics of the packing growth supports the power law known to be valid for particles with a finite surface; however, the dependence of the exponent in this law on the number of star arms is unexpected. The density autocorrelation function shows fast superexponential decay as for disks, but the typical distance between closest stars is much smaller than between disks of the similar size, especially for a small number of arms. © 2015 American Physical Society.


Skrzypczak-Pietraszek E.,Jagiellonian University | Pietraszek J.,Cracow University of Technology
Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis | Year: 2012

Melittis melissophyllum L. is an old medicinal plant. Nowadays it is only used in the folk medicine but formerly it has been applied in the official medicine as a natural product described in French Pharmacopoeia. M. melissophyllum herbs used in our studies were collected from two localities in Poland in May and September. Methanolic plant extracts were purified by means of solid-phase extraction and then analysed by HPLC-DAD for their phenolic acid profile. Eleven compounds were identified in all plant samples and quantitatively analysed as: protocatechuic, chlorogenic, p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic, caffeic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic, o-coumaric and cinnamic acid. Plant materials contained free and bound phenolic acids. The main compounds were: p-hydroxybenzoic acid (30.21-54.16. mg/100. g dw and 37.04-56.75. mg/100. g dw, free and bound, respectively) and p-coumaric acid (40.48-80.55. mg/100. g dw and 28.09-40.85. mg/100. g dw, free and bound, respectively). The highest amounts of the investigated compounds were found in all samples collected in September, e.g. p-hydroxybenzoic acid (September 51.72-54.16. mg/100. g dw vs. May 30.21-34.07. mg/100. g dw), p-coumaric acid (September 77.14-80.55. mg/100. g dw vs. May 40.48-43.25. mg/100. g dw). Multivariate statistical and data mining techniques, such as cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to characterize the sample populations according to the geographical localities, vegetation period and compound form (free or bound). To the best of our knowledge we report for the first time the results of quantitative analysis of M. melissophyllum phenolic acids and seasonal variation of their content. Plant herbs are usually collected at flowering for plant derived medical preparations. Our results show that it is not always the optimal time for the highest contents of active compounds. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 201.40K | Year: 2014

Competition between phases occurring in solid-state reactions in metallic nanosystems is of critical importance in advanced materials technologies. The present Project focuses on materials already being used or are being considered as candidates for application in advanced joining technologies. The principal goals of application are: (i) to tune interface reactions in nano-structured Ni/Al, Ti/Al and Cu/Sn systems and (ii) to determine the thermodynamic driving forces and activation energies (i.e. the kinetic barriers) for interfacial segregation and grain-boundary wetting in binary alloys (Ag-Cu, Al-Si and Al-Cu). By developing the understanding of basic physical and chemical background of the phenomena the Project will focus on : (i) experimental investigations of dynamic atomic diffusion at nanocrystal facets and variable interfaces at low and high temperatures (in ultrafast laser-induced surface quasi-liquid and liquid layers) in silver nanoparticles and nanowires with reference to the melting process; (ii) analytical modelling and atomistic simulation of interdiffusion processes accompanying intermediate phase formation in nano-film couples; (iii) analytical (mean-field-based) modeling of ordering and Kirkendall voiding in solid-solution and intermetallic phases and (iv) development of modeling of nanoscale structural transformations in solids at different temperatures using ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) methods, atomistic simulation techniques (Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics) and the phase field crystal method. Apart from the realization of particular research task, the networking between the project participants will aim at integration of the research capacities and creation of a new powerful and very efficient international scientific milieu.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.5-6 | Award Amount: 4.02M | Year: 2008

COPD is the only chronic disease with an increasing mortality and it will constitute the 4th leading cause of death by 2035 world wide. To alleviate the burden of COPD an accurate and easy diagnosis in the early stages of COPD needs to be developed. Many studies strongly suggest that there is an individual genetic susceptibility to COPD: only 10-15% of all smokers develop COPD. In another study, 53% of subjects had mild and 13.3% severe emphysema. When that genetic susceptibility becomes known, new diagnostics and a better insight into the pathogenesis of COPD will become available. Treatment or prevention come into reach. Several studies have elucidated a low number of significant genetic differences obtained via the candidate gene approach: a better approach is a genome wide scan. The results of such a genome wide scan will be compared between smokers with and without COPD. This approach has proven itself in e.g. diabetes mellitus. Data show that diagnosing COPD by only using pulmonary function tests, will only pick up a minority of the patients with emphysema. So, a diagnostic bias is often present, but avoided in the current study: it is the first time that data on CT scans and pulmonary function are combined for an accurate diagnosis. We will carry out a 300.000 SNP genome wide scan in a 4000 male heavy smokers with and without COPD. The diagnosis of COPD is based on using pulmonary function tests and CT-scanning. A replication study with the ~3,000 most significant SNPs will be performed in 5 European replication cohorts to remove false positives findings, study sex influences, population stratification and disease severity. We will also investigate gene expression in peripheral blood of smokers with and without COPD. The gene expression data will assist in SNP selection. We will build COPD prediction models based on the significant SNPs from the replication studies and validate the rule in all avalable cohorts


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: NMP.2012.2.2-6 | Award Amount: 4.88M | Year: 2013

The project 4G-PHOTOCAT allies the expertise of 7 academic and 3 industrial partners from 5 EU countries (Germany, United Kingdom, Czech Republic, Poland, and Finland) and 2 ASEAN countries (Malaysia and Vietnam) for the development of a novel generation of low-cost nano-engineered photocatalysts for sunlight-driven water depollution. Through rational design of composites in which the solar light-absorbing semiconductors are coupled to nanostructured redox co-catalysts based on abundant elements, the recombination of photogenerated charges will be suppressed and the rate of photocatalytic reactions will be maximized. In order to achieve fabrication of optimal architectures, advanced chemical deposition techniques with a high degree of control over composition and morphology will be employed and further developed. Furthermore, novel protocols will be developed for the implementation of the photocatalysts into a liquid paint, allowing for the deposition of robust photoactive layers onto flat surfaces, without compromising the photoactivity of immobilized photocatalysts. Such paintable photoreactors are envisaged particularly as low-cost devices for detoxification of water from highly toxic persistent organic pollutants which represent a serious health issue in many remote rural areas of Vietnam and other countries. The 4G-PHOTOCAT project will provide novel scientific insights into the correlation between compositional/structural properties and photocatalytic reaction rates under sunlight irradiation, as well as improved fabrication methods and enhanced product portfolio for the industrial partners. Finally, 4G-PHOTOCAT will lead to intensified collaboration between scientists working at the cutting edge of synthetic chemistry, materials science, heterogeneous photocatalysis, theoretical modelling, and environmental analytics, as well as to unique reinforcement of cooperation between scientists and industry partners from EU and ASEAN countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-NIGHT | Award Amount: 193.08K | Year: 2012

The impossible becomes possible on one particular night of the year! On 28 September 2012, all persons participating in Malopolska Researchers Night 2012 will be able to pass through the door of the future to discover the incredible present and go on a breath-taking scientific trip through time and space. Malopolska Researchers Night 2012 will be held in four of the Regions cities/towns: Krakow, Tarnow, Nowy Sacz and Niepolomice. With their huge scientific potential, these centres put Malopolska at the forefront of regional innovation in Poland. Malopolska Researchers Night 2012 is targeted mainly at children and teenagers. We want to show them how fascinating the research work can be. In a fun atmosphere, we will attempt to overcome the traditional stereotype of the researcher as a person whose head is in the clouds and who has little touch with reality. During the Night everybody will have the chance to meet face to face with researchers and see for themselves what fascinating individuals they are: full of passion, having a variety of interests yet dedicated to their work and investing immense efforts in the advancement of science. In 2012, Malopolska Researchers Night will be organised on an unprecedented scale thanks to the involvement of 15 Partners and 24 supporting institutions. 41 locations in Malopolska will be available to the public. Around 80 workshops, 108 shows and demonstrations and over 50 lectures will be hosted by 36 faculties/departments. Researchers will provide tours of as many as 50 laboratories and 19 exhibitions. Nearly 30 competitions and games will await the youngest participants. There will also be a wide choice of accompanying events: 8 theatre and cabaret performances by researchers, a music concert and multimedia shows. Nearly 700 researchers, over 300 students and 50 students associations will take the public on this incredible scientific journey.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-NIGHT | Award Amount: 178.16K | Year: 2011

Malopolska Researchers Night 2011, an event hosted by the regions four cities and towns: Krakow, Tarnow, Nowy Sacz and Niepolomice. On this special Night you will be able to feel like Harry Potter on a journey to meet incredible researchers. On 23 September 2011 Malopolska will go science mad for the fifth year running! The fifth anniversary of Malopolska Researchers Night will not be the only reason to celebrate. The year 2011 will also mark the 500th anniversary of the arrival of the first guinea pig in Europe and the 100th anniversary of Marie Curies Nobel Prize in chemistry. This will be the only night of the year when researchers will turn into excellent actors, directors, musicians, guides to the nooks and crannies of research laboratories, contestants and, above all, incredibly fascinating individuals. Attractions will range from experiments with public participation through innovative demonstrations, experiments, do-it yourself workshops to fascinating discussions, shows, concerts and games. Everybody will find something interesting for themselves. The project attracts huge public interest in the region and beyond (ca. 3,500 participants in 2007, ca.15,000 in 2008, ca. 20,000 in 2009 and ca. 27,000 in 2010). Factors such as the experience of previous years of the project and effective and well-established partnerships within the region are helpful in preparing the event and making it get better and better, year by year. A total of 13 Partners and 22 other organisations will participate in the project As many as approx. 520 researchers will be running activities on the Night with the help of over 240 students. The event will take place in 33 locations throughout Malopolska. The programme of attractions will include 71 workshops, over 150 shows and demonstrations, nearly 30 competitions and games, nearly 50 lectures, 60 guided tours of laboratories, a theatre performance, 4 concerts, 2 cabaret performances and a chemistry musical.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-NIGHT | Award Amount: 178.52K | Year: 2013

