Ivrea Community Hospital

Ivrea, Italy

Ivrea Community Hospital

Ivrea, Italy
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Cozzarini C.,San Raffaele Scientific Institute | Rancati T.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Palorini F.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Avuzzi B.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | And 11 more authors.
Radiotherapy and Oncology | Year: 2017

Background and purpose: Urinary incontinence following radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer (PCa) has a relevant impact on patient's quality of life. The aim of the study was to assess the unknown dose-effect relationship for late patient-reported urinary incontinence (LPRUI). Methods and materials: Patients were enrolled within the multi-centric study DUE01. Clinical and dosimetry data including the prescribed 2. Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) were prospectively collected. LPRUI was evaluated through the ICIQ-SF questionnaire filled in by the patients at RT start/end and therefore every 6. months. Patients were treated with conventional (74-80. Gy, 1.8-2. Gy/fr) or moderately hypo-fractionated RT (65-75.2. Gy, 2.2-2.7. Gy/fr) in 5 fractions/week with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Six different end-points of 3-year LPRUI, including or not patient's perception (respectively, subjective and objective end-points), were considered. Multivariable logistic models were developed for each end-point. Results: Data of 298 patients were analyzed. The incidence of the most severe end-point (ICIQ-SF. >. 12) was 5.1%. EQD2 calculated with alpha-beta = 0.8. Gy showed the best performance in fitting data: the risk of LPRUI markedly increased for EQD2. >. 80. Gy. Previous abdominal/pelvic surgery and previous TURP were the clinical factors more significantly predictive of LPRUI. Models showed excellent performances in terms of goodness-of-fit and calibration, confirmed by bootstrap-based internal validation. When included in the analyses, baseline symptoms were a major predictor for 5 out of six end-points. Conclusions: LPRUI after RT for PCa dramatically depends on EQD2 and few clinical factors. Results are consistent with a larger than expected impact of moderate hypo-fractionation on the risk of LPRUI. As expected, baseline symptoms, as captured by ICIQ-SF, are associated to an increased risk of LPRUI. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | University of Turin, Ivrea Community Hospital, A.S.L. TO and Local Health Authority Turin 4 Asl To4
Type: Journal Article | Journal: La Radiologia medica | Year: 2016

To evaluate the usefulness of a contouring course in reducing inter- and intraobserver variability in the definition of the larynx as organ at risk (OAR).Within the Rete Oncologica Piemonte-Valle dAosta network, a contouring course focusing on larynx delineation was proposed. Twenty-six radiotherapist technicians (RTTs) experienced in delineating OARs were asked to contour larynx before and after the training. An expert radiation oncologist defined the reference volume for educational purpose. The contoured volumes obtained before and after the course were compared using descriptive statistics (mean value, standard deviation-SD, and coefficient of variation-COV) of volumes and maximum diameters. Conformity index (CI), dice coefficient (DC), and percentage of overlap were used to evaluate the spatial accuracy of the different volumes compared to the reference. Further analysis regarding the variation in the centre of mass (COM) displacement was performed.The mean volume was 40.4cmThis study shows an improvement in larynx definition after the contouring course with lower interobserver variability and major consistency compared to the reference volume. Other specific educational activities may further increase the quality of radiation therapy contouring in this setting.


Franco P.,University of Turin | Mistrangelo M.,University of Turin | Arcadipane F.,University of Turin | Munoz F.,Medical Oncology 1 | And 12 more authors.
Cancer Investigation | Year: 2015

Purpose: To report the 4-year outcomes of a consecutive series of anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemo-radiation delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), employing a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods: A consecutive series of 54 patients was enrolled between 2007 and 2013. Treatment schedule consisted of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions (1.8 Gy daily) to the gross tumor volume, while the elective nodal volumes were prescribed 42 Gy/28 fractions (1.5 Gy/daily) for patients having a cT2N0 disease. Patients with cT3-T4/N0-N3 tumors were prescribed 54 (T3) or 60 (T4) Gy/30 fractions (1.8-2 Gy daily) to the gross tumor volume; gross nodal volumes were prescribed 50.4 Gy/30 fr (1.68 Gy daily) if sized ≤ 3 cm or 54 Gy/30 fr (1.8 Gy daily) if > 3 cm; elective nodal regions were given 45 Gy/30 fractions (1.5 Gy daily). Chemotherapy was administered concurrently according to the Nigro's regimen. Primary endpoint was colostomy-free survival (CFS). Secondary endpoints were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity profile. Results: Median follow up was 32.6 months (range 12-84). The actuarial probability of being alive at 4 years without a colostomy (CFS) was 68.9% (95% CI: 50.3%-84.7%). Actuarial 4-year OS, CSS, DFS, and LC were 77.7% (95% CI: 60.7-88.1%), 81.5% (95% CI: 64%-91%), 65.5% (95% CI: 47.7%-78.5%), and 84.6% (95% CI: 71.6%-92%). Actuarial 4-year metastasis-free survival was 74.4% (95% CI: 55.5%-86.2%). Maximum detected acute toxicities were as follows: dermatologic -G3: 13%; GI-G3: 8%; GU-G3: 2%; anemia-G3: 2%; neutropenia-G3:11%; G4: 2%; thrombocytopenia- G3:2%. Four-year G2 chronic toxicity rates were 2.5% (95% CI: 3.6-16.4) for GU, 14.4% (95% CI: 7.1-28) for GI, 3.9% (95% CI: 1%-14.5%) for skin, and 4.2% (95% CI: 1.1-15.9) for genitalia. Conclusions: Our study shows the feasibility of IMRT in the combined modality treatment of anal cancer, with comparable results to the literature with respect to LC, sphincter preservation and survival. Acute toxicity is lower if compared to series employing standard techniques. Our results support the use of IMRT on a routine basis for the treatment of anal cancer. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Cante D.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Franco P.,Ospedale Regionale U. Parini | Sciacero P.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Girelli G.,Ivrea Community Hospital | And 11 more authors.
Medical Oncology | Year: 2013

