Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Iwaki, Japan

Sugawara N.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Kimura Y.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Araki Y.,Maebashi Institute of Technology
Human Cell | Year: 2012

We report a successful second delivery of a healthy infant fathered using refrozen thawed testicular sperm from an infertile male chimera. We also examined sex chromosome distribution of the seminiferous tubule. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was performed using the remaining refrozen testicular sperm, which had been stored during the first treatment. Biopsied testicular cells were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and the peripheral lymphocyte karyotype was tested using a G-band. Following ICSI, a second pregnancy was established, and a healthy girl was successfully delivered at 40 gestational weeks without complications. Although the husband's lymphocyte chromosomal analysis revealed a 46, XX [28]/46, XY [2] karyotype, the seminiferous tubule cells on histological examination by FISH were chimeric sex chromosome type XX [18]/XY [82]. In conclusion, this is a very rare case report of a successful subsequent delivery of a healthy infant (46, XX) from an infertile true hermaphrodite (46, XX/46, XY) using refrozen thawed testicular sperm. The seminiferous tubule cells' karyotype ratio differed from that of the lymphocytes. © 2012 Japan Human Cell Society and Springer Japan. Source


Sugawara N.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Kimura Y.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Araki Y.,Maebashi Institute of Technology
Human Cell | Year: 2013

We describe a successful pregnancy outcome in a patient with non-mosaic Turner syndrome (45, X) via in vitro fertilization. The patient achieved a second pregnancy at 35 years of age. The her blood lymphocyte karyotype was examined by G-band and FISH. Furthermore, cumulus cells and her elbow skin cells were evaluated via FISH. Non-mosaic Turner syndrome was determined by G-banding [100 % (50/50) 45, X]. Lymphocytes were shown as 478/500 (95. 6 %) cells of X sex chromosome signal, 15/500 (3. 0 %) cells of XXX signal, and 7/500 (1. 4 %) cells of XX signal. The cumulus cells were mosaic: 152/260 (58. 5 %) were X; 84/260 (32. 3 %) were XXX, 20/260 (7. 7 %) were XX, and 4/260 (1. 5 %) were XY. Moreover, skin cells included a mosaic karyotype [47, XXX(29)/46, XX(1)]. We conclude that the collection of a large number of blood lymphocytes can reveal different mosaic patterns (X, XX and XXX) by FISH in spite of non-mosaic Turner syndrome. © 2013 Japan Human Cell Society and Springer Japan. Source


Sugawara N.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Maeda M.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Manome T.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Nagai R.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Araki Y.,Maebashi Institute of Technology
Reproductive Medicine and Biology | Year: 2013

Purpose: Pubertal onset and sexual development are usually normal in 47, XXX individuals; however, we report two cases of premature ovarian failure (POF) in infertile women with trisomy X. Methods: Chromosome analysis was conducted with G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization using X- and Y-bearing probe. Hormonal administration was primarily Kaufmann's treatment or long-term estradiol treatment, followed by withdrawal bleeding from estrogen and progesterone. Results: Two patients with trisomy X, aged 31 (patient 1) and 27 years (patient 2), were diagnosed with POF due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Their ovaries were small. Patient 1 had a FSH level of 44.6 mIU/ml and patient 2 had a FSH level of 74.6 mIU/ml. In patient 1, with Kaufmann's treatment, the FSH decreased to 13.5 mIU/ml; however, follicle growth did not occur following HMG stimulation. In patient 2, FSH did not decrease despite Kaufmann's treatment; therefore, she was given a GnRH agonist and her FSH level decreased to 7.1 mIU/ml. However, her ovaries never responded to HMG stimulation. Conclusion: We report on two patients with a 47, XXX karyotype who became infertile due to POF. We recommend that when a patient is diagnosed with trisomy X, the possibility of POF must be strongly considered. © 2013 Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine. Source


Sugawara N.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Fukuchi H.,Fukuchi Ladies Clinic | Maeda M.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Komaba R.,Iwaki Womens Clinic | Araki Y.,Institute for ARMT
Reproductive Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

We report two extremely rare cases in which the patients delivered male and female infants that were dizygotic twins (DZT) despite single embryo transfer. Case 1: The patient was a 35-year-old woman with a 9-year history of unexplained infertility. In an oocyte retrieval cycle, one blastocyst was transferred; at 26 weeks of gestation, she delivered a 704-g female infant and a 420-g male infant by cesarean section. Because both infants were of extremely low birth weight, they were placed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Congenital anomalies were not found in either infant. Case 2: The patient was a 30-year-old woman with a 1-year history of infertility. Hysterosalpingogram revealed bilateral tubal occlusion. In a frozen/thawed cycle one blastocyst was transferred during her natural ovulation cycle. She achieved a pregnancy and delivered a 2,877-g female infant and a 2,544-g male infant at 36 weeks of gestation by cesarean section. The female infant was diagnosed with a neural tube defect. No congenital anomalies were detected in the male infant. We hypothesize that the DZTs might have been the result of concurrent embryo transfer and natural ovulation and intercourse. © 2010 Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine. Source

Discover hidden collaborations