In 2013, Malopolska Researchers Night will be organised for the seventh time. Malopolska Researchers Night 2013 will be organised on an unprecedented scale thanks to the involvement of 24 Partners (both consortium and non-consortium members) and 24 collaborating institutions. On 27 September 2013, all present and future lovers of science are invited to join researchers in the four regional towns and cities participating in the project, i.e. Krakow, Tarnow, Nowy Sacz and Niepolomice, and explore the secrets of the research profession or just have fun playing with science. A record number of ca. 700 researchers and ca. 500 students (a total of 1,300!) as well as over 60 students associations have offered to assist with the project. Apart from the Partners participating in previous years of the project, new institutions, faculties and departments have joined this years project. Attractions such as ca. 150 workshops, 180 shows and demonstrations, over 100 lectures and guided tours of nearly 60 laboratories will await those who visit one of the 42 locations participating in Malopolska Researchers Night 2013. Lovers of puzzles will have a choice of ca. 35 competitions and quizzes and children will be invited to ca. 25 games with researchers. Malopolska Researchers Night 2013 will offer an opportunity to demonstrate not only what researchers do at work but also what they do in their free time. There will be exhibitions, theatre plays featuring researchers as actors, meetings and discussions over a cup of coffee and a talk show with researchers. Given the wide and varied programme of attractions, the participation of new institutions and the lessons learned from the six previous years of the project (it attracted 46,000 people last year) it is estimated that over 55,000 people will participate in Malopolska Researchers Night 2013. A professionally prepared and intensive awareness campaign will reach nearly 3 million people with information about the event.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.31M | Year: 2012

The most prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases of humans are complex disorders of multifactorial aetiology influenced by genes, the environment and their interactions. Periodontitis (PD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two such chronic inflammatory diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and have recently shown to have a bi-directional association. Moreover, the prevalence of both increases substantially with age, and given both the Europe-wide ageing population and the impact of both diseases upon the economy, health and quality of life, it is clear that novel and more cost effective approaches to management are urgently required. A key research goal of this project is to improve understanding of the pathogenesis of RA and PD and their inter-relationships, through the study of common risk factors linked to the activation of host and bacterial derived protein citrullination, which subsequently generates pro-inflammatory auto-antigens in the joints and periodontal tissues. Our vision is that enhanced biological understanding in this area will inform the future development of new approaches to disease prevention, early diagnosis and novel therapies. RAPID aims to provide a significant contribution to this by establishing a first class, dynamic training network of 12 partners and 5 associated partners for early career researchers who will be able to advance chronic inflammatory disease research by working across sectors and disciplines. The network is an interdisciplinary cooperative of medical and dental clinicians, epidemiologists, bio-scientists, industrial scientists, media and commercialization specialists. The aim of the Training Programme is to increase the knowledge base and experience of trainees in the different research areas and to develop their transferable skills for future careers in industry or academia, whilst advancing the field through new discovery.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-NIGHT | Award Amount: 149.08K | Year: 2010

If you wish to accompany researchers on an exploration of the mysteries of the world, come to Malopolska on 24 September 2010! On this unique night Malopolska will once again go science mad. Adventures with researchers will take place in three cities of the region: Krakow, Tarnow and Nowy Sacz. Researchers Night will provide a chance to meet and interact with researchers not only in their natural habitat but also in unexpected situations and venues. On this once-in-a-year occasion researchers will take on different personas: those of excellent actors, brilliant directors, guides through the mysterious nooks and crannies of scientific laboratories, sports competitors and geniuses who know the answers to almost any question. The event will provide an excellent opportunity to challenge the stereotypes and promote the image of researchers as a colourful, attractive and creative community. By gaining an insight into the work of researchers, young people will be encouraged to consider a career in research as an alternative to the much-advertised professions in business, entertainment, politics or the media.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-NIGHT | Award Amount: 114.81K | Year: 2009

Southern Poland will go science mad on 25 September 2009, the third such event in as many years. In Krakw, Tarnw and Nowy Scz, cities forming part of the Where the researchers work route, researchers will come out of the confines of their laboratories and lecture halls, in which they spend their days making discoveries and exploring the frontiers of knowledge, to show their other face. Researchers Night will provide a chance to meet and interact with researchers not only in their everyday work environment, but also in unexpected situations and venues. Researchers will, in their turn, have an opportunity to challenge stereotypes by casting themselves in entirely new roles: as theatre actors, film directors and many more. Participants in Researchers Night will become acquainted with the cutting edge of scientific discovery. This will be a unique opportunity to get in touch with true science by exploring places that are otherwise inaccessible to the public: laboratories and other research facilities. Everybody will be able to approach researchers with questions. The project is based on a formula of hands-on demonstrations, dazzling experiments, entertaining discussions, amusing plays and interesting workshops and is designed to ensure that there will be enough variety for everyone to find something interesting to do. Malopolska Researchers Night is becoming a regular fixture on the regions calendar of events. The previous years project attracted as many as 15,000 participants, providing us with experience to build on for future success. Malopolska Researchers Night 2009 will take place in Krakw Polands most beautiful city, a centre of science and the seat of the oldest university in Eastern Europe and in Tarnw and Nowy Scz, new but rapidly growing research centres in Malopolska Voivodeship.


Walczynska A.,Jagiellonian University | Serra M.,University of Valencia
Hydrobiologia | Year: 2014

The strategy of decreasing size with increasing temperature operates at regional and phenotypic scale and presents a puzzle to researchers. In this work, we studied two aspects of the temperature-performance relationship along a temperature gradient, (i) comparing the population growth rates of three cryptic Brachionus species differing in adult size, and (ii) assessing the phenotypic plasticity of adult size, in one clone per species. The working hypotheses were that (i) the bigger the species the lower its optimal temperature for population growth, and (ii) the higher the temperature the smaller the individual within each focal species. The results showed that (i) the optimal temperature for population growth is related to species size in a manner foreseen by Bergmanns' rule for two of the three species (the third, biggest species, performed evenly well at all temperatures examined, what could be explained by its generally eurioic character), and that (ii) the strategy of body size adjustment to environmental temperature differs between species and may depend on the level of temperature specialization. This work demonstrated the usefulness of inter- and intraspecific comparisons for studying the role of growth strategies in adaptation to temperature. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Krasny M.W.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Placzek W.,Jagiellonian University
Acta Physica Polonica B | Year: 2014

We construct a simple model of the Double Drell - Yan Process (DDYP) for proton - proton collisions and investigate its possible contribution to the background for the Higgs-boson searches at the LHC. We demonstrate that under the assumption of the predominance of short range, (0.1) fm, transverse-plane correlations of quark - antiquark pairs within the proton, this contribution becomes important and may even explain the observed excess of the four-lepton events at the LHC - the events interpreted as originating from the Higgs-boson decays: H → ZZ → 4l and H → WW → 2l2ν.


Mrozek M.,Jagiellonian University | Wanner T.,George Mason University
Computers and Mathematics with Applications | Year: 2010

We present an algorithm for computing the homology of inclusion maps which is based on the idea of coreductions and leads to significant speed improvements over current algorithms. It is shown that this algorithm can be extended to compute both persistent homology and an extension of the persistence concept to two-sided filtrations. In addition to describing the theoretical background, we present results of numerical experiments, as well as several applications to concrete problems in materials science. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Rutherford A.W.,Imperial College London | Osyczka A.,Jagiellonian University | Rappaport F.,University Pierre and Marie Curie
FEBS Letters | Year: 2012

The energy-converting redox enzymes perform productive reactions efficiently despite the involvement of high energy intermediates in their catalytic cycles. This is achieved by kinetic control: with forward reactions being faster than competing, energy-wasteful reactions. This requires appropriate cofactor spacing, driving forces and reorganizational energies. These features evolved in ancestral enzymes in a low O 2 environment. When O 2 appeared, energy-converting enzymes had to deal with its troublesome chemistry. Various protective mechanisms duly evolved that are not directly related to the enzymes' principal redox roles. These protective mechanisms involve fine-tuning of reduction potentials, switching of pathways and the use of short circuits, back-reactions and side-paths, all of which compromise efficiency. This energetic loss is worth it since it minimises damage from reactive derivatives of O 2 and thus gives the organism a better chance of survival. We examine photosynthetic reaction centres, bc 1 and b 6f complexes from this view point. In particular, the evolution of the heterodimeric PSI from its homodimeric ancestors is explained as providing a protective back-reaction pathway. This "sacrifice-of- efficiency-for-protection" concept should be generally applicable to bioenergetic enzymes in aerobic environments. © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Boratynski Z.,Jagiellonian University | Boratynski Z.,University of Jyväskylä | Koteja P.,Jagiellonian University
Functional Ecology | Year: 2010

Because energy is a crucial resource, adaptive significance of variation in the rate of energy metabolism, and especially in basal (BMR) and maximum aerobic (VO2max) metabolic rates, is a popular theme in evolutionary and ecological physiology. However, little is known about the association of these traits with fitness components in populations of free-living animals. We studied the association between body size, the metabolic rates, and reproductive success in bank voles (Myodes glareolus) in an isolated, small island population. Correlation analyses were performed for two measures of reproductive performance: mating success (the number of partners with which an individual had any offspring), and overall reproductive success (the number of offspring trapped in the field, calculated for all individuals, including those with no offspring). Direction of the selection on metabolic traits varied between sexes and over time, which could contribute to maintaining a high additive genetic variance of the traits. Mating success and overall reproductive success of males were positively correlated with body size (head width), but not with mass-independent VO2max. The latter result undermines the hypothesis that evolution of high aerobic capacity could be driven by a selection for traits important in male competition. Overall reproductive success was positively correlated with basal metabolic rate. The result corroborates the hypothesis that high BMR and endothermy in mammals could evolve as consequences of intensive parental care evolution. However, the generality of such a correlation remains uncertain and warrants further research. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 British Ecological Society.


