Jacksonville, AL, United States

Jacksonville State University

www.jsu.edu
Jacksonville, AL, United States

Jacksonville State University is a regional public coeducational university located in Jacksonville, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1883, Jacksonville State offers programs of study in five academic units leading to Bachelor's, Master's, Education Specialist, and Doctorate in addition to continuing and distance education programs. In the Fall semester of 2011, JSU began offering the school's first doctoral degree, Doctor of Science in Emergency Management.The university was founded as Jacksonville State Normal School, and in 1930 the name changed to Jacksonville State Teachers College, and again in 1957 to Jacksonville State College. The university began operating as Jacksonville State University in 1967. In 2008, the university celebrated its 125th anniversary.JSU currently has an enrollment of nearly 9,000 students, with nearly 500 faculty members . Jacksonville State's Business School was ranked within the nation's 90th percentile by the Princeton Review. The current University President is Dr. William A. Meehan.Jacksonville State University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools . In addition, 40 academic programs earned specialized programmatic accreditations. These programs include business, education, engineering and technology, nursing, social work, drama, art, music, computer science, family and consumer science, and communication.221 international students representing 73 countries were enrolled in the 2013-2014 academic year. The University has run its International House program, an international exchange program, for over 60 years. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best universities and colleges in Alabama for 2017. Using government-backed data, the site found 27 four-year schools had the caliber to be on the list. Samford University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Spring Hill College, Auburn University and University of Alabama in Huntsville came in as the top five. 26 two-year schools also made the list, with Enterprise State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, Wallace State Community College Hanceville, Southern Union State Community College and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College ranked as the best five. A full list of schools is included below. “Alabama currently has the third-highest unemployment rate in the country, but schools are working to combat that by providing quality higher education opportunities,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “The colleges and universities on our list offer certificates, degrees and employment resources that best set students up for success in the workforce after school.” To be included on the Alabama’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised for additional data that includes employment services, student counseling, annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid offerings. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Alabama” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Birmingham Southern College Faulkner University Huntingdon College Jacksonville State University Judson College Miles College Oakwood University Samford University Spring Hill College Stillman College Talladega College The University of Alabama Troy University Tuskegee University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Mobile University of Montevallo University of North Alabama University of South Alabama University of West Alabama The Best Two-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama Southern Community College Bevill State Community College Bishop State Community College Calhoun State Community College Central Alabama Community College Chattahoochee Valley Community College Enterprise State Community College Faulkner State Community College Gadsden State Community College H Councill Trenholm State Technical College J F Drake State Community and Technical College J F Ingram State Technical College Jefferson Davis Community College Jefferson State Community College Lawson State Community College-Birmingham Campus Lurleen B Wallace Community College Northeast Alabama Community College Northwest-Shoals Community College Reid State Technical College Remington College-Mobile Campus Shelton State Community College Snead State Community College Southern Union State Community College Wallace Community College - Dothan Wallace Community College - Selma Wallace State Community College - Hanceville About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 4, 2016--Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have received seven R&D 100 Awards in recognition of their significant advancements in science and technology. The honorees were recognized on Nov. 3 at the 54th annual R&D 100 Conference, sponsored by R&D Magazine. The awards, known as the "Oscars of Invention," honor innovative breakthroughs in materials science, biomedicine, consumer products and more from academia, industry and government-sponsored research agencies. This year's seven honors bring ORNL's total of R&D 100 awards to 200 since their inception in 1963. Oak Ridge Graph Analytics for Medical Innovation was developed by a team of ORNL researchers led by Sreenivas Sukumar in collaboration with the National Library of Medicine. ORiGAMI is an artificial intelligence system designed to search, collect and connect medical literature resources to improve medical research discovery. The open source algorithm can search and process NLM's entire MEDLINE database about 1,000 times faster than a normal workstation, find unexplored connections in medical texts and reason with the vast amounts of available information added every day. While most search engines look for keywords in titles and abstracts, ORiGAMI learns language patterns from its users and literature and is able to search in-depth for hidden associations that other searches might miss. Already, the engine has helped researchers investigate possible carcinogens, explore drug-disease interactions and find other serendipitous connections between disparate medical sources. The development