ITZ

Hannover, Germany
Hannover, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

InventHelp, a leading inventor service company, is submitting ITZ YOUR COLOR to appropriate companies for their review.(PRWeb March 31, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/InventHelp-Inventions/Itz-Your-Color/prweb14200937.htm


NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR THROUGH UNITED STATES NEWSWIRE SERVICES PharmaCan Capital Corp., doing business as Cronos Group (TSX VENTURE: MJN) ("Cronos Group" or "the Company"), is pleased to announce the closing of its previously announced acquisition of approximately 17 acres of land adjacent to the existing campus of its wholly-owned subsidiary In the Zone Produce Ltd. ("ITZ") in the Okanagan Valley, BC (the "Property"). An artesian well on the Property, with the capacity to pump 200+ gallons per minute, will provide a free source of on-site water for the production facility. "We are pleased to be able to more than double our existing footprint at ITZ. This additional land ensures we have enough space for our upcoming expansion plans, which will be crucial to ensure that we are able to meet the coming recreational demand and execute our strategic vision for the ITZ platform," said Mike Gorenstein, Chief Executive Officer of Cronos Group. PharmaCan Capital Corp., known as the Cronos Group, is a holding company for licensed producers under Canada's Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations ("ACMPR"). With interests in five licensed producers and three license applicants, Cronos Group is focused on building iconic brands providing patients with compassionate, personalized care. The Peace Naturals Project Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, is licensed to produce up to 2,500 kg of medical marijuana per year and is located on 95-acres of land in Ontario. Peace's current grow facilities of approximately 38,000 square feet. The Company also has stakes in: Whistler Medical Marijuana Corporation, ABcann Medicinals Inc., Hydropothecary, Evergreen, Vert Medical, and Cannmart. For more information, please visit www.TheCronosGroup.com. About In The Zone Produce Ltd. The Company's second wholly-owned subsidiary, In the Zone Produce Ltd., is a Licensed Producer of medical marihuana under Canada's ACMPR program. ITZ is licensed to produce up to 100 kg of medical marijuana per year and is located on 31 acres of land in the Okanagan Valley, British Columbia. For more information, please visit http://www.InTheZoneProduce.com. This news release may contain "forward-looking information" and "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. All information contained herein that is not clearly historical in nature may constitute forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by management, are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive risks, uncertainties and contingencies that may cause actual financial results, performance or achievements to be materially different from the estimated future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by those forward-looking statements and the forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. Except as required by law, the Company disclaims any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. This news release contains information obtained by the Company from third parties and believes such information to be accurate but has not independently verified such information. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

NOT FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES OR THROUGH UNITED STATES NEWSWIRE PharmaCan Capital Corp., doing business as Cronos Group (TSX VENTURE: MJN) ("Cronos" or the "Company") is pleased to provide the first operational update related to its portfolio of licensed producers ("LPs") and ACMPR applicants since installing new executive management and consolidating our ownership in The Peace Naturals Project Inc. ("Peace Naturals") on September 6, 2016. Cronos also announced its third quarter financial results and accompanying management discussion and analysis for the period ended September 30, 2016; copies of which are available on the Company's website (www.thecronosgroup.com) and have been filed and are available on SEDAR (www.sedar.com). "While the trailing quarterly results reflect just the first 24 days of our consolidated ownership of Peace Naturals, the new Cronos team has been working tirelessly towards optimizing our operating companies, streamlining our financial investments, re-branding our corporate profile and establishing international distribution channels. We are already realizing encouraging results from these initiatives both domestically and internationally," says Mike Gorenstein, Chief Executive Officer of Cronos. At Peace Naturals, select highlights from ongoing operational changes implemented by new management include: At In the Zone Produce ("ITZ"), select highlights and updates include: "We are very pleased with the success of our ongoing improvements to our domestic cannabis portfolio. Cronos is also excited about the establishment of our international distribution channels. We will continue to rapidly expand our production capacity and strengthen our brands both domestically and in additional international jurisdictions. This is just the beginning," says Gorenstein. As previously mentioned, the Company recently completed its first co-branded export of medicinal cannabis to German-based Pedanios GmbH ("Pedanios") and is in preparation for an upcoming second shipment. Further, the Company continues to advance negotiations relating to joint ventures and supply agreements in more jurisdictions and will provide details upon successful entry into definitive agreements with these counterparties. Cronos Group, is a geographically diversified and vertically integrated cannabis company that operates two wholly-owned Licensed Producers ("LPs") regulated within Health Canada's Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (the "ACMPR") and holds a portfolio of minority investments in other Licensed Producers and ACMPR applicants. The company's flagship LPs, Peace Naturals Project Inc. (Ontario), and In The Zone Produce Ltd. (British Columbia) are collectively situated on over 125 acres of agricultural land and are currently licensed to produce 2,600 kg of cannabis on an annual basis. The Company also holds minority equity positions in Licensed Producers Whistler Medical Marijuana, Hydropothecary, and Abcann Medicinals. With interest in five Licensed Producers and two LP applicants, Cronos Group is focused on building an iconic brand portfolio, providing patients with compassionate and personalized care, and creating value for our shareholders. This news release may contain "forward-looking information" and "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. All information contained herein that is not clearly historical in nature may constitute forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by management, are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive risks, uncertainties and contingencies that may cause actual financial results, performance or achievements to be materially different from the estimated future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by those forward-looking statements and the forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. Except as required by law, the Company disclaims any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. This news release contains information obtained by the Company from third parties and believes such information to be accurate but has not independently verified such information. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. For more information, please visit www.thecronosgroup.com.