Ma S.,University of Melbourne | Blasiak A.,Jagiellonian University | Olucha-Bordonau F.E.,University of Valencia | Verberne A.J.M.,University of Melbourne | Gundlach A.L.,University of Melbourne
Journal of Physiology | Year: 2013

Abstract The nucleus incertus (NI) of the rat hindbrain is a putative node in the ascending control of the septohippocampal system and hippocampal theta rhythm and is stress and arousal responsive. NI contains GABA neurons that express multiple neuropeptides, including relaxin-3 (RLN3) and neuropeptide receptors, including corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 (CRF-R1), but the precise anatomical and physiological characteristics of NI neurons are unclear. Therefore, we examined the firing properties of NI neurons and their responses to CRF, the correlation of these responses with occurrence of relaxin-3, and NI neuron morphology in the rat. Most NI neurons excited by intracerebroventricular CRF infusion were RLN3-positive (9 of 10), whereas all inhibited cells were RLN3-negative (8 of 8). The spontaneous firing of RLN3 (n= 6) but not non-RLN3 neurons (n= 6) was strongly modulated and phase-locked with the initial ascending phase of hippocampal theta oscillations. In brain slices, the majority of recorded NI neurons (15 of 19) displayed excitatory responses to CRF, which uniformly increased action potential frequency and membrane potential depolarization in the presence of tetrodotoxin, indicating a direct, postsynaptic action of CRF on NI neurons. This excitation was associated with reduction in the slow component of afterhyperpolarization and a strong depolarization. Quantitative analysis in naïve rats of validated CRF-R1, RLN3 and neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) immunoreactivity revealed 52% of NI neurons as CRF-R1 positive, of which 53% were RLN3 positive, while 48% of NI neurons lacked CRF-R1 and RLN3. All RLN3 neurons expressed CRF-R1. CRF neurons that projected to the NI were identified in lateral preoptic hypothalamus, but not in paraventricular hypothalamus, bed nucleus of stria terminalis or central amygdala. Our findings suggest NI is an important site for CRF modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm via effects on GABA/RLN3 transmission. © 2013 The Physiological Society.


Rycerz A.,Jagiellonian University | Rycerz A.,University of Regensburg
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2010

Electron transport through the Corbino disk in graphene is studied in the presence of uniform magnetic fields. At the Dirac point, we observe conductance oscillations with the flux piercing the disk area Φd, characterized by the period Φ0 =2 (h/e) ln (Ro/ R i), where Ro(Ri) is the outer (inner) disk radius. The oscillations magnitude increase with the radii ratio and exceed 10% of the average conductance for Ro/ Ri ≳5 in the case of the normal Corbino setup or for Ro / Ri ≳ 2.2 in the case of the Andreev-Corbino setup. At a finite but weak doping, the oscillations still appear in a limited range of | Φd | ≤ Φd max, away from which the conductance is strongly suppressed. At large dopings and weak fields we identify the crossover to a normal ballistic transport regime. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.7 | Award Amount: 9.63M | Year: 2011

AtMol will establish comprehensive process flow for fabricating a molecular chip, i.e. a molecular processing unit comprising a single molecule connected to external mesoscopic electrodes with atomic scale precision and preserving the integrity of the gates down to the atomic level after the encapsulation. Logic functions will be incorporated in a single molecule gate, or performed by a single surface atomic scale circuit, via either a quantum Hamiltonian or a semi-classical design approach. AtMol will explore and demonstrate how the combination of classical and quantum information inside the same atomic scale circuit increases the computing power of the final logic circuit. Atomic scale logic gates will be constructed using atom-by-atom manipulation, on-surface chemistry, and unique UHV transfer printing technology. The AtMol research programme necessitates the state-of-the-art UHV atomic scale interconnection machines comprising, within one integrated UHV system, a surface preparation chamber, a UHV transfer printing device, an LT-UHV-STM (or a UHV-NC-AFM) for atomic scale construction, a FIM atomic scale tip apex fabrication device and a multi-probe system with its companion SEM or optical navigation microscope. Only three of these systems exist worldwide and they are each housed within the laboratories members of the AtMol consortium. These systems will be used to interconnect molecular logic gates one-by-one in a planar atomic scale multi-pad approach on the top, atomically reconstructed, surface of the wafer. For this molecular chip, the back face of the wafer will incorporate nano-to-micro-scale interconnections using nanofabricated vias which pass through the substrate to the top face. The hybrid micro-nano back interconnect approach to be developed in the AtMol project will enable the full packaging of the molecular chip preserving the surface atomic scale precision of the gates.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-3-2014 | Award Amount: 2.77M | Year: 2015

It is now accepted that the conducting or insulating nature of matter is based on various separate ingredients (e.g. disorder, interactions, band filling, dimensionality, topology, etc.). However, their complex interplay is still beyond our understanding because experiments are very difficult and numerical calculations are often inefficient, even for supercomputers. In QUIC we want to achieve a breakthrough in the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing insulators and conductors by using quantum simulators, i.e. quantum computers of special purpose, based on fully controllable ultracold gases. In an experiment-theory enterprise, we will engineer several different kinds of such synthetic quantum matter, where we can isolate and study quantitatively the quantum phenomena and phases. We will not only study the physics of real systems, such as disordered and strongly-correlated superconductors and superfluids, but we will also create systems that do not exist so far in nature, such as topological phases in graphene-like lattices. QUIC combines for the first time advanced manipulation techniques of ultracold atomic gases, innovative theoretical ideas of condensed-matter physics and quantum-information methods. The immediate goals of our project are to understand quantitatively the subtle interplay of quantum phenomena in insulators and conductors, explore new promising directions for the engineering of transport in real materials, and lay the foundations for the design of the quantum materials of tomorrow.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES | Award Amount: 879.70K | Year: 2013

The present proposal aims to revitalize and to reinforce the Europe-Arab World exchange in the field of research and training in Social Sciences, during a peculiar historical moment, characterized by the socio-political changes that have taken place in the last year in the Southern Mediterranean Arabic societies. Paying attention to the new context, the proposal will especially focus research on social and political movements in the frame of change dynamics and applying a comparative approach, taking particularly into account the experience of Eastern European countries. The proposal objectives are to contribute to the enrichment of the analytical interpretation and to the monitoring of the social, political ans cultural processes that have taken and are taking place in the arabic World, through the collection of new empirical materials and the development of innovative analytical tools from different disciplines (political science, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, religious studies, media) in an interdisciplinary and comparative approach. These tools will be developped through the active participation of early researchers in the implementation of the proposal, articulating fields surveys and conceptual appoach: structuring exchanges through interdisciplinary training sessions to be followed by mixed groups of junior researchers from the Arab and European universities; implementing a joint doctoral program; organizing conferences, workshops and managerial meetings in different universities of Europe and Maghreb. Consequently, the outcomes of the proposal will contribute to the ongoing international academic and political debate on social and political change to reach a best governance. It will also contribute to bring fresh knowledge in the study of concepts and theories concerning political mobilisation, social movements, youth movements; democracy, citizenship, identity policy. Finaly the proposal will support critical and autonomous social sciences


Patent
Jagiellonian University, Instytut Farmakologii Polskiej Akademii Nauk, French National Center for Scientific Research and Montpellier University | Date: 2013-07-25

This invention concerns pyrroloquinoline derivatives as antagonists of 5-HT6 receptors, to methods for the preparation of these compounds and to novel intermediates useful for their synthesis. The invention also relates to the uses of such compounds and compositions, particularly their use in administering them to patients to achieve a therapeutic effect in schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, maniac depression, epilepsy, obsessive compulsive disorders, mood disorders, migraine, Alzheimers disease, age related cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment, sleep disorders, eating disorders, anorexia, bulimia, panic attacks, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, attention deficit disorder, Parkinsons disease, Huntingtons disease, withdrawal from abuse of cocaine, ethanol, nicotine or benzodiazepines, pain, obesity and type-2 diabetes, functional bowel disorder, Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The compounds have the general formula (XIV), wherein the symbols have the meanings given in the description.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.aimgroup.com

Naspers created a new cloud-based Business Intelligence (BI) system with analytical tools for a wide range of managers and specialists in the company, using data from all Naspers’ classified sites in Poland. The new system was built in the Microsoft Azure cloud. It accumulates and processes data from stuff site OLX.pl, auto site Otomoto.pl and real estate site Otodom.pl. Additionally, it is fed with data from external systems, including payment and financial feeds. The data aggregates up to several terabytes. According to Adam Kwieciński, chief operations officer at OLX Europe, the company needed a comprehensive BI system to provide analytical tools not only to analysts, but most of all, to managers and specialists at the level of the entire organization. Hence the decision on its implementation, he said in a blog post on Microsoft Poland’s website (here). The project was completed within three months. The work included the technical verification of the project assumptions, embedding the system in the Azure cloud, the construction of dashboards and the introduction of Microsoft Power BI. The system was developed jointly by the IT department of Naspers Poland, and ITMagination, an external partner that supported the project. Andrzej Sowula has been a writer and an analyst for AIM Group since March 2013, focusing on the Polish market. As a journalist, he has worked in Poland for regional newspapers and national Internet-focused magazines for almost a decade. He has also substantial both in-house and in a PR agency experience as a PR specialist. Currently, he owns a small PR consultancy in Poland called PR Solutions. Andrzej has graduated from Journalism, Political Science and Business and Management at Jagiellonian University. He lives and works in Krakow.


Lacki M.,Jagiellonian University | Delande D.,Kastler-Brossel Laboratory | Zakrzewski J.,Jagiellonian University
New Journal of Physics | Year: 2013

The extended effective multiorbital Bose-Hubbard-type Hamiltonian which takes into account higher Bloch bands is discussed for boson systems in optical lattices, with emphasis on dynamical properties, in relation to current experiments. It is shown that the renormalization of Hamiltonian parameters depends on the dimension of the problem studied. Therefore, mean-field phase diagrams do not scale with the coordination number of the lattice. The effect of Hamiltonian parameters renormalization on the dynamics in reduced one-dimensional optical lattice potential is analyzed. We study both the quasi-adiabatic quench through the superfluid-Mott insulator transition and the absorption spectroscopy, that is, the energy absorption rate when the lattice depth is periodically modulated. © IOP Publishing and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.


Abbott M.C.,University of Cape Town | Aniceto I.,Jagiellonian University
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2015

We propose a number of modifications to the classical term in the dressing phase for integrable strings in AdS3×S3×S3×S1, and check these against existing perturbative calculations, crossing symmetry, and the semiclassical limit of the Bethe equations. The principal change is that the phase for different masses should start with a term Q1Q2, like the one-loop AdS3 dressing phase, rather than Q2Q3 as for the original AdS5 AFS phase. © 2015 The Authors.