team was Sreenivas Sukumar, Larry Roberts, Sangkeun Lee, Alexandra Zakrezewksa (Yale University), Katherine Senter (University of Pennsylvania), Seokyong Hong (North Carolina State) and Seung-Hwan Lim. Funding for this project was provided by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. The Roof Savings Calculator Suite was developed by a team of researchers from ORNL, Jacksonville State University and White Box Technologies. The Roof Savings Calculator is a Web-based tool for simulating energy flow and loss in businesses and homes and predicting the cost-effectiveness of cool roofing and attic technologies based on building type and location. The suite integrates the AtticSim engine with the DOE-2.1E whole-building engine to create hour-by-hour annual simulations of building heating and cooling loads and estimate the impact of cool roofing products on energy and cost savings. It is more accurate and customizable than the current DOE and EPA energy calculators and is designed to educate builders and consumers about the money saving potential of roofing upgrades. The development team was Joshua New, William Miller, Aaron Garrett (Jacksonville State University) and Yu Huang (White Box Technologies). This project was funded by the DOE's Building Technologies Office, the California Energy Commission, White Box Technologies, and CentiMark, with support from additional private companies and trade associations. G-Mode: Full Information Acquisition in Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy was developed by a team of ORNL researchers led by Stephen Jesse. Scanning probe microscopy uses a rastering probe to map the shape of surfaces and capture physical and chemical properties of materials on the nanometer and atomic levels. However, this approach is traditionally limited to a minute fraction of available information, making interpretation of observed nanoscale phenomena much more difficult. G-Mode uses a custom controller to rapidly collect and thoroughly process the information flow from a microscope detector in its entirety, yielding all accessible information about minute changes sensed by the probe as it interacts with nanoscopic volumes of a sample. While competing technologies focus on recording a single, high quality component of the probe signal, they can incidentally filter away or ignore information. G-Mode uses a fundamentally different approach by capturing and storing almost 200 million interactions streaming from the detectors per scan. It then processes the data through advanced machine learning algorithms to expose valuable, information-rich correlations and produce large high-resolution images of dynamic material properties 3,500 times faster than conventional state-of-the-art methods. The development team was Stephen Jesse, Liam Collins, Suhas Somnath, Sergei Kalinin and Alex Belianinov. G-Mode was funded by ORNL's Center for Nanophase Materials Science, a DOE Office of Science User Facility. Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications was developed by a consortium of researchers from ORNL, the Electric Power Research Institute, Westinghouse Nuclear and Idaho, Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories. VERA is a physics simulation tool that visualizes the internal processes of commercial nuclear fission power plants and predicts reactor behavior in a number of potential scenarios. The engine allows nuclear technicians to produce 3-D, high-fidelity power distributions to simulate atomic particle behavior and core conditions on a reactor-wide scale. It has demonstrated the power up process of a new plant, modeled accidents and emergency situations and examined the effects of corrosion on fuel rod performance. The development team consisted of 42 members. The ORNL researchers were Jess Gehin, John Turner, Kevin Clarno, Benjamin Collins, Gregory Davidson, Thomas Evans, Andrew Godfrey, Steven Hamilton, Douglas Kothe, Rose Montgomery, Robert Salko, Srdjan Simunovic, Stuart Slattery and Shane Stimpson. VERA was funded by the DOE's Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors. U-Grabber was developed by a team of ORNL researchers led by Sheng Dai in collaboration with the University of Tennessee and 525 Solutions. The U-Grabber is an adsorbent material designed to extract uranium and other metals from water inexpensively and efficiently. The material is made from polyethylene fibers, similar to PVC, woven into braids and grafted with chains of a uranium-attractive chemical called amidoxine. The free-floating uranium in the water binds with the fibers and can be extracted, purified and sold as nuclear fuel. The fibers can be reconstituted and reused, are cheap to produce at scale and can bolster dwindling terrestrial supplies of uranium. They can also be customized to bind with other toxic or valuable aqueous metals, providing an environmentally sound method of cleaning bodies of water such as mines or fly ash ponds. The development team was Sheng Dai, Suree Brown (UT), Robin Rogers (525 Solutions), Christopher Janke, Richard Mayes, Tomonori Saito and Ronnie Hanes (525 Solutions). U-Grabber was funded by the DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy. Open Port Sampling Interfaces for Mass Spectrometry were developed by ORNL's Gary Van Berkel and Vilmos Kertesz. The most difficult usability barrier for mass spectrometry is producing and transferring viable samples into the device. The Open Port Sampling Interfaces remove this impediment and allow easier, universal input of samples via accessible intake ports. The ports, one a shallow swirling vortex, the other a conical solvent dome, use constantly flowing liquid streams to convey the sample into the ionization source of the spectrometer. They accept many types of samples, from organic oils to biological tissue, and produce results almost instantaneously. The interfaces make mass spectrometry easier for novices and experts alike, as samples do not require processing and the ports are self-cleaning, reducing the risk of cross contamination. Mass spectrometers modified with these new sampling interfaces combine speed, ease of use, and high imaging resolution to serve as a valuable tool in materials