Simon S.,ITZ | Simon S.,American Museum of Natural History | Narechania A.,American Museum of Natural History | DeSalle R.,American Museum of Natural History | And 2 more authors.
Genome Biology and Evolution | Year: 2012

The evolution of the diverse insect lineages is one of the most fascinating issues in evolutionary biology. Despite extensive research in this area, the resolution of insect phylogeny especially of interordinal relationships has turned out to be still a great challenge. One of the challenges for insect systematics is the radiation of the polyneopteran lineages with several contradictory and/or unresolved relationships. Here, we provide the first transcriptomic data for three enigmatic polyneopteran orders (Dermaptera, Plecoptera, and Zoraptera) to clarify one of the most debated issues among higher insect systematics. We applied different approaches to generate 3 data sets comprising 78 species and 1,579 clusters of orthologous genes. Using these three matrices, we explored several key mechanistic problems of phylogenetic reconstruction including missing data, matrix selection, gene and taxa number/choice, and the biological function of the genes. Based on the first phylogenomic approach including these three ambiguous polyneopteran orders, we provide here conclusive support for monophyletic Polyneoptera, contesting the hypothesis of Zoraptera+ Paraneoptera and Plecoptera+ remaining Neoptera. In addition, we employ various approaches to evaluate data quality and highlight problematic nodes within the Insect Tree that still exist despite our phylogenomic approach. We further show how the support for these nodes or alternative hypotheses might depend on the taxon-and/or gene-sampling. © 2012 The Author(s).


Damm S.,ITZ | Schierwater B.,ITZ | Schierwater B.,American Museum of Natural History | Hadrys H.,ITZ | Hadrys H.,Yale University
Molecular Ecology | Year: 2010

Modern taxonomy requires an analytical approach incorporating all lines of evidence into decision-making. Such an approach can enhance both species identification and species discovery. The character-based DNA barcode method provides a molecular data set that can be incorporated into classical taxonomic data such that the discovery of new species can be made in an analytical framework that includes multiple sources of data. We here illustrate such a corroborative framework in a dragonfly model system that permits the discovery of two new, but visually cryptic species. In the African dragonfly genus Trithemis three distinct genetic clusters can be detected which could not be identified by using classical taxonomic characters. In order to test the hypothesis of two new species, DNA-barcodes from different sequence markers (ND1 and COI) were combined with morphological, ecological and biogeographic data sets. Phylogenetic analyses and incorporation of all data sets into a scheme called taxonomic circle highly supports the hypothesis of two new species. Our case study suggests an analytical approach to modern taxonomy that integrates data sets from different disciplines, thereby increasing the ease and reliability of both species discovery and species assignment. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Simon S.,ITZ | Schierwater B.,ITZ | Schierwater B.,American Museum of Natural History | Hadrys H.,ITZ | Hadrys H.,Yale University
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution | Year: 2010

Pterygota are traditionally divided in two lineages, the "Palaeoptera" and Neoptera. Despite several efforts neither morphology nor molecular systematics have resolved the phylogeny of the pterygote insects. Too few markers have yet been identified for adequately tracking mesozoic-aged divergences. We tested the Elongation factor-1α for its phylogenetic value in pterygote insect systematics. This highly conserved nuclear protein-coding gene has previously been reported to be useful in other groups for phylogenetic analyses at the intraordinal level as well as at the interordinal level. The analyses suggest that EF-1α DNA sequences as well as intron positions provide informative markers for pterygote phylogenetics. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Damm S.,ITZ | Hadrys H.,ITZ | Hadrys H.,American Museum of Natural History
Organisms Diversity and Evolution | Year: 2012