Autschbach J.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Srebro M.,Jagiellonian University
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2014

ConspectusKohn-Sham theory (KST) is the "workhorse" of numerical quantum chemistry. This is particularly true for first-principles calculations of ground- and excited-state properties for larger systems, including electronic spectra, electronic dynamic and static linear and higher order response properties (including nonlinear optical (NLO) properties), conformational or dynamic averaging of spectra and response properties, or properties that are affected by the coupling of electron and nuclear motion.This Account explores the sometimes dramatic impact of the delocalization error (DE) and possible benefits from the use of long-range corrections (LC) and "tuning" of functionals in KST calculations of molecular ground-state and response properties. Tuning refers to a nonempirical molecule-specific determination of adjustable parameters in functionals to satisfy known exact conditions, for instance, that the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) should be equal to the negative vertical ionization potential (IP) or that the energy as a function of fractional electron numbers should afford straight-line segments. The presentation is given from the viewpoint of a chemist interested in computations of a variety of molecular optical and spectroscopic properties and of a theoretician developing methods for computing such properties with KST. In recent years, the use of LC functionals, functional tuning, and quantifying the DE explicitly have provided valuable insight regarding the performance of KST for molecular properties.We discuss a number of different molecular properties, with examples from recent studies from our laboratory and related literature. The selected properties probe different aspects of molecular electronic structure. Electric field gradients and hyperfine coupling constants can be exquisitely sensitive to the DE because it affects the ground-state electron density and spin density distributions. For π-conjugated molecules, it is shown how the DE manifests itself either in too strong or too weak delocalization of localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). Optical rotation is an electric-magnetic linear response property that is calculated in a similar fashion as the electric polarizability, but it is more sensitive to approximations and can benefit greatly from tuning and small DE. Hyperpolarizabilities of π-conjugated "push-pull" systems are examples of NLO properties that can be greatly improved by tuning of range-separated exchange (RSE) functionals, in part due to improved charge-transfer excitation energies. On-going work on band gap predictions is also mentioned. The findings may provide clues for future improvements of KST because different molecular properties exhibit varying sensitivity to approximations in the electronic structure model. The utility of analyzing molecular properties and the impact of the DE in terms of LMOs, representing "chemists orbitals" such as individual lone pairs and bonds, is highlighted. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Sacha K.,Jagiellonian University | Delande D.,Kastler-Brossel Laboratory
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2014

It is common knowledge that a dark soliton can be excited in an ultracold atomic gas by means of the phase imprinting method. We show that, for a superfluid fermionic mixture, the standard phase imprinting procedure applied to both components fails to create a state with symmetry properties identical to those of the dark soliton solution of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. To produce a dark soliton in the BCS regime, a single component of the Fermi mixture should be phase imprinted only. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Delande D.,Kastler-Brossel Laboratory | Sacha K.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2014

The Gross-Pitaevskii equation - which describes interacting bosons in the mean-field approximation - possesses solitonic solutions in dimension one. For repulsively interacting particles, the stationary soliton is dark, i.e., is represented by a local density minimum. Many-body effects may lead to filling of the dark soliton. Using quasiexact many-body simulations, we show that, in single realizations, the soliton appears totally dark although the single particle density tends to be uniform. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Srebro M.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Srebro M.,Jagiellonian University | Autschbach J.,State University of New York at Buffalo
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters | Year: 2012

In the framework of determining system-specific long-range corrected density functionals, the question is addressed whether such functionals, tuned to satisfy the condition -ε HOMO = IP or other energetic criteria, provide accurate electron densities. A nonempirical physically motivated two-dimensional tuning of range-separated hybrid functionals is proposed and applied to the particularly challenging case of a molecular property that depends directly on the ground-state density: the copper electric field gradient (EFG) in CuCl. From a continuous range of functional parametrizations that closely satisfy -ε HOMO = IP and the correct asymptotic behavior of the potential, the one that best fulfills the straight-line behavior of E(N), the energy as a function of a fractional electron number N, was found to provide the most accurate electron density as evidenced by calculated EFGs. The functional also performs well for related Cu systems. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Avigad D.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Gerdes A.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Morag N.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Bechstadt T.,Jagiellonian University
Gondwana Research | Year: 2012

U-Pb-Hf of detrital zircons from diverse Cambrian units in Morocco and Sardinia were investigated in order to clarify the sandstone provenance and how it evolved with time, to assess whether the detrital spectra mirror basement crustal composition and whether they are a reliable pointer on the ancestry of peri-Gondwanan terranes. Coupled with Hf isotopes, the detrital age spectra allow a unique perspective on crustal growth and recycling in North Africa, much of which is concealed below Phanerozoic sediments.In Morocco, the detrital signal of Lower Cambrian arkose records local crustal evolution dominated by Ediacaran (0.54-0.63Ga) and Late-Paleoproterozoic (1.9-2.2Ga; Eburnian) igneous activity. A preponderance of the Neoproterozoic detrital zircons possess positive ε Hf(t) values and their respective Hf model ages (T DM) concentrate at 1.15Ga. In contrast, rather than by Ediacaran, the Neoproterozoic detrital signal from the Moroccan Middle Cambrian quartz-rich sandstone is dominated by Cryogenian-aged detrital zircons peaking at 0.65Ga alongside a noteworthy early Tonian (0.95Ga) peak; a few Stenian-age (1.0-1.1Ga) detrital zircons are also distinguished. The majority of the Neoproterozoic zircons displays negative ε Hf(t), indicating the provenance migrated onto distal Pan-African terranes dominated by crustal reworking. Terranes such as the Tuareg Shield were a likely provenance. The detrital signal of quartz-arenites from the Lower and Middle Cambrian of SW Sardinia resembles the Moroccan Middle Cambrian, but 1.0-1.1Ga as well as ~2.5Ga detrital zircons are more common. Therefore, Cambrian Sardinia may have been fed from different sources possibly located farther to the east along the north Gondwana margin. 1.0-1.1Ga detrital zircons abundant in Sardinia generally display negative ε Hf(t) values while 0.99-0.95Ga detrital zircons (abundant in Morocco) possess positive ε Hf(t), attesting for two petrologically-different Grenvillian sources. A paucity of detrital zircons younger than 0.6Ga is a remarkable feature of the detrital spectra of the Moroccan and Sardinian quartz-rich sandstones. It indicates that late Cadomian orogens fringing the northern margin of North Africa were low-lying by the time the Cambrian platform was deposited. About a quarter of the Neoproterozoic-aged detrital zircons in the quartz-rich sandstones of Morocco (and a double proportion in Sardinia) display positive ε Hf(t) values indicating considerable juvenile crust addition in North Africa, likely via island arc magmatism. A substantial fraction of the remaining Neoproterozoic zircons which possess negative ε Hf(t) values bears evidence for mixing of old crust with juvenile magmas, implying crustal growth in an Andean-type setting was also significant in this region. © 2011 International Association for Gondwana Research.


Alba A.C.,University of Toronto | Agoritsas T.,McMaster University | Jankowski M.,Jagiellonian University | Courvoisier D.,University of Rhode Island | And 3 more authors.
Circulation: Heart Failure | Year: 2013

Background-Optimal management of heart failure requires accurate assessment of prognosis. Many prognostic models are available. Our objective was to identify studies that evaluate the use of risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure and describe their performance and clinical applicability. Methods and Results-We searched for studies in Medline, Embase, and CINAHL in May 2012. Two reviewers selected citations including patients with heart failure and reporting on model performance in derivation or validation cohorts. We abstracted data related to population, outcomes, study quality, model discrimination, and calibration. Of the 9952 studies reviewed, we included 34 studies testing 20 models. Only 5 models were validated in independent cohorts: the Heart Failure Survival Score, the Seattle Heart Failure Model, the PACE (incorporating peripheral vascular disease, age, creatinine, and ejection fraction) risk score, a model by Frankenstein et al, and the SHOCKED predictors. The Heart Failure Survival Score was validated in 8 cohorts (2240 patients), showing poor-to-modest discrimination (c-statistic, 0.56-0.79), being lower in more recent cohorts. The Seattle Heart Failure Model was validated in 14 cohorts (16 057 patients), describing poor-to-acceptable discrimination (0.63-0.81), remaining relatively stable over time. Both models reported adequate calibration, although overestimating survival in specific populations. The other 3 models were validated in a cohort each, reporting poor-to-modest discrimination (0.66-0.74). Among the remaining 15 models, 6 were validated by bootstrapping (c-statistic, 0.74-0.85); the rest were not validated. Conclusions-Externally validated heart failure models showed inconsistent performance. The Heart Failure Survival Score and Seattle Heart Failure Model demonstrated modest discrimination and questionable calibration. A new model derived from contemporary patient cohorts may be required for improved prognostic performance. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.


Moore B.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Srebro M.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Srebro M.,Jagiellonian University | Autschbach J.,State University of New York at Buffalo
Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation | Year: 2012

Norbornenone, which has both a C=O and a C=C chromophore in a rigid bicyclic hydrocarbon framework, exhibits optical rotation (OR) an order of magnitude larger than that of similar molecules with only one of these chromophores (e.g., α-pinene). Its OR is also very sensitive to approximations in electronic structure calculations. The present study demonstrates a novel approach to interpret optical rotation using familiar concepts of chemical bonding, aided by first-principles calculations. A theoretical procedure is developed for analyzing the OR tensor components of a molecule in terms of individual bonds and lone pairs. The link between the chemists bond and quantum mechanics is provided by localized molecular orbitals obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Delocalization of π orbitals is shown to play a crucial role in the large OR of norbornenone, as hinted by the DFT delocalization error inherent in many standard functionals and confirmed by detailed analysis. The OR contributions generated by the double bond in α-pinene are even stronger than that of norbornenone. The isotropic average, observed in solution or in gas phase, is small as a result of cancellation of tensor components with opposite signs. The electronic coupling and delocalization of the C=C π bond and the C=O oxygen π lone pair in norbornenone selectively enhance one of the OR tensor components, resulting in the exceptionally large negative isotropic OR. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Srebro M.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Srebro M.,Jagiellonian University | Autschbach J.,State University of New York at Buffalo
Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation | Year: 2012

For range-separated hybrid density functionals, the consequences of using system-specific range-separation parameters (γ) in calculations of optical rotations (ORs) are investigated. Computed ORs at three wavelengths are reported for methyloxirane, norbornenone, β-pinene, [6]helicene, [7]helicene, and two derivatives of [6]helicene. The γ parameters are adjusted such that Kohn-Sham density functional calculations satisfy the condition -ε HOMO(N) = IP. For β-pinene, the behavior of the energy as a function of fractional total charge is also tested. For the test set of molecules, comparisons of ORs with available coupled-cluster and experimental data indicate that the γ "tuning" leads to improved results for β-pinene and the helicenes and does not do too much harm in other cases. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Janik R.A.,Jagiellonian University | Janik R.A.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Laskos-Grabowski P.,Jagiellonian University | Laskos-Grabowski P.,Wrocław University
Nuclear Physics B | Year: 2012