science, biology, chemistry and more. This technology is licensed to SCIEX. The development team was Gary Van Berkel and Vilmos Kertesz. This project was funded by the DOE's Office of Science. Waste Tire Derived Carbon was developed by a team of ORNL researchers led by Parans Paranthaman and the RJ Lee Group. ORNL material chemists devised a proprietary process for repurposing discarded car tires as a source of carbon powder, a sooty hydrocarbon byproduct that can be modified to incorporate into anodes of lithium-ion batteries. The recycled tires are shredded, cryogenically pulverized to powder and soaked in sulfuric acid, then roasted in a furnace to recover the carbon composite powders with a yield of more than 50 percent of the original mass. The carbon powder is chemically similar to graphite but has a unique microstructure that is superior in rechargeable batteries, with a higher electrochemical performance and longer cycle life than the best graphite anodes. A large-scale tire-to-battery conversion operation could reduce total battery production costs by 11-12 percent while improving electrical storage capacity and performance. This inexpensive, environmentally beneficial and seemingly unlimited resource is an opportunity to repurpose more than 1 billion car tires discarded globally every year while meeting the rising demand for cheap carbon as the battery market continues to grow. The development team was Parans Paranthaman, Richard Lee (RJ Lee Group), Amit Naskar, Yunchao Li (UT), Kokouvi Akato (UT) and Alan Levine (RJ Lee Group). This project was funded by the DOE's Office of Science and ORNL's Technology Innovation Program. ORNL also received a special recognition award from R&D Magazine for the Wireless Power Transfer Based Electric and Plug-In Vehicle Charging System, submitted by Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America and co-developed by a team of ORNL researchers with support from Cisco Systems and the International Transportation Innovation Center. The team developed the world's first 20-kilowatt wireless charging system for passenger cars and achieved 90 percent efficiency at three times the rate of the plug-in systems commonly used for electric vehicles today. Providing the same speed with the convenience of wireless charging could increase consumer acceptance of electric vehicles and is considered a key enabler for hands-free, autonomous vehicles. Higher power levels are also essential for powering larger vehicles such as trucks and buses. The high-power wireless charging system relies on a unique architecture that includes an ORNL-built inverter, isolation transformer, vehicle-side electronics and coupling technologies. The ORNL researchers on the development team were Steven Campbell, Paul Chambon, Madhu Chinthavali, Omer Onar, Burak Ozpineci, Larry Seiber, David Smith, Lixin Tang, Cliff White and Randy Wiles as well as retired staff members Curt Ayers, Chester Coomer and John Miller. Funding for this project was provided by the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office, Office of Vehicle Technologies. UT-Battelle manages ORNL for the DOE's Office of Science. The DOE Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit the Office of Science website. Cutline: A close-up look at the Open Port Sampling Interfaces for Mass Spectrometry, one of ORNL's seven 2016 R&D 100 Award winners. NOTE TO EDITORS: You may read other press releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory or learn more about the lab at http://www. . Additional information about ORNL is available at the sites below:


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BIRMINGHAM, AL, March 02, 2017-- Dr. Wayne Finley has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.A medical educator with more than six decades of experience, Dr. Finley is highly regarded for mentoring, inspiring, and motivating emerging physicians and graduate students so that they are set up for success at the start of their careers. Retired since 1996, he concluded his career with the University of Alabama School of Medicine, where he dedicated more than 36 years in a variety of roles, serving as Professor; Epidemiology and Public Health; and Chairman of Faculty Council. Certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Dr. Finley served on the genetic counseling committee of the Children's Bureau of the U.S. Department HEW and on the National Research Resources Council of the National Institute of Health. He was a senior scientist for the Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Cystic Fibrosis Research Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). In recognition of his professional excellence, Dr. Finley was recognized by the Distinguished Faculty Lecturer Award, endowment of the Sara C. and Wayne H. Finley Chair in Medical Genetics, and renaming the Reynolds-Finley Historical Library and Annual Lecture by the UAB. He received community awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Birmingham Business Journal. Named to the Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame and presented the President's Medal by UAB, Dr. Finley was also honorably selected for inclusion into Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and Who's Who in the South and Southwest.Before establishing his career in medicine, Dr. Finley served his country as a member of the U.S. Army Infantry in Germany in 1946 and later in the Army Chemical Corps and ultimately achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Reserves. After his service, he attended Jacksonville State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in 1948, and the University of Alabama, where he achieved a Master of Arts in 1950, a Master of Science in 1955, a Ph.D. in 1958, and an MD in 1960. A fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Dr. Finley remained at the top of his field through his memberships in American Medical Association, American Association for the Advancement of Science, New York Academy of Sciences, Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, American Institute of Chemists, American Federation for Clinical Research, American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, American Society of Human Genetics, the Southern Medical Association, Medical Association of the State of Alabama, and Jefferson County Medical Society. As he looks to the future, Dr. Finley intends to enjoy his retirement while taking on select consulting projects as they arise.