Accelerated hypofractionation (HF) using larger dose per fraction, delivered in fewer fractions over a shorter overall treatment time, is presently a consistent possibility for adjuvant whole breast radiation (WBRT) after breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer (EBC). Between 2005 and 2008, we submitted 375 consecutive patients to accelerated hypofractionated WBRT after breast-conserving surgery for EBC. The basic course of radiation consisted of 45 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks to the whole breast (2.25 Gy daily) with an additional daily concomitant boost of 0.25 Gy up to 50 Gy to the surgical bed. Overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), disease-free survival (DFS) and local control (LC) were assessed. Late toxicity was scored according to the CTCAE v3.0; acute toxicity using the RTOG/EORTC toxicity scale. Cosmesis was assessed comparing treated and untreated breast. Quality of life (QoL) was determined using EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. With a median follow-up of 60 months (range 42-88), 5 years OS, CSS, DFS and LC were 97.6, 99.4, 96.6 and 100 %, respectively. Late skin and subcutaneous toxicity was generally mild, with few events > grade 2 observed. Cosmetic results were excellent in 75.7 % of patients, good in 20 % and fair in 4.3 %. QoL, assessed both through QLQ-C30/QLQ-BR23, was generally favorable, within the functioning and symptoms domains. Our study is another proof of principle that HF WBRT with a concurrent boost dose to the surgical cavity represents a safe and effective postoperative treatment modality with excellent local control and survival, consistent cosmetic results and mild toxicity. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Franco P.,University of Turin | Cante D.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Sciacero P.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Girelli G.,Ivrea Community Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Breast Care | Year: 2015

Radiation therapy delivered with hypofractionation, which involves the delivery of a higher dose per fraction in fewer fractions (generally with a lower total nominal dose) over a shorter overall treatment time, is an established therapeutic option at least for a selected group of early breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery. Optimal delivery of the tumor bed boost dose in terms of timing, fractionation, and total dose whenever a hypofractionated schedule is employed has yet to be established. We herein present a review of the current evidence on the role of boost integration in whole breast radiotherapy. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.


PubMed | University of Turin and Ivrea Community Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tumori | Year: 2016

To report the 5- and 10-year results of accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with concomitant boost to the tumor bed in 83 consecutive patients with early breast cancer aged >70 years.All patients were treated with breast conservation and hypofractionated WBRT. The prescription dose to the whole breast was 45 Gy (2.25 Gy/20 fractions) with an additional daily concomitant boost of 0.25 Gy to the surgical cavity (2.5 Gy/20 fractions up to 50 Gy). The maximum detected toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We considered as skin toxicity: erythema, edema, desquamation, ulceration, hemorrhage, necrosis, telangiectasia, fibrosis-induration, hyperpigmentation, retraction and atrophy. Cosmetic results were assessed as set by the Harvard criteria.With a median follow-up of 60 months (range 36-88), no local recurrence was observed. The maximum detected acute skin toxicity was G0 in 57% of patients, G1 in 40% and G2 in 3%. Late skin and subcutaneous toxicity was generally mild with no G3 events. The cosmetic results were excellent in 69% of patients, good in 22%, fair in 5%, and poor in 4%.The present results support the use of hypofractionation employing a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity in women aged >70 years. This is a convenient treatment option for both this type of population and health-care providers.


PubMed | University of Turin and Ivrea Community Hospital
Type: | Journal: Tumori | Year: 2016

The purpose of this article is to discuss the current role of radiation therapy in vulvar cancer and especially to review the recent literature relative to the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in disease management. Owing to the low incidence of vulvar cancer, at present there are no available results of cooperative prospective trials. As evidenced in dosimetric and preliminary retrospective clinical studies, the use of IMRT has resulted in superior normal tissue sparing and lower rates of acute and chronic toxicities compared to previous studies that used conventional approaches. Data on long-term outcomes in these patients remain limited.