The algebraic curve (finite-gap) classification of rotating string solutions was very important in the development of integrability through comparison with analogous structures at weak coupling. The classification was based on the analysis of monodromy around the closed string cylinder. In this paper we show that certain classical Wilson loop minimal surfaces corresponding to the null cusp and qq potential with trivial monodromy can, nevertheless, be described by appropriate algebraic curves. We also show how a correlation function of a circular Wilson loop with a local operator fits into this framework. The latter solution has identical monodromy to the pointlike BMN string and yet is significantly different. © 2012.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 535.50K | Year: 2014

The objective of this project is to build upon, solidify, formalise and condense the recently initiated, but as yet informal, relationships between leading research institutions representing different regions and historical traditions in order to conduct joint research and participate in knowledge exchange to identify new paradigms for understanding how national identities are disrupted and formed by the traumas of history. By moving this consortium from an informal, ad hoc set of alliances to a structured programme of exchanges, the SPeCTReSS programme, we will generate new research results and new methodologies across the disciplinary spectrum we represent, a rich transfer of knowledge between institutions, research groups and culturally inscribed traditionas of scholarship, generating the basis for long term, sstainable cooperation between the partners. The basis of the research question we share is as follows: In contemporary scholarship, much discussion of national identity is framed in a context of something specific that has come before: post-colonial, post-war, post-apartheid, post-communism, etc.. More useful, however, than such contested terms as nationalism or patriotism, is that of cultural trauma. culturally defined and interpreted shock to the cultural tissue of a society. SPeCTReSS will pursue this revised notion not just in theoretical and historical terms, but focussing on the cultural production of affected communities.


News Article | September 30, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Man’s best friend can sometimes be wildlife’s worst enemy. Free-roaming dogs, both feral and owned animals that run loose, spread rabies and other diseases, kill wild animals and have caused extinctions. They’re even to blame for thousands of human deaths every year. And yet dogs get little of the hatred aimed at feral cats — and only a fraction of the attention from scientists. Perhaps that needs to change. A new study places the domestic dog among the four invasive mammals that have caused the most extinctions of native species. Cats and rodents are the worst, responsible for 63 and 75 extinctions, respectively — mostly birds. Dogs have caused around 10 extinctions and threaten another 156 species, Tim Doherty of Deakin University in Australia and colleagues report September 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. So while dogs aren’t as bad as cats on the extinction scale, their impact shouldn’t be ignored, especially when you look more closely at the harm they can do. Though that can be a little difficult, Izabela Wierzbowska of Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, and colleagues note in a study published in the September Biological Conservation. There is a “paucity of scientific studies on the ecological impact of domestic dogs,” especially at the national level, they note. The researchers tried to rectify that by tallying up the wildlife killed by free-roaming dogs in Poland (a nation roughly the size of New Mexico). Wierzbowska and her team took advantage of Poland’s strict management of its rural lands, which are divvied up into 49 hunting districts where the mortality of game species must be reported every year. This meant the researchers could count kills by free-roaming dogs, both feral and owned. From 2002 to 2011, the records showed that dogs killed an average of 33,000 wild animals each year, plus 280 or so livestock. That’s probably an underestimate, though, since it is unlikely that hunting district managers recorded every kill made by a stray dog. Unlike cats, which tend to go for small prey, the dogs often took on much larger animals, such as deer and boar. But the dogs also killed plenty of smaller animals, including brown hare (which accounted for half of their kills), badgers and grouse. Dogs also killed animals protected from human hunters, such as the European hamster and the black grouse. The scale of the killing was dwarfed by that done legally by humans, so it’s unlikely the dogs are going to drive Polish deer to extinction anytime soon. But there are plenty of other ways that dogs can harm wildlife, the researchers note. They carry and spread pathogens such as rabies and canine distemper virus (which threatens Siberian tigers, among other animals). Their very presence can change the behavior of wild animals, and not for the better. They compete with native wildlife for prey. And when they kill livestock, local wolves may take the blame, increasing wolf-human conflict. Free-roaming dogs are also a huge threat to people. In India, where millions of dogs roam the streets, more than 20,000 people die each year from rabies. And even in the United States, free-roaming dogs can be a huge problem in cities, and especially in poor areas. I once heard a frightening story: A woman I met in the waiting room of the vet hospital explained that she was there after having to choose whether to save her child or her pet from a free-roaming dog that attacked them. She whisked her kid to safety on top of a car and hoped that the vet could save the pet dog she had to leave to take the brunt of the attack. So before we start exterminating the world’s feral cat population (good luck with that), perhaps we should turn some of that energy on figuring out what to do about the dogs. Or even the rodents — since they’re the biggest problem of them all when it comes to driving other species extinct.


News Article | August 31, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Thirsty zebra finches “drink” their body fat. The songbirds are the first birds shown to get through a day without water by breaking down adipose tissue to stay hydrated, says evolutionary physiologist Ulf Bauchinger. Two earlier tests of deprived birds summoning water from their tissues report that birds rely on protein. But zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) coped with one-day droughts in the lab not by breaking down such tissues as muscle but with the safer choice of metabolizing fat, say Bauchinger, Joanna Rutkowska and their colleagues at Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland. In comfortable temperatures and humidity, the little birds (averaging 13.5 grams in weight) produced about 0.444 grams of water metabolically. That boost would have taken large amounts of fleshy moist protein, equivalent to one-third the mass of their flight muscles or three times the mass of their hearts, the researchers say online August 31 in the Journal of Experimental Biology. “Exciting,” says Alexander Gerson of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, whose own work has shown birds taking the protein route. Gerson’s interest in animals deriving water by metabolizing body parts traces to research on migratory birds surviving several thousand kilometers of flight across the Sahara. His wind-tunnel tests of five-hour flights in dry air suggested that birds were fueling their flight with energy from fat reserves but were supplementing with water produced by breaking down protein. What deprived birds do when they’re not migrating, however, might involve different trade-offs. But Gerson’s work with house sparrows kept from water still showed evidence of metabolizing proteins. Unlike house sparrows, zebra finches have an evolutionary history of life in dry places, such as arid Australia. To see their water-management techniques, the researchers in Poland created total food and/or water shortages for lab birds just doing mundane finch things in cages instead of crossing a desert. All the birds reached the end of their bad day without signs of dehydration, the researchers found. But 12 birds deprived of food and water showed more total fat loss than another 12 birds allowed to drink but not eat. Parched finches had 42 percent less fat than birds that had access to drinking water. Measures of lost lean tissue, including protein-rich muscle, barely differed. Other bird species might respond to water shortages in the same way, Rutkowska speculates. Her test method differs a bit from the sparrow work. Gerson muses that zebra finches, with arid lands in their native range, might have different thresholds for metabolizing fat versus protein than house sparrows do. For humans, Rutkowska says she gets asked about implications for dieting. Her answer: Sorry, no evidence of miracle shortcuts here.


Simon A.,Jagiellonian University | Warczak A.,Jagiellonian University | Elkafrawy T.,Western Michigan University | Tanis J.A.,Western Michigan University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

Multielectron capture processes observed in low energy collisions of bare ions with target atoms open insight into electron correlations in electromagnetic fields. Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) provides the simplest tool for investigation of such processes. Here, the experimental observation of the RDEC process in collisions of O8+ ions with thin carbon films is presented and the RDEC cross section value obtained is compared with recent theoretical calculations. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Witala H.,Jagiellonian University | Glockle W.,Ruhr University Bochum
Physical Review C - Nuclear Physics | Year: 2012

We investigate how strongly a hypothetical 1S 0 bound state of two neutrons would affect observables in neutron-deuteron reactions. To that aim we extend our momentum-space scheme of solving the three-nucleon Faddeev equations and incorporate in addition to the deuteron also a 1S 0 di-neutron bound state. We discuss effects induced by a di-neutron on the angular distributions of the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering and deuteron breakup cross sections. A comparison to the available data for the neutron-deuteron total cross section and elastic scattering angular distributions cannot decisively exclude the possibility that two neutrons can form a 1S 0 bound state. However, strong modifications of the final-state-interaction peaks in the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction seem to disallow the existence of a di-neutron. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Witala H.,Jagiellonian University | Glockle W.,Ruhr University Bochum
Physical Review C - Nuclear Physics | Year: 2011

Large discrepancies between quasifree neutron-neutron (nn) cross section data from neutron-deuteron (nd) breakup and theoretical predictions based on standard nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) forces are pointed out. The nn 1S0 interaction is shown to be dominant in that configuration and has to be increased to bring theory and data into agreement. Using the next-to-leading order 1S0 interaction of chiral perturbation theory, we demonstrate that the nn quasifree scattering cross section depends only slightly on changes of the nn scattering length but is very sensitive to variations of the effective range parameter. In order to account for the reported discrepancies one must decrease the nn effective range parameter by ≈12% from its value implied by charge symmetry and charge independence of nuclear forces. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Frisoli T.M.,Roosevelt University | Schmieder R.E.,University Hospital | Grodzicki T.,Jagiellonian University | Messerli F.H.,Roosevelt University
European Heart Journal | Year: 2011

Lifestyle changes have been shown to effect significant blood pressure (BP) reductions. Although there are several proposed neurohormonal links between weight loss and BP, body mass index itself appears to be the most powerful mediator of the weightBP relationship. There appears to be a mostly linear relationship between weight and BP; as weight is regained, the BP benefit is mostly lost. Physical activity, but more so physical fitness (the physiological benefit obtained from physical activity), has a dose-dependent BP benefit but reaches a plateau at which there is no further benefit. However, even just a modest physical activity can have a meaningful BP effect. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables with low-fat dairy products and low in saturated and total fat (DASH) is independently effective in reducing BP. Of the dietary mineral nutrients, the strongest data exist for increased potassium intake, which reduces BP and stroke risk. Vitamin D is associated with BP benefit, but no causal relationship has been established. Flavonoids such as those found in cocoa and berries may have a modest BP benefit. Neither caffeine nor nicotine has any significant, lasting BP effect. Biofeedback therapies such as those obtained with device-guided breathing have a modest and safe BP benefit; more research is needed before such therapies move beyond those having an adjunctive treatment role. There is a strong, linear relationship between alcohol intake and BP; however, the alcohol effects on BP and coronary heart disease are divergent. The greatest BP benefit seems to be obtained with one drink per day for women and with two per day for men. This benefit is lost or attenuated if the drinking occurs in a binge form or without food. Overall, the greatest and most sustained BP benefit is obtained when multiple lifestyle interventions are incorporated simultaneously. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. © The Author 2011.