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The best colleges with online programs in the state of Alabama have been ranked by The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information. Among the 19 four-year schools that made the list, Auburn University, University of Alabama, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Samford University and Judson College came in as the top five schools. Nine of the state’s two-year schools also ranked, with Wallace State Community College Hanceville, Gadsden State Community College, Bevill State Community College, Wallace Community College Selma and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College taking the top five spots. “Interest in online schools in Alabama is quickly growing,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The schools on our list offer high-quality online options for students who not only want greater flexibility, but also the reliability of attending an accredited higher education institution.” Schools on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included: each must be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria such as the availability of post-graduation job resources, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid opportunities. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Alabama’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Faulkner University Jacksonville State University Judson College Samford University Spring Hill College The University of Alabama Troy University United States Sports Academy University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of North Alabama University of South Alabama University of West Alabama Alabama’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Bevill State Community College Calhoun State Community College Gadsden State Community College Jefferson State Community College Lurleen B. Wallace Community College Northwest-Shoals Community College Snead State Community College Wallace Community College - Selma Wallace State Community College - Hanceville ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | November 6, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Best Online Colleges in Alabama have been identified for 2016-2017 by leading online higher education information provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org. After cross-analyzing more than a dozen school-specific statistics, more than 25 colleges in the state were recognized for providing affordable, quality online education programs. Alabama’s leaders include Judson College, Troy University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of North Alabama and the University of Alabama among four-year programs, and Gadsden State Community College, Wallace Community College’s Main, Selma Campus and Hanceville Campus and Snead State Community College among two-year programs. "In the fall semester of 2015 more than 8,500 students enrolled in Alabama public colleges and universities were distance learners,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "As a growing number of students seek online education options, we felt it was important to spotlight the schools in the state offering the best combination of value, flexibility and program options for online students.” Schools are required to meet several minimum qualifications in order to be eligible for the Best Online Colleges in Alabama list. All colleges must hold accreditation and be either a two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit institution. Baseline cost criteria was also set to measure affordability: each two-year school must offer annual in-state tuition under $5,000 and each four-year school must offer annual in-state tuition under $25,000 to qualify. Qualifying colleges are scored and ranked based on several statistics, including qualitative and quantitative data on financial aid, institutional graduation rates and more. All schools included on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s 2016-2017 Best Online Colleges in Alabama ranking are listed below. Further information on each school’s score and the methodology used to determine scores can be found at: The 2016-2017 Best Two-Year Online Colleges in Alabama, in alphabetical order: The 2016-2017 Best Four-Year Online Colleges in Alabama, in alphabetical order: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Faulkner University Heritage Christian University Jacksonville State University Judson College The University of Alabama Troy University United States Sports Academy University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of North Alabama University of West Alabama AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


Ku H.-Y.,University of Northern Colorado | Tseng H.W.,Jacksonville State University | Akarasriworn C.,Srinakharinwirot University
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2013

This study examined online courses with collaborative learning components from 197 graduate students across three consecutive academic years. A student attitude survey containing 20 items and a student teamwork satisfaction scale containing 10 items on a 5-point Likert-type scale with three open-ended questions regarding their online collaborating experiences were collected during the final week of each semester. Results revealed that the three extracted online collaboration factors (Team Dynamics, Team Acquaintance, and Instructor Support) from the student attitude survey had moderate to high degrees of correlation with teamwork satisfaction. Results also revealed that the three collaboration factors accounted for 53% of the variance in online teamwork satisfaction. In addition, results from both surveys and open-ended questions revealed students favored working collaboratively in an online environment. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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