IVF Laboratory

Cluj-Napoca, Romania

IVF Laboratory

Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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Kasapi E.,Iakentro Fertility Center | Kasapi E.,Democritus University of Thrace | Asimakopoulos B.,Democritus University of Thrace | Chatzimeletiou K.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2017

Background: The use of immature oocytes derived from stimulated cycles could be of great importance, particularly for urgent fertility preservation cases. The current study aimed to determine whether in vitro maturation (IVM) was more successful before or after vitrification of these oocytes. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed in a private in vitro fertilization (IVF) center. We collected 318 germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes from 104 stimulated oocyte donation cycles. Oocytes were divided into two groups according to whether vitrification was applied at the GV stage (group 1) or in vitro matured to the metaphase II (Mil) stage and then vitrified (group 2). In the control group (group 3), oocytes were in vitro matured without vitrification. In all three groups, we assessed survival rate after warming, maturation rate, and MII-spindle/chromosome configurations. The chi-square test was used to compare rates between the three groups. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05 and we used Bonferroni criterion to assess statistical significance regarding the various pairs of groups. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 was used to perform statistical analysis. Results: There was no significant difference in the survival rate after vitrification and warming of GV (93.5%) and Mil oocytes (90.8%). A significantly higher maturation rate occurred when IVM was performed before vitrification (82.9%) compared to after vitrification (51%). There was no significant difference in the incidence of normal spindle/ chromosome configurations among warmed oocytes matured in vitro before (50.0%) or after (41.2%) vitrification. However, a higher incidence of normal spindle/chromosome configurations existed in the in vitro matured oocytes which were not subjected to vitrification (fresh oocytes, 77.9%). Conclusion: In stimulated cycles, vitrification of in vitro matured MII oocytes rather than GV oocytes seems to be more efficient. This approach needs to be verified in nonstimulated fertility preservation cases. © 2017, Royan Institute (ACECR). All rights reserved.


Pasquier C.,Toulouse University Hospital Center | Andreutti C.,Laboratory Of Clinique Of La Source | Bertrand E.,IVF Laboratory | Bostan A.,Human Reproduction Research Laboratory | And 13 more authors.
Journal of Medical Virology | Year: 2012

Detection of HIV-1 RNA in semen is used commonly to determine the safety of semen processing procedures before assisted reproductive technology (ART). Using two panels of prepared semen samples containing HIV-1 the performances of protocols from 14 centers have been compared. No false-positive results were detected but false-negative results were frequent when the concentration was below 500 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml of seminal plasma. Frequency of HIV-1 RNA detection was higher on seminal cells than on seminal plasma. Assays (or protocols) for quantifying HIV-1 RNA in semen performed less well than standardized blood plasma assays. The HIV load in seminal plasma could be a useful marker of the risk of sexual transmission of the virus. Its use as a marker of global HAART efficiency in the HIV reservoir needs further study. Standardized assays are required for detection and measurement of HIV-1 RNA in semen samples. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | IVF Laboratory and University of Pretoria
Type: | Journal: Applied & translational genomics | Year: 2016

The use of mitochondrial transfer as a clinic procedure is drawing closer to reality. Here we provide a detailed overview of mitochondrial transfer techniques - both established and recent - including pronuclear, spindle, ooplasmic and blastomere transfer. Reasons as to why some techniques are more suitable for the prevention of mitochondrial DNA disease than others, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each methodology, are discussed. The possible clinical introduction of these techniques has raised concerns about the adverse effects they may have on resultant embryos and offspring. Success rates of each technique, embryo viability and developmental consequences post mitochondrial transfer are addressed through analysis of evidence obtained from both animal and human studies. Counterarguments against potential mitochondrial-nuclear genome incompatibility are also provided. Additional clinical applications of mitochondrial transfer techniques are discussed. These include the rescue or enhancement of fertility in women of advanced maternal age or those suffering from diabetes. An alternative to using mitochondrial DNA transfer for germ line therapies is the therapeutic use of somatic cell nuclear transfer for the generation of personalised stem cells. Although ethically challenging, this method could offer patients already suffering from mitochondrial DNA diseases a novel treatment option.


Ortega C.,Free University of Brussels | Verheyen G.,Free University of Brussels | Raick D.,IVF Laboratory | Camus M.,Free University of Brussels | And 2 more authors.
Human Reproduction Update | Year: 2011

Background: Complete asthenozoospermia, i.e. 100% immotile spermatozoa in the ejaculate, is reported at a frequency of 1 of 5000 men. Its diagnosis implies a poor fertility prognosis even with ICSI. It is extremely important to distinguish between two different groups of patients with complete asthenozoospermia, i.e. virtual or absolute asthenozoospermia. With the former group having some motile spermatozoa after extensive processing of the semen, absolute asthenozoospermia can be associated with metabolic deficiencies, ultrastructural abnormalities of the sperm flagellum, necrozoospermia otherwise it can be idiopathic. In the management of persistent absolute asthenozoospermia, it is very important to elucidate its nature and whenever possible to correct the potential causes. Methods: We reported data published in the literature on the aetiology of absolute asthenozoospermia and the different techniques to improve ICSI outcome. We propose an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Results: Different results regarding fertilization, cleavage and pregnancy rate have been published in patients with absolute asthenozoospermia undergoing ICSI. However, the results vary widely depending on the sperm origin and the technique applied for immotile sperm selection. The percentage of viable spermatozoa varies between 0 and 100%. Conclusions: Absolute immotile spermatozoa is one of the most important causes of reduced fertilization and pregnancy rates after ICSI and different techniques are used to improve ICSI outcomes. However, it still remains unclear which is the best technique to improve the pregnancy outcomes in these couples. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

