Sheffield, United Kingdom
Sheffield, United Kingdom
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-IA | Phase: FCH-03.2-2015 | Award Amount: 7.25M | Year: 2016

BIG HIT will create a replicable hydrogen territory in Orkney (Scotland) by implementing a fully integrated model of hydrogen production, storage, transportation and utilisation for heat, power and mobility. BIG HIT will absorb curtailed energy from two wind turbines and tidal turbines on the islands of Eday and Shapinsay, and use 1.5MW of PEM electrolysis to convert it into ~50 t pa of hydrogen. This will be used to heat two local schools, and transported by sea to Kirkwall in 5 hydrogen trailers, where it will be used to fuel a 75kW fuel cell (which will provide heat and power to the harbour buildings, a marina and 3 ferries when docked), and a refuelling station for a fleet of 10 fuel cell vehicles. The project employs a novel structure to manage the hydrogen trading, and dissemination that includes a follower territory and associations of over 1640 isolated territories.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-IA | Phase: FCH-03.1-2015 | Award Amount: 106.22M | Year: 2016

Hydrogen Mobility Europe 2 (H2ME 2) brings together action in 8 European countries to address the innovations required to make the hydrogen mobility sector truly ready for market. The project will perform a large-scale market test of hydrogen refuelling infrastructure, passenger and commercial fuel cell electric vehicles operated in real-world customer applications and demonstrate the system benefits generated by using electrolytic hydrogen solutions in grid operations. H2ME 2 will increase the participation of European manufacturers into the hydrogen sector, and demonstrate new vehicles across a range of platforms, with increased choice: new cars (Honda, and Daimler), new vans (range extended vehicles from Renault/Symbio and Renault/Nissan/Intelligent Energy) and a new medium sized urban delivery truck (Renault Trucks/Symbio). H2ME 2 develops an attractive proposition around range extended vehicles and supports a major roll-out of 1,000 of these vehicles to customers in France, Germany, Scandinavia and the UK. 1,230 new hydrogen fuelled vehicles will be deployed in total, trebling the existing fuel cell fleet in Europe. H2ME 2 will establish the conditions under which electrolytic refuelling stations can play a beneficial role in the energy system, and demonstrate the acquisition of real revenues from provision of energy services for aggregated electrolyser-HRS systems at a MW scale in both the UK and France. This has the further implication of demonstrating viable opportunities for reducing the cost of hydrogen at the nozzle by providing valuable energy services without disrupting refuelling operations. H2ME 2 will test 20 new HRS rigorously at high level of utilisation using the large vehicle deployment. The loading of stations by the end of the project is expected to average 20% of their daily fuelling capacity, with some stations exceeding 50% or more. This will test the HRS to a much greater extent than has been the case in previous projects.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-IA | Phase: FCH-01.7-2014 | Award Amount: 71.90M | Year: 2015

Hydrogen Mobility Europe (H2ME) brings together Europes 4 most ambitious national initiatives on hydrogen mobility (Germany, Scandinavia, France and the UK). The project will expand their developing networks of HRS and the fleets of fuel cell vehicles (FCEVs) operating on Europes roads, to significantly expand the activities in each country and start the creation of a pan-European hydrogen fuelling station network. In creating a project of this scale, the FCH JU will create not only a physical but also a strategic link between the regions that are leading in the deployment of hydrogen. The project will also include observer countries (Austria, Belgium and the Netherlands), who will use the learnings from this project to develop their own hydrogen mobility strategies. The project is the most ambitious coordinated hydrogen deployment project attempted in Europe. The scale of this deployment will allow the consortium to: Trial a large fleet of FCEVs in diverse applications across Europe - 200 OEM FCEVs (Daimler and Hyundai) and 125 fuel cell range-extended vans (Symbio FCell collaborating with Renault) will be deployed Deploy 29 state of the art refuelling stations, using technology from the full breadth of Europes hydrogen refuelling station providers. The scale will ensure that stations will be lower cost than in previous projects and the breadth will ensure that Europes hydrogen station developers advance together Conduct a real world test of 4 national hydrogen mobility strategies and share learnings to support other countries strategy development Analyse the customer attitude to the FCEV proposition, with a focus on attitudes to the fuelling station networks as they evolve in each country Assess the performance of the refuelling stations and vehicles in order to provide data of a sufficient resolution to allow policy-makers, early adopters and the hydrogen mobility industry to validate the readiness of the technology for full commercial roll-out.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMBP-03-2016 | Award Amount: 4.48M | Year: 2017

CREATE aims at developing innovative membrane electrode assemblies for low-temperature polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (FC) and electrolyzer (EL) with much reduced cost. This will be achieved via elimination or drastic reduction of critical raw materials in their catalysts, in particular platinum group metals (PGM). Key issues with present low-temperature FC & EL are the high contents of PGM in devices based on proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) and the need for liquid electrolytes in alkaline FC and EL. To overcome this, we will shift from PEM-based cells to 1) pure anion-conducting polymer-electrolytes and 2) to bipolar-membrane polymer electrolytes. The latter comprises anion and proton conducting ionomers and a junction. Bipolar membranes allow adapting the pH at each electrode, thereby opening the door to improved performance or PGM-free catalysts. Both strategies carry the potentiality to eliminate or drastically reduce the need for PGM while maintaining the advantages of PEM-based devices. In strategy 1, novel anion-exchange ionomers and membranes will be developed and interfaced with catalysts based on Earth-abundant metal oxides or metal-carbon composites for the oxygen reactions, and with ultralow PGM or PGM-free catalysts for the hydrogen reactions. In strategy 2, novel bipolar membrane designs, or designs unexplored for FC & EL, will be developed and interfaced with catalysts for the oxygen reactions (high pH side of the bipolar membrane) and with catalysts for the hydrogen reactions (low pH side). The ionomers and oxygen reaction catalysts developed in strategy 1 will be equally useful for strategy 2, while identified PGM-free and ultralow-PGM catalysts will be implemented for the hydrogen reactions on the acidic side. Polymer-electrolyte FC & EL based on those concepts will be evaluated for targeted applications, i.e. photovoltaic electricity storage, off-grid back-up power and H2 production. The targeted market is distributed small-scale systems.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-02.1-2015 | Award Amount: 2.32M | Year: 2016

Hydrogen production by PEM water electrolysers (PEMWE) has the potential of becoming a key enabling technology in the deployment of FCH technologies in the future energy market as an energy storage system able to deliver hydrogen to different applications and enabling a high penetration of renewable energy sources (RES). PEMWE has showed capabilities in the emerging hydrogen scenarios to be a valid alternative to previously developed technologies, especially considering the dynamic and versatile operation expected of hydrogen production methods when