Jeevanantham V.,University of Kansas Medical Center | Butler M.,University of Kansas Medical Center | Saad A.,University of Kansas Medical Center | Abdel-Latif A.,University of Kentucky | And 2 more authors.
Circulation | Year: 2012

Background-Despite rapid clinical translation and widespread enthusiasm, the therapeutic benefits of adult bone marrow cell (BMC) transplantation in patients with ischemic heart disease continue to remain controversial. A synthesis of the available data is critical to appreciate and underscore the true impact of this promising approach. Methods and Results-A total of 50 studies (enrolling 2625 patients) identified by database searches through January 2012 were included. Weighted mean differences for changes in left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, infarct size, LV end-systolic volume, and LV end-diastolic volume were estimated with random-effects meta-analysis. Compared with control subjects, BMC-treated patients exhibited greater LV ejection fraction (3.96%; 95% confidence interval, 2.90-5.02; P<0.00001) and smaller infarct size (-4.03%, 95% confidence interval,-5.47 to-2.59; P<0.00001), LV end-systolic volume (-8.91 mL; 95% confidence interval,-11.57 to-6.25; P<0.00001), and LV end-diastolic volume (-5.23 mL; 95% confidence interval,-7.60 to-2.86; P<0.0001). These benefits were noted regardless of the study design (randomized controlled study versus cohort study) and the type of ischemic heart disease (acute myocardial infarction versus chronic ischemic heart disease) and persisted during long-term follow-up. Importantly, all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, and the incidence of recurrent myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis were significantly lower in BMC-treated patients compared with control subjects. Conclusions-Transplantation of adult BMCs improves LV function, infarct size, and remodeling in patients with ischemic heart disease compared with standard therapy, and these benefits persist during long-term follow-up. BMC transplantation also reduces the incidence of death, recurrent myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis in patients with ischemic heart disease. © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.


Bas B.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Bas S.,Jagiellonian University
Electrochemistry Communications | Year: 2010

This work describes a novel type of working electrode for use in voltammetry and polarography - the renewable silver liquid amalgam film-modified silver solid amalgam annular band electrode (AgLAF-AgSAE). The electrode is produced by mechanically refreshing the silver liquid amalgam film (AgLAF) before each measurement. The main constituents of the electrode are: a specially constructed silver solid amalgam annular band electrode (AgSAE), two silicon O-rings, silver liquid amalgam and a polypropylene electrode body. Contaminants from the analyzed solution are removed and the AgSAE surface is covered with a thick layer of fresh amalgam while pulling the AgSAE into the sensor body. During movement in the reverse direction AgLAF is formed and homogenized. The time needed to refresh the film is less than 1 s. The electrode is characterized by excellent surface repeatability (∼ 1%) and long-term stability (over ten thousand measurement cycles). © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Bizon P.,Jagiellonian University | Bizon P.,Max Planck Institute for Physics | Jalmuzna J.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2013

We consider three-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) gravity minimally coupled to a massless scalar field and study numerically the evolution of small smooth circularly symmetric perturbations of the AdS3 spacetime. As in higher dimensions, for a large class of perturbations, we observe a turbulent cascade of energy to high frequencies which entails instability of AdS 3. However, in contrast to higher dimensions, the cascade cannot be terminated by black hole formation because small perturbations have energy below the black hole threshold. This situation appears to be challenging for the cosmic censor. Analyzing the energy spectrum of the cascade we determine the width ρ(t) of the analyticity strip of solutions in the complex spatial plane and argue by extrapolation that ρ(t) does not vanish in finite time. This provides evidence that the turbulence is too weak to produce a naked singularity and the solutions remain globally regular in time, in accordance with the cosmic censorship hypothesis. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Kotko I.,Jagiellonian University | Lasota J.-P.,Jagiellonian University | Lasota J.-P.,CNRS Paris Institute of Astrophysics
Astronomy and Astrophysics | Year: 2012

Context. The physical mechanisms driving angular momentum transport in accretion discs are still unknown. Although it is generally accepted that, in hot discs, the turbulence triggered by the magneto-rotational instability is at the origin of the accretion process in Keplerian discs, it has been found that the values of the stress-to-pressure ratio (the α "viscosity" parameter) deduced from observations of outbursting discs are an order of magnitude higher than those obtained in numerical simulations. Aims. We test the conclusion about the observation-deduced value of α using a new set of data and comparing the results with model outbursts. Methods. We analyse a set of observations of dwarf-nova and AM CVn star outbursts and from the measured decay times determine the hot-disc viscosity parameter α h. We determine if and how this method is model dependent. From the dwarf-nova disc instability model we determine an amplitude vs. recurrence-time relation and compare it to the empirical Kukarkin-Parenago relation between the same, but observed, quantities. Results. We found that all methods we tried, including the one based on the amplitude vs. recurrence-time relation, imply α h ~ 0.1-0.2 and exclude values an order of magnitude lower. Conclusions. The serious discrepancy between the observed and the MRI-calculated values of the accretion disc viscosity parameter α is therefore real since there can be no doubt about the validity of the values deduced from observations of disc outbursts. © 2012 ESO.


Wysokinski M.M.,Jagiellonian University | Spalek J.,Jagiellonian University | Spalek J.,AGH University of Science and Technology
Journal of Physics Condensed Matter | Year: 2014

We discuss the Hubbard model in an applied magnetic field and analyze the properties of neutral spin1/2 fermions within the socalled statistically consistent Gutzwiller approximation. The magnetization curve reproduces in a semiquantitative manner the experimental data for liquid3 He in the regime of moderate correlations and in the presence of a small number of vacant cells, modeled by a nonhalffilled band situation, when a small number of vacancies (∼5%) is introduced in the virtual fcc lattice. We also present the results for the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat, in which a metamagneticlike behavior is also singled out in a nonhalffilled band case. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK.


Roth W.J.,Jagiellonian University | Gil B.,Jagiellonian University | Makowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Marszalek B.,Jagiellonian University | Eliasova P.,J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2016

Many chemical compositions produce layered solids consisting of extended sheets with thickness not greater than a few nanometers. The layers are weakly bonded together in a crystal and can be modified into various nanoarchitectures including porous hierarchical structures. Several classes of 2-dimensional (2D) materials have been extensively studied and developed because of their potential usefulness as catalysts and sorbents. They are discussed in this review with focus on clays, layered transition metal oxides, silicates, layered double hydroxides, metal(iv) phosphates and phosphonates, especially zirconium, and zeolites. Pillaring and delamination are the primary methods for structural modification and pore tailoring. The reported approaches are described and compared for the different classes of materials. The methods of characterization include identification by X-ray diffraction and microscopy, pore size analysis and activity assessment by IR spectroscopy and catalytic testing. The discovery of layered zeolites was a fundamental breakthrough that created unprecedented opportunities because of (i) inherent strong acid sites that make them very active catalytically, (ii) porosity through the layers and (iii) bridging of 2D and 3D structures. Approximately 16 different types of layered zeolite structures and modifications have been identified as distinct forms. It is also expected that many among the over 200 recognized zeolite frameworks can produce layered precursors. Additional advances enabled by 2D zeolites include synthesis of layered materials by design, hierarchical structures obtained by direct synthesis and top-down preparation of layered materials from 3D frameworks. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Jesionowski T.,Poznan University of Technology | Zdarta J.,Poznan University of Technology | Krajewska B.,Jagiellonian University
Adsorption | Year: 2014

Endowed with unparalleled high catalytic activity and selectivity, enzymes offer enormous potential as catalysts in practical applications. These applications, however, are seriously hampered by enzymes' low thermal and chemical stabilities. One way to improve these stabilities is the enzyme immobilization. Among various tested methods of this process that make use of different enzyme-carrier interactions, immobilization by adsorption on solid carriers has appeared most common. According to these findings, in this review we present a comparative analysis of the literature reports on the recent trends in the immobilization of the enzymes by adsorption. This thorough study was prepared in order to provide a deeper understanding of the process. Both carriers, carrier modifiers and procedures developed for effective adsorption of the enzymes are discussed. The review may thus be helpful in choosing the right adsorption scheme for a given enzyme to achieve the improvement of its stability and activity for a specific application. © 2014 The Author(s).


Salat R.,Warsaw University of Life Sciences | Salat K.,Jagiellonian University
Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine | Year: 2013

Drug interactions are an important issue of efficacious and safe pharmacotherapy. Although the use of drug combinations carries the potential risk of enhanced toxicity, when carefully introduced it enables to optimize the therapy and achieve pharmacological effects at doses lower than those of single agents. In view of the development of novel analgesic compounds for the neuropathic pain treatment little is known about their influence on the efficacy of currently used analgesic drugs.Below we describe the preliminary evaluation of support vector machine in the regression mode (SVR) application for the prediction of maximal antiallodynic effect of a new derivative of dihydrofuran-2-one (LPP1) used in combination with pregabalin (PGB) in the streptozocin-induced neuropathic pain model in mice. Based on SVR the most effective doses of co-administered LPP1 (4. mg/kg) and PGB (1. mg/kg) were predicted to cause the paw withdrawal threshold at 6.7. g in the von Frey test. In vivo for the same combination of doses the paw withdrawal was observed at 6.5. g, which confirms good predictive properties of SVR. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Kaczmarczyk J.,Jagiellonian University | Spalek J.,AGH University of Science and Technology
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2011

The coexistence of antiferromagnetism with superconductivity is studied theoretically within the t-J model with the Zeeman term included. The strong electron correlations are accounted for by means of the extended Gutzwiller projection method within a statistically consistent approach proposed recently. The phase diagram on the band filling-magnetic field plane is shown, and subsequently the system properties are analyzed for the fixed band filling n=0.97. In this regime, the results reflect principal qualitative features observed recently in selected heavy-fermion systems, namely, (i) with the increasing magnetic field the system evolves from coexisting antiferromagnetic-superconducting phase through antiferromagnetic phase toward polarized paramagnetic state and (ii) the onset of superconducting order suppresses partly the staggered moment. The superconducting gap has both the spin-singlet and the staggered-triplet components, a direct consequence of a coexistence of the superconducting state with antiferromagnetism. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Kwolek P.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Oszajca M.,Jagiellonian University | Szacilowski K.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Szacilowski K.,Jagiellonian University
Coordination Chemistry Reviews | Year: 2012