TransferMan NK2 From Eppendorf is a product used in IVF Laboratory and is the best micromanipulators for IVF / ICSI procedures. The Eppendorf TransferMan NK2 is used routinely for microinjection of DNA into the pronucleus of zygotes and injection of embryonic stem cells into blastocysts. Operating the TransferMan NK 2 micromanipulator, with its few self-explanatory keys, is extremely simple.


Truta Z.,Babes - Bolyai University | Truta Z.,Cluj Clinic Hospital | Truta M.,Cluj Clinic Hospital | Micu R.,IVF Laboratory
Romanian Biotechnological Letters | Year: 2012

Free energy released from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate is required for spermatozoa movement, and the spermatozoa velocity is influenced by magnetic field. Since glucose is necessary for maintenance of optimal adenosine triphosphate levels, a question arises: is the human spermatozoa glucose consumption influenced by zero magnetic field conditions? The effect of zero magnetic field on human semen glucose consumption was investigated in connection with the main natural fertilization parameters: viability and motility of spermatozoa cells. We report, for the first time, that human spermatozoa glucose consumption is accelerated in vitro in zero magnetic field conditions. © 2012 University of Bucharest.


Truta Z.,Babes - Bolyai University | Truta Z.,IVF Laboratory | Garlovanu M.,IVF Laboratory | Lerintiu S.,IVF Laboratory | Micu R.,IVF Laboratory
Romanian Biotechnological Letters | Year: 2010

A UV-VIS spectrophotometric method was developed for fast human semen glucose concentration evaluation. Thirty human sperm samples, known to be with normozoospermia, were considered for measurements, and a simple method to analyze the concentration of glucose in human sperm was developed. Our results show that human semen glucose concentration measurements are feasible using a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. We determined the average glucose concentration in normozoospermic human semen as 47.17±4.13 mg/100mL. Though the sensitivity of the assay is similar to other chemical reagents techniques, such as glucose oxidase (GO), this assay allows an added flexibility in working range and instrumentation. © 2010 University of Bucharest.


De Los Santos M.J.,IVF Laboratory | Ruiz A.,IVI Valencia
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2013

In view of the increasing emphasis being placed on patient safety and quality health care, it is extremely important to develop fail-safe mechanisms to prevent assisted reproductive technology (ART) mix-ups. Sample mismatch is the most undesirable event that can occur in an IVF laboratory as it may have catastrophic consequences for both patients and health care professionals. Many strategies can be adopted to reduce laboratory errors, such as improved quality control and quality assessment, certification, educational programs, and external quality assessment. Nevertheless, none suffices to absolutely prevent this error. Therefore, the implementation of specific policies, such as double-checking safety protocols, is receiving more and more interest. After some adverse events involving sample misidentification occurred in some countries, double-checking every step of the IVF clinical and laboratory procedure has become mandatory. However, double-checking protocols can also prove difficult to implement and a new generation of errors may occur. Other approaches, including electronic strategies for tracking, and even microlabeling embryos, are currently being evaluated. © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Published by Elsevier Inc.


Orris J.J.,IVF Laboratory | Taylor T.H.,IVF Laboratory | Gilchrist J.W.,IVF Laboratory | Hallowell S.V.,IVF Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2010

Purpose: To determine if embryo banking with PGS is more optimal than proceeding with PGS regardless of embryo number. Methods: Patients were divided into 2 groups, group 1 were those that banked embryos and proceeded through another round of IVF prior to PGS, and group 2 underwent PGS regardless of embryo number. Group 2 was divided into group 2A (patients with >10 embryos) and group 2B (patients who had <10 embryos). Results: There was no difference in embryos biopsied, normal embryos, number transferred, and pregnancy rate between group 1 and 2. A significant number of patients did not have a transfer in group 2B (6/11) compared to group 1 (3/19) (P = 0.0419). There was no significance between pregnancy rates per transfer between group 1 (6/16) and group 2B (2/5). Conclusion: Our data suggests that banking will increase the odds of going to transfer but there was no increase in pregnancy rates. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


PubMed | IVF Laboratory
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of assisted reproduction and genetics | Year: 2010

to determine if embryo banking with PGS is more optimal than proceeding with PGS regardless of embryo number.patients were divided into 2 groups, group 1 were those that banked embryos and proceeded through another round of IVF prior to PGS, and group 2 underwent PGS regardless of embryo number. Group 2 was divided into group 2A (patients with >10 embryos) and group 2B (patients who had <10 embryos).there was no difference in embryos biopsied, normal embryos, number transferred, and pregnancy rate between group 1 and 2. A significant number of patients did not have a transfer in group 2B (6/11) compared to group 1 (3/19) (P = 0.0419). There was no significance between pregnancy rates per transfer between group 1 (6/16) and group 2B (2/5).our data suggests that banking will increase the odds of going to transfer but there was no increase in pregnancy rates.

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