Cante D.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Rosa La Porta M.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Casanova-Borca V.,Ivrea Community Hospital | Sciacero P.,Ivrea Community Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Breast Journal | Year: 2011

The current standard therapeutic option for early stage breast cancer (EBC) employs a multimodality treatment approach including conservative surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. The most common adjuvant radiotherapeutic strategy consists of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) delivered to the whole breast using 1.8-2 Gy fractions given five times a week, up to a total dose of 45-50 Gy over a period of 5 weeks. In recent years, altered schedules employing larger dose per fraction delivered in fewer treatment sessions over a shorter overall treatment time began to be explored. We herein present clinical data on accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy delivered on a daily basis for a total treatment time of 20 fractions. Between February 2005 and June 2009, a total of 463 patients underwent hypofractionated accelerated adjuvant radiation after conservative surgery for early breast cancer (pathological stage pTis, pT1 or pT2, pN0-N1). The basic course of radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy, to the whole breast in 20 fractions with 2.25 Gy/fraction; an additional daily boost dose of 0.25 Gy was concomitantly delivered, to the lumpectomy cavity, for an additional total dose of 5 Gy. The cumulative nominal dose was 50 Gy. At follow-up, patients were examined at 3 and 6 months after the end of radiotherapy and twice a year afterward. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group /European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity scale. Cosmetic results were assessed in agreement with the Harvard criteria. All the 463 patients treated with the accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy schedule achieved at least 6 months' follow-up and subsequently were considered for the present analysis. With a median follow-up of 27 months, 5-year DFS is 93.1%. Only three patients experienced disease recurrence: two of them with an axillary nodal relapse; one patient with systemic spread. No local relapse occurred. No major toxicities (grade 3 or more) were detected during follow-up. Only 2% of the patients experienced grade 3 skin toxicity at the very end of the radiotherapy course. Cosmetic result was assessed and scored at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years: 100% of patients showed excellent or good cosmetic result. The explored accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant radiotherapeutic approach for early breast cancer with concomitant photon boost seems to be feasible providing consistent clinical results with excellent short-to-medium-term toxicity profile. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


To report the four-year outcomes of accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with a concomitant boost (CB) to the tumor bed in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), we performed a subgroup analysis of 103 patients affected with DCIS within a cohort of 960 early breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation and hypofractionated WBRT. Prescription dose to the whole breast was 45 Gy (2.25 Gy/20 fractions) with an additional daily CB of 0.25 Gy to the surgical cavity (2.5 Gy/20 fractions up to 50 Gy). With a median follow-up of 48 months (range 12-91), no local recurrence was observed. Maximum detected acute skin toxicity was as follows: G0 in 35 % of patients, G1 in 54 %, G2 in 9 % and G3 in 2 %. Late skin and subcutaneous toxicity were generally mild with only 1 % of patients experiencing ≥G3 events (telangiectasia). No major lung and heart toxicity were detected. Cosmetic results were excellent in 50 % of patients, good in 37 %, fair in 9 % and poor in 4 %. Quality of life had a generally favorable profile both within the functioning and symptoms domains. The present result supports the hypothesis that DCIS patients could be safely treated with a hypofractionated schedule employing a CB to the lumpectomy cavity.


The current standard therapeutic option for early stage breast cancer (EBC) employs a multimodality treatment approach including conservative surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. The most common adjuvant radiotherapeutic strategy consists of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) delivered to the whole breast using 1.8-2 Gy fractions given five times a week, up to a total dose of 45-50 Gy over a period of 5 weeks. In recent years, altered schedules employing larger dose per fraction delivered in fewer treatment sessions over a shorter overall treatment time began to be explored. We herein present clinical data on accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy delivered on a daily basis for a total treatment time of 20 fractions. Between February 2005 and June 2009, a total of 463 patients underwent hypofractionated accelerated adjuvant radiation after conservative surgery for early breast cancer (pathological stage pTis, pT1 or pT2, pN0-N1). The basic course of radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy, to the whole breast in 20 fractions with 2.25 Gy/fraction; an additional daily boost dose of 0.25 Gy was concomitantly delivered, to the lumpectomy cavity, for an additional total dose of 5 Gy. The cumulative nominal dose was 50 Gy. At follow-up, patients were examined at 3 and 6 months after the end of radiotherapy and twice a year afterward. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group /European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity scale. Cosmetic results were assessed in agreement with the Harvard criteria. All the 463 patients treated with the accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy schedule achieved at least 6 months follow-up and subsequently were considered for the present analysis. With a median follow-up of 27 months, 5-year DFS is 93.1%. Only three patients experienced disease recurrence: two of them with an axillary nodal relapse; one patient with systemic spread. No local relapse occurred. No major toxicities (grade 3 or more) were detected during follow-up. Only 2% of the patients experienced grade 3 skin toxicity at the very end of the radiotherapy course. Cosmetic result was assessed and scored at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years: 100% of patients showed excellent or good cosmetic result. The explored accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant radiotherapeutic approach for early breast cancer with concomitant photon boost seems to be feasible providing consistent clinical results with excellent short-to-medium-term toxicity profile.

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