Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg

Salzburg, Austria

Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg

Salzburg, Austria

Time filter

Source Type

Spitzer D.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg | Haidbauer R.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg | Corn C.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg | Stadler J.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2012

Background: To analyze the effects of embryo transfer (ET) quality on clinical pregnancy (CPR) and live birth delivery rates (LBDR). Methods: In a retrospective study at a single, private infertility center between November 2005 and December 2009 one thousand fifty-five day-3 and day-5 ETs following IVF/ICSI/IMSI were evaluated. We analyzed the impact of an atraumatic ET with a soft catheter (ET 1), after external guidance (ET 2), after probing of the cervix with a stylet (ET 3), or after grasping the portio vaginalis with a tenaculum (ET 4) on CPR and LBDR. Results: The use of external guidance showed a significantly reduced LBDR as compared to an atraumatic ET (26.0% vs. 32.5%). The lowest CPR and LBDR were found in ET 4. The application of stylets in cases of difficult ETs was superior to the use of external guidance. No differences in miscarriages between ET 1-4 were noted. Conclusions: Besides embryo culture and patient history, the quality of an ET might also have an important impact on pregnancy outcome. Techniques to ensure an atraumatic ET, such as mechanic uterine cavity length measurements, before starting treatment might help identify patients at risk for a difficult ET and lead to modified treatments, such as the primary use of a stylet. Limitation of study: retrospective analysis © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Wirleitner B.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz | Vanderzwalmen P.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz | Vanderzwalmen P.,Center Hospitalier Inter Regional Cavell | Bach M.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz | And 8 more authors.
Human Reproduction | Year: 2013

STUDY QUESTIONDoes the storage time of vitrified human blastocysts negatively impact their survival, the implantation potential of embryos or the malformation rate of babies born?SUMMARY ANSWERThere was no evidence that storage times of up to 6 years after vitrification (VIT) had a negative impact on blastocyst survival, the implantation potential of embryos or the malformation rate of babies born.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADYAlthough several thousand children have been born after blastocyst VIT, many aspects of this technique remain to be elucidated. New applications, such as fertility preservation, lead to long storage times of vitrified gametes or embryos but it remains to be determined if these vitrified embryos are stable over time.STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATIONA retrospective study including 603 transfers was conducted between January 2009 and April 2012. Blastocysts were vitrified using a closed system.PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODSAll patients underwent the transfer of aseptically vitrified/warmed blastocysts in a cryo-cycle. A total of 1077 blastocysts were transferred. Survival rates (SRs), implantation potential, birth rates and characteristics of the children born were evaluated.MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCEWe found that the storage of vitrified blastocysts in aseptic conditions neither impaired blastocyst viability (SR after warming during the first year of storage was 83.0% compared with 83.1% after 5-6 years of storage: NS) nor decreased pregnancy rates (clinical pregnancy rate after 1 year of storage was 40.0 versus 38.5% after 6 years: NS). In addition, no increase in the malformation rate over time was observed.LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTIONOur study only included the transfer of blastocysts which had been vitrified aseptically (i.e. using a closed system). Therefore, our results might not be applicable to 'open' VIT systems. The long-term follow-up of children born will be necessary to confirm our findings.WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGSThe results suggest that vitrified human blastocysts can be stored for long periods of time without significant negative consequences for the offspring. Therefore, the method should be of benefit to those patients who need to consider taking measures for fertility preservation.STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S)No external funding was sought for this study and the authors have no conflict of interest to declare. © 2013 © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.