Water-dependent species inhabiting desert regions seem to be a contradiction in terms. Nevertheless, many species have evolved survival strategies for arid conditions. In Odonates (dragonflies and damselflies), both larvae and adults require very different and complex water-associated habitat conditions. The present study investigates the genetic diversity, population structure and dispersal patterns of a desert inhabiting odonate species, the Red-veined Dropwing dragonfly, Trithemis arteriosa. Eight populations from the arid Namibia and four population sites in the more tropical Kenya were compared by using nine microsatellite loci, one non-coding nuclear fragment and the mtDNA fragment ND1. Microsatellite analyses as well as the nuclear fragment reveal a high allelic diversity in all populations with almost no genetic sub-structuring. In contrast, ND1 sequence analyses show sub-structuring and-with two exceptions-only private haplotypes. The conflicting patterns of nuclear versus mitochondrial markers suggest a male-biased dispersal in this species. Results indicate that male dispersal is dependent on the environmental stability of the habitat, while females are philopatric. This life history adaptation would allow females to save energy for mating and oviposition in the demanding environment of a desert region. The results give direct insights into the dispersal pathways of a desert-inhabiting, strongly water dependent flying insect. © Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik 2012.


Simon S.,ITZ | Simon S.,American Museum of Natural History | Hadrys H.,ITZ | Hadrys H.,American Museum of Natural History
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution | Year: 2013

With respect to bauplan radiation, species and taxa richness, hexapods have an unassailable lead. But still, the phylogenetic relationships among the orders and infraorders remain a matter of discussion. The rapidly increasing mitochondrial genome sequences from diverse insect species provide the opportunity to explore miscellaneous evolutionary questions in the superclass Hexapoda. A combined primary sequence analyses of the complete available data set has not yet been performed. Until now phylogenetic analyses of subsets of selected taxa resulted to strong supported topologies showing in some instances discrepancies between morphological and nuclear data. This circumstance started the discussion about the limits of complete mitochondrial genomes for inferring deep hexapod relationships. By using the hitherto densest taxon sampling of Hexapoda our analyses resulted in discrepancies to the current phylogenetic hypotheses based on morphological and nuclear data, e.g. monophyly of hexapods and some hexapods orders, e.g. Diptera, Hemiptera and Orthoptera. Nonetheless, compared to previously published studies that strongly support systematically erroneous groups using a sparse taxon sampling, our analyses had no support for theses discrepancies. Consequently, we highly recommend interpreting mt-genome based phylogenies with incomplete representation of major orders/taxa particularly for hexapods with cautions although the inferred relationships are highly supported. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Damm S.,ITZ | Dijkstra K.-D.B.,National Museum of Natural History Naturalis | Hadrys H.,ITZ | Hadrys H.,Yale University
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution | Year: 2010

In the last few million years, tropical Africa has experienced pronounced climatic shifts with progressive aridification. Such changes must have had a great impact on freshwater biota, such as Odonata. With about forty species, Trithemis dominates dragonfly communities across Africa, from rain-pools to streams, deserts to rainforests, and lowlands to highlands. Red-bodied species tend to favor exposed, standing and often temporary waters, have strong dispersal capacities, and some of the largest geographic ranges in the genus. Those in cooler habitats, like forest streams, are generally dark-bodied and more sedentary. We combined molecular analyses of ND1, 16S, and ITS (ITSI, 5.8S, and ITSII) with morphological, ecological, and geographical data for 81% of known Trithemis species, including three Asian and two Madagascan endemics. Using molecular clock analyses, the genus's origin was estimated 6-9 Mya, with multiple lineages arising suddenly around 4 Mya. Open stagnant habitats were inferred to be ancestral and the rise of Trithemis may have coincided with savannah-expansion in the late Miocene. The adaptation of red species to more ephemeral conditions leads to large ranges and limited radiation within those lineages. By contrast, three clades of dark species radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene, each within distinct ecological confines: (1) lowland streams, (2) highland streams, and (3) swampy habitats on alternating sides of the Congo-Zambezi watershed divide; together giving rise to the majority of species diversity in the genus. During Trithemis evolution, multiple shifts from open to more forested habitats and from standing to running waters occurred. Allopatry by habitat fragmentation may be the dominant force in speciation, but possibly genetic divergence across habitat gradients was also involved. The study demonstrates the importance of combining ecological and phylogenetic data to understand the origin of biological diversity under great environmental change. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Schierwater B.,ITZ
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

For more than a century the origin of metazoan animals and for less than three years the early evolution of Hox genes has been debated. Both discussions are intrinsically tied together. New data from whole genome sequencing and recent progress in phylogeny of basal metazoans allow to provide an answer. The evolution of diploblastic animals (Placozoa, Porifera, Ctenophora and Cnidaria) and Bilateria (all higher animals) went parallel. The early split of these two lineages led to the evolution of a Hox system in Bilateria and the presence of Hox-like genes in Cnidaria and Placozoa. © 2010 Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media.

Loading ITZ collaborators
Loading ITZ collaborators