Transition metal oxides at their highest oxidation states usually show semiconducting properties. The most notable example is titanium dioxide, whereas other oxides and oxide binary phases are also wide band gap semiconductors. These materials are usually studied from the point of view of the solid state chemistry or catalysis, but their semiconducting properties upon interaction with photosensitizers are not well recognized with the notable exception of titanium dioxide. Application of these semiconductors as materials for switching devices is also not well recognized. This review paper describes the electronic structure and reactivity of several transition metal oxides towards 2,3-dihydroxyacenes. Furthermore, a simple quantum-mechanical model for the description of such systems is provided. It is demonstrated that not only titanium dioxide, but also other d 0 transition metal oxides can be photosensitized with catechol-derived ligands and that the properties of such systems are strongly affected by the nature of the ligand. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Bizon P.,Jagiellonian University | Bizon P.,Max Planck Institute for Physics | Friedrich H.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Classical and Quantum Gravity | Year: 2013

We consider a massless scalar field propagating on the exterior of the extreme Reissner-Nordström black hole. Using a discrete conformal symmetry of this spacetime, we draw a one-to-one relationship between the behavior of the field near the future horizon and near future null infinity. In particular, we show that the polynomial growth of the second and higher transversal derivatives along the horizon, recently found by Aretakis, reflects well-known facts about the retarded time asymptotics at null infinity. We also observe that the analogous relationship holds true for an axially symmetric massless scalar field propagating on the extreme Kerr-Newman background. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Sulka G.D.,Jagiellonian University | Hnida K.,Jagiellonian University | Agnieszka Brzozka A.,AGH University of Science and Technology
Electrochimica Acta | Year: 2013

The hydroquinone monosulfonate-doped polypyrrole (PPy-HQS) nanowires were successfully fabricated by potentiostatic electropolymerization of pyrrole (Py) inside the pores of home-made through-hole anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The AAO templates with a nominal pore diameter of 80 nm were prepared by a two-step anodization process. The potentiostatic electropolymerization of HQSdoped polymer nanowires was carried out in 0.1 M NaClO4, or 0.1 M LiClO4 or 0.1 M citric acid containing 0.05 M pyrrole and 0.05 M potassium hydroquinone monosulfonate. The synthesized PPy-HQS nanowire arrays were tested as potential potentiometric pH sensors. It was found that pH sensors based on PPy- HQS nanowires exhibited better electrochemical performance toward pH sensing than those based on PPy-HQS thin films. The best potentiometric response to pH changes and a very good stability in time showed the sensor based on the PPy-HQS nanowires polymerized in a 0.1 M LiClO4 solution. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Sulka G.D.,Jagiellonian University | Kapusta-Kolodziej J.,Jagiellonian University | Brzozka A.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Jaskula M.,Jagiellonian University
Electrochimica Acta | Year: 2013

Nanoporous anodic titanium oxide (ATO) layers with different cell sizes, pore diameters and the thicknesses are successfully grown by three-step self-organized anodization in ethylene glycol containing 0.38 wt% of NH 4F and 1.79 wt% of H2O at applied potential differences ranging from 30 V to 70 V at various electrolyte temperatures. A relatively high growth speed (about 40 μm h-1) of nanopore arrays is achieved at 30 °C under the potential difference of 70 V. The morphology and the structure of ATO layers are directly affected by anodizing conditions, especially temperature and potential difference. It was found that the oxide thickness and the cell size are linearly dependent on anodizing potential difference. On the other hand, the anodizing temperature in the range of 10-30 °C does not affect the cell size in ATO films. Analyses of the pore diameter, pore circularity and regularity of the pore arrangement suggests that nanoporous anodic titania with the best pore arrangement can be formed in a controlled manner by anodization performed at 50 V and 20 °C. Surprisingly, below and above this critical potential difference and temperature, pore diameters are smaller and obtained ATO structures are less regular. At higher anodizing temperatures, the regularity of pore arrangement observed at the surface and the pore diameter are considerably affected by the precipitated hydrous titanium dioxide. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Bajnok Z.,MTA Lendulet Holographic QFT Group | Janik R.A.,Jagiellonian University | Wereszczynski A.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of High Energy Physics | Year: 2014

We argue that the conventional method to calculate the OPE coefficients in the strong coupling limit for heavy-heavy-light operators in the N = 4 Super-Yang-Mills theory has to be modified by integrating the light vertex operator not only over a single string worldsheet but also over the moduli space of classical solutions corresponding to the heavy states. This reflects the fact that we are primarily interested in energy eigenstates and not coherent states. We tested our prescription for the BMN vacuum correlator, for folded strings on S5 and for two-particle states. Our prescription for two-particle states with the dilaton leads to a volume dependence which matches exactly to the structure of finite volume diagonal formfactors. As the volume depence does not rely on the particular light operator we conjecture that symmetric OPE coefficients can be described for any coupling by finite volume diagonal form factors. © 2014, The Author(s).


Kotulski L.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Strug B.,Jagiellonian University
Advanced Engineering Informatics | Year: 2013

Different types of graphs has been successfully used to represent designs at different stages of the design process. Changes to a model representing a design during the process can be modelled by applying graph transformations. In many real life design tasks the changes/updates can be carried out simultaneously on different parts of the design. Hence a model based on graph transformations is coupled with a multiagent paradigm to enable the parallelisation of these transformations to mimic the real life approach. In this paper a hypergraph representation and transformation model is used as a basis for building a multiagent system supporting distribution and adaptation in computer aided design. This representation can be applicable throughout the lifecycle of the design. It is based on research in formal language theory, like graph grammars, and distributed models including multiagent systems. The motivation for the work presented here is given and possible applications are described. The application of the theoretical results in a graph distribution toolkit proposed as a multiagent framework is also considered. To assure the efficiency of the system it should be implemented as a parallel multiagent system. The hypergraph distribution and partial replication, allowing for its parts to be managed by agents, is also presented. The approach is illustrated by a case study from the domain of building design, where it is used to represent, modify and maintain building information.© 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Zegrodnik M.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Bunemann J.,Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research | Spalek J.,Jagiellonian University
New Journal of Physics | Year: 2014

We demonstrate the stability of the spin-triplet paired s-wave (with an admixture of extended s-wave) state for the limit of purely repulsive interactions in a degenerate two-band Hubbard model of correlated fermions. The repulsive interactions limit represents an essential extension of our previous analysis (2013 New J. Phys. 15 073050), regarded here as I. We also show that near the half-filling the considered type of superconductivity can coexist with antiferromagnetism. The calculations have been carried out with the use of the so-called statistically consistent Gutzwiller approximation (SGA) for the case of a square lattice. We suggest that the electron correlations in conjunction with the Hund's rule exchange play the crucial role in stabilizing the real-space spin-triplet superconducting state. A sizable hybridization of the bands suppresses the homogeneous paired state. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.


Kaczmarczyk J.,Jagiellonian University | Bunemann J.,Leibniz University of Hanover | Spalek J.,Jagiellonian University | Spalek J.,AGH University of Science and Technology
New Journal of Physics | Year: 2014

A systematic diagrammatic expansion for Gutzwiller wavefunctions (DE-GWFs) proposed very recently is used for the description of the superconducting (SC) ground state in the two-dimensional square-lattice t-J model with the hopping electron amplitudes t (and ) between nearest (and next-nearest) neighbors. For the example of the SC state analysis we provide a detailed comparison of the methods results with those of other approaches. Namely, (i) the truncated DE-GWF method reproduces the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) results and (ii) in the lowest (zeroth) order of the expansion the method can reproduce the analytical results of the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), as well as of the recently proposed 'grand-canonical Gutzwiller approximation' (called either GCGA or SGA). We obtain important features of the SC state. First, the SC gap at the Fermi surface resembles a wave only for optimally and overdoped systems, being diminished in the antinodal regions for the underdoped case in a qualitative agreement with experiment. Corrections to the gap structure are shown to arise from the longer range of the real-space pairing. Second, the nodal Fermi velocity is almost constant as a function of doping and agrees semi-quantitatively with experimental results. Third, we compare the doping dependence of the gap magnitude with experimental data. Fourth, we analyze the k-space properties of the model: Fermi surface topology and effective dispersion. The DE-GWF method opens up new perspectives for studying strongly correlated systems, as it (i) works in the thermodynamic limit, (ii) is comparable in accuracy to VMC, and (iii) has numerical complexity comparable to that of the GA (i.e., it provides the results much faster than the VMC approach). © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.


Kotlarczyk J.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Uchman A.,Jagiellonian University
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology | Year: 2012

The anoxic, mostly black or brown fine-grained sediments of the Menilite Formation (Oligocene-Early Miocene) in the Skole and Subsilesian nappes contain thin layers of bioturbated green or grey-green mudstones, some of which contain the trace fossils Halimedides annulata, Multina isp., Palaeophycus ?tubularis, ?Planolites isp., Rhizocorallium isp., Trichichnus isp. and Zoophycos isp. The Trichichnus-Palaeophycus-(Multina, Halimedides). -Rhizocorallium suite indicates an increase in oxygenation of sediments. The contribution of different ecological groups of fishes, including epipelagic, bathypelagic, benthopelagic, neritic and reef, and demersal taxa changes significantly through the Menilite Formation. The absence or reduction of bathypelagic fishes points to anoxia in the water column. The combination of ichnological and ichthyological data and incorporation of data on benthic foraminifers allowed a reconstruction of oxygenation changes in the sediment and water column during deposition of the Menilite Formation. Total anoxia at the sea floor and in the water column, attributed to a combination of thermo-stratification and extremely high organic productivity, occurred only during the period reflected by ichthyofaunal Zone IPM2 (middle part of the NP23 Zone). Anoxia restricted to the basin floor or upper slope, related in part to upwelling, occurred during sedimentation of the upper part of the Menilite Formation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Bizon P.,Jagiellonian University | Bizon P.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
General Relativity and Gravitation | Year: 2014

It has recently been conjectured that the Anti-de Sitter space is unstable under arbitrarily small perturbations. This article (based on my plenary talk of the same title at the conference GR20 in Warsaw) briefly reviews numerical and analytical evidence supporting this conjecture, putting emphasis on weak turbulence as a driving mechanism of instability. © 2014 The Author(s).