Stecher A.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz | Vanderzwalmen P.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz | Vanderzwalmen P.,Center Hospitalier Inter Regional Edith Cavell | Zintz M.,Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz | And 4 more authors.
Reproductive BioMedicine Online | Year: 2014

Time-lapse imaging is increasingly applied as an adjunct to reproductive medicine. The gained information of the morphological and morphokinetic variables before the onset of transcription are supposed to be good predictors for the selection of the best embryo for transfer and are often seen in line with clinical outcomes. This retrospective case series investigated the outcome of transferred blastocysts that did not fulfil the proposed embryo scores at early cleavage or at later stages of development. The observations were made by time-lapse imaging. This study reports the birth of 16 healthy children after day-5 blastocyst transfer, of which at least one of the transferred embryos originated from deviant morphology and/or kinetic cleavage patterns. This case series suggests that some blastocysts derived from embryos with poor conventional morphological score and/or suboptimal morphokinetics can be successfully transferred and might result in live births. Such results might raise awareness that discarding embryos based only on early events is not a suitable approach to give patients the chance to conceive. In conclusion, to date only the transfer of viable embryos after culturing them until day 5 guarantees optimal embryo selection and helps to prevent embryo wastage. In assisted reproduction treatment, the overall success rates are still low. Optimal embryo selection is essential for IVF therapy to provide the highest chances for implantation. Therefore, several models were postulated for prediction of embryo quality. Many strategies have been applied, focusing on oocyte, zygote and early cleavage-stage morphology in a static manner. With the implementation of time-lapse technology, the information that is available in regard to embryonic development has increased tremendously. Thus, new morphokinetic markers have been established as embryo selection criteria. However, this brings the danger of wasting low-scored embryos. We here report the birth of several healthy babies after transfer of day-5 embryos that originated from oocytes or embryos that did not fulfil the morphokinetic criteria. With regard to the high costs of an IVF cycle and the emotional stress for the patient, surplus embryos should not be discarded but cryopreserved for transfer in another IVF cycle. Although the likelihood of pregnancy is lower compared to normal-scored embryos, there is still a chance of reaching blastocyst stage and successful implantation. According to our experience, the best option regarding embryo selection is still embryo culture until day 5. © 2013, Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg, Ivf Centers Prof Zech Bregenz and Center Hospitalier Inter Regional Edith Cavell
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Reproductive biomedicine online | Year: 2014

Time-lapse imaging is increasingly applied as an adjunct to reproductive medicine. The gained information of the morphological and morphokinetic variables before the onset of transcription are supposed to be good predictors for the selection of the best embryo for transfer and are often seen in line with clinical outcomes. This retrospective case series investigated the outcome of transferred blastocysts that did not fulfil the proposed embryo scores at early cleavage or at later stages of development. The observations were made by time-lapse imaging. This study reports the birth of 16 healthy children after day-5 blastocyst transfer, of which at least one of the transferred embryos originated from deviant morphology and/or kinetic cleavage patterns. This case series suggests that some blastocysts derived from embryos with poor conventional morphological score and/or suboptimal morphokinetics can be successfully transferred and might result in live births. Such results might raise awareness that discarding embryos based only on early events is not a suitable approach to give patients the chance to conceive. In conclusion, to date only the transfer of viable embryos after culturing them until day 5 guarantees optimal embryo selection and helps to prevent embryo wastage.


PubMed | Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of assisted reproduction and genetics | Year: 2012

To analyze the effects of embryo transfer (ET) quality on clinical pregnancy (CPR) and live birth delivery rates (LBDR).In a retrospective study at a single, private infertility center between November 2005 and December 2009 one thousand fifty-five day-3 and day-5 ETs following IVF/ICSI/IMSI were evaluated. We analyzed the impact of an atraumatic ET with a soft catheter (ET 1), after external guidance (ET 2), after probing of the cervix with a stylet (ET 3), or after grasping the portio vaginalis with a tenaculum (ET 4) on CPR and LBDR.The use of external guidance showed a significantly reduced LBDR as compared to an atraumatic ET (26.0% vs. 32.5%). The lowest CPR and LBDR were found in ET 4. The application of stylets in cases of difficult ETs was superior to the use of external guidance. No differences in miscarriages between ET 1-4 were noted.Besides embryo culture and patient history, the quality of an ET might also have an important impact on pregnancy outcome. Techniques to ensure an atraumatic ET, such as mechanic uterine cavity length measurements, before starting treatment might help identify patients at risk for a difficult ET and lead to modified treatments, such as the primary use of a stylet. Limitation of study: retrospective analysis.

Loading Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg collaborators
Loading Ivf Centers Prof Zech Salzburg collaborators