Overland Park, KS, United States
Overland Park, KS, United States

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Surek C.C.,OMS IV | Dougherty J.J.,University of Missouri - Kansas City | Stephens R.E.,OMS IV
Journal of the American Osteopathic Association | Year: 2011

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee and the function of its anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles are a focus of orthopedic research. Because of the probability that third-year and fourth-year osteopathic medical students will encounter ACL injuries during clinical rotations, it is of paramount importance that students fully understand the functions of the AM and PL bundles as 2 distinct functional components of the ACL. The authors assess the degree to which the AM and PL bundles are discussed within basic science curricula at colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs). In September 2008, a 6-question survey addressing various aspects of ACL education was mailed to instructors of lower-extremity anatomy at all 28 COMs that existed at that time. Nine of the 21 responding institutions (42.9%) indicated that both the AM and PL bundles of the ACL are discussed within their basic science curricula. Four of these 9 COMs indicated that their instruction mentions that the bundles are parallel in extension and crossed in flexion. Nine of the 21 responding COMs (42.9%) indicated that they instruct students that the AM bundle is a major anterior-posterior restrictor, and 12 (57.1%) indicated that they instruct students that the PL bundle is the major rotational stabilizer of the ACL. In 7 of the 21 responding COMs (33.3%), the AM and PL bundles are identified via direct visualization during anatomic dissection of the ACL. The authors conclude that their findings suggest the need for enhanced presentation of the AM and PL bundles within the basic science curricula at COMs to provide osteopathic medical students with a more comprehensive education in anatomy.


PubMed | OMS IV
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association | Year: 2014

Colonic varices, usually detected by means of colonoscopy, are extremely rare and typically indicative of portal hypertension or chronic hepatopathology. Even more rare are those cases with no underlying disease, or idiopathic colonic varices. The authors report a case of these unexplained varices found during colonoscopy of a 30-year-old man with a 10-year history of diarrhea and occasional bloody stool. A thorough workup was performed, revealing no underlying abnormalities for his varices. Additionally, the authors review the literature of this rare diagnosis. Physicians must rule out hepatic, vascular, and cardiac causes before classifying a case of varices as idiopathic.


PubMed | OMS IV
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association | Year: 2013

The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with hormone level concerns 6 months after a rock climbing accident that resulted in paraplegia. Hypogonadism was diagnosed, and the patient received subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy. Within 6 months, the patient had substantial improvement in muscle function and was able to take several steps with the assistance of crutches or a walker. This case highlights the potential improvement in quality of life and overall prognosis resulting from the subcutaneous pellet form of testosterone when used as part of the overall treatment plan in such patients. Considering the overwhelming preponderance of hypogonadism in men with spinal cord injuries, the standard of care for such patients should include screening, laboratory hormone evaluation, and prompt treatment for testosterone deficiency.

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