Turcza P.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Duplaga M.,Jagiellonian University
IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics | Year: 2013

This paper presents the design of a hardware-efficient, low-power image processing system for next-generation wireless endoscopy. The presented system is composed of a custom CMOS image sensor, a dedicated image compressor, a forward error correction (FEC) encoder protecting radio transmitted data against random and burst errors, a radio data transmitter, and a controller supervising all operations of the system. The most significant part of the system is the image compressor. It is based on an integer version of a discrete cosine transform and a novel, low complexity yet efficient, entropy encoder making use of an adaptive Golomb-Rice algorithm instead of Huffman tables. The novel hardware-efficient architecture designed for the presented system enables on-the-fly compression of the acquired image. Instant compression, together with elimination of the necessity of retransmitting erroneously received data by their prior FEC encoding, significantly reduces the size of the required memory in comparison to previous systems. The presented system was prototyped in a single, low-power, 65-nm field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) chip. Its power consumption is low and comparable to other application-specific-integrated- circuits-based systems, despite FPGA-based implementation. © 2013 IEEE.


Kresge C.T.,Dow Chemical Company | Roth W.J.,Jagiellonian University | Roth W.J.,J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

By the combination of prior knowledge, observation skills, and novel synthetic approaches, we discovered a family of mesoporous molecular sieves including discrete structures-MCM-41 (hexagonal), MCM-48 (cubic), and MCM-50 (lamellar). These materials were formed unlike that of our classical microporous structures involving reagent induced-macromolecular templating mechanism. Based on synthetic data and working with others, we were able to establish a predictive mechanism of formation and identify a broad class of templating reagents. These initial findings generated great interest and effort worldwide. It resulted in tremendous expansion of knowledge and skills with many new additional discoveries that established a new area of ordered mesoporous materials. They are integrated with zeolites (microporous materials) and based on surfactant inorganic chemistry. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.


Bajnok Z.,MTA Lendulet Holographic QFT Group | Janik R.A.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of High Energy Physics | Year: 2012

In the present paper we derive six and seven loop formulas for the anomalous dimension of the Konishi operator in N=4 SYM from string theory using the technique of Lüscher corrections. We derive analytically the integrand using the worldsheet S-matrix and evaluate the resulting integral and infinite sum using a combination of high precision numerical integration and asymptotic expansion. We use this high precision numerical result to fit the integer coefficients of zeta values in the final analytical answer. The presented six and seven loop results can be used as a cross-check with FiNLIE on the string theory side, or with direct gauge theory computations. The seven loop level is the theoretical limit of this Lüscher approach as at eight loops double-wrapping corrections will appear.


Kulak A.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Kulak A.,Jagiellonian University | Mlynarczyk J.,AGH University of Science and Technology
IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation | Year: 2013

In the extremely low frequency (ELF) range, the space between the ground and ionosphere forms a spherical waveguide. When studying the ELF radio-wave propagation on Earth using analytical models, it is commonly assumed that the ground has perfect conductivity. In some planetary applications, the ground conductivity is so low that it has a significant influence on the radio-wave propagation in the ELF range and it has to be included in the model. This issue has not been resolved in a satisfactory way yet. In this paper, we analyze the penetration of the ground by an electromagnetic wave traveling along the surface and we propose a solution that allows including ground parameters in the frequently used 2-D analytical model of the ground-ionosphere waveguide. The presented calculations show that in most cases on Earth, the differences with such a model are small, up to a few percent for phase velocity. © 1963-2012 IEEE.


Bajnok Z.,MTA Lendulet Holographic QFT Group | Janik R.A.,Jagiellonian University
Journal of High Energy Physics | Year: 2015

We propose a framework for computing the (light cone) string field theory vertex in the case when the string worldsheet QFT is a generic integrable theory. The prime example and ultimate goal would be the AdS5 × S5 superstring theory cubic string vertex and the chief application will be to use this framework as a formulation for N=4$$ \mathcal{N}=4 $$ SYM theory OPE coefficients valid at any coupling up to wrapping corrections. In this paper we propose integrability axioms for the vertex, illustrate them on the example of the pp-wave string field theory and also uncover similar structures in weak coupling computations of OPE coefficients. © 2015, The Author(s).


Capinski M.J.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Zgliczynski P.,Jagiellonian University
Nonlinearity | Year: 2011

We consider the elliptic three-body problem as a perturbation of the circular problem. We show that for sufficiently small eccentricities of the elliptic problem, and for energies sufficiently close to the energy of the libration point L2, a Cantor set of Lyapunov orbits survives the perturbation. The orbits are perturbed to quasi-periodic invariant tori. We show that for a certain family of masses of the primaries, for such tori we have transversal intersections of stable and unstable manifolds, which lead to chaotic dynamics involving diffusion over a short range of energy levels. Some parts of our argument are nonrigorous, but are strongly backed by numerical computations. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd & London Mathematical Society.


Roth W.J.,Jagiellonian University | Roth W.J.,J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry | Gil B.,Jagiellonian University | Marszalek B.,Jagiellonian University
Catalysis Today | Year: 2014

Zeolites have been recognized as 3D framework materials but are now known to also exist in various 2D layered forms with sheets of one unit cell or smaller thickness. We propose a classification system and an expanded concept of zeolite structures integrating various 2D and the traditional 3D forms. Zeolite topology is defined as the primary structure. Various kinds of zeolite mono-layer assemblies are secondary structures. Based on the literature 15 distinct layered forms are recognized. A detailed table is generated showing layered forms that have been reported for various topologies. It provides a classification tool for recognition and verification of known materials. It may be used to identify unknown ones of particular interest to pursue. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Zegrodnik M.,AGH University of Science and Technology | Spalek J.,Jagiellonian University
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2012

The Hund's-rule-exchange induced and coexisting spin-triplet paired and magnetic states are considered within the doubly degenerate Hubbard model with interband hybridization. The Hartree-Fock approximation combined with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) approach is analyzed for the case of square lattice. The calculated phase diagram contains regions of stability of the spin-triplet superconducting phase coexisting with either ferromagnetism or antiferromagnetism, as well as a pure superconducting phase. The influence of the intersite hybridization on the stability of the considered phases, as well as the temperature dependence of both the magnetic moment and the superconducting gaps, are also discussed. Our approach supplements the well-known phase diagrams containing only magnetic phases with the paired triplet states treated on the same footing. We also discuss briefly how to include the spin fluctuations within this model with real-space pairing. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Howczak O.,Jagiellonian University | Spalek J.,Jagiellonian University | Spalek J.,AGH University of Science and Technology
Journal of Physics Condensed Matter | Year: 2012

We apply the extended (statistically consistent, SCA) Gutzwiller-type approach to the periodic Anderson model (PAM) in an applied magnetic field and in the strong-correlation limit. The finite-U corrections are included systematically by transforming the PAM into the form with the Kondo-type interaction and the residual hybridization, both appearing at the same time and on equal footing. This effective Hamiltonian represents the essence of our Anderson-Kondo lattice model. We show that in ferromagnetic phases the low-energy single-particle states are strongly affected by the presence of the applied magnetic field. We also find that for large values of hybridization strength the system enters the so-called locked heavy fermion state introduced earlier. In this state the chemical potential lies in the majority-spin hybridization gap and, as a consequence, the system evolution is insensitive to further increase of the applied field. However, for a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the system transforms from the locked state to the fully spin-polarized phase. This is accompanied by a metamagnetic transition, as well as by a drastic reduction of the effective mass of the quasiparticles. In particular, we observe no effective mass enhancement in the fully polarized state. The findings are in overall agreement with experimental results for the Ce compounds in high magnetic fields. The mass enhancement for the spin-minority electrons may also diminish with the increasing field, unlike for the quasiparticle states in a single narrow band in the same limit of strong correlations. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Changes in metal distribution in the brain have been linked to the degree of malignancy of brain cancer. With results published in Spectrochimica Acta Part B, the researchers found that trace metals could be used to correctly identify cancerous tissue in over 99% of cases and effectively classify the cancer stage. The 4,000th paper to be published based on research carried out at Diamond, this work could have major implications for the early identification and treatment of brain tumours. Diamond's CEO, Andrew Harrison, comments: "I'm delighted that Diamond's 4,000th paper so aptly demonstrates the impact that synchrotron research can have on people's lives. This work is still in its early stages but, in time, the discovery of the link between certain trace metals and their role in the growth of cancer cells could help to redefine the way we identify brain tumours, allowing for earlier diagnosis and, ultimately, a better chance for patients." An international group of scientists from Poland, Austria and Diamond (UK) used a technique known as X-ray fluorescence which is commonly used to determine the presence of different elements within substances down to very low concentrations. Professor Marek Lankosz from AGH University of Science and Technology was principal investigator on the research. He explains: "When exposed to X-rays, elements fluoresce in certain ways: this allows us to determine what elements are present and where. The technique is commonly used in many fields, including space science, ecological and conservation work – but we have now shown that it could have hitherto unrecognised uses in the diagnosis of brain cancer and may provide a significant new clinical tool." Using this technique, the group studied the relationship between trace metals in the brain and the development of cancerous tissue. By using metals as a guide, the scientists discovered that they were able to distinguish, in a non-destructive way, between homogeneous cancerous tissue and structures like blood vessels and calcifications. In addition to identifying the location of tumours, the group also found that trace metals could be used to help assess the malignancy of brain cancer cases. They discovered that in tissue with high grades of malignancy certain trace elements such as iron and calcium were less concentrated than in healthy tissue, whilst zinc was moreso. This means that the trace metals could be used as a biomarker to evaluate the intensity of brain tumours in patients. Professor Dariusz Adamek is a clinician and Head of Chair of Pathomorphology at Jagiellonian University. He comments: "These findings seem promising but it requires further investigations to truly understand the way in which these elements are involved in pathogenesis of tumours or hypothetically play a role as risk factors." "The inherent cellular, genetic and metabolic heterogeneity of these tumours means one has to be very cautious to draw any conclusions. There is definitely a long way ahead to true understanding of a role of trace elements in brain tumour biology. But somewhere and at rather the end of this way there lies possibility of practical clinical implementation of our discoveries in either diagnosis or treatment." More information: Aleksandra Wandzilak et al. X-ray fluorescence study of the concentration of selected trace and minor elements in human brain tumours, Spectrochimica Acta Part B: Atomic Spectroscopy (2015). DOI: 10.1016/j.sab.2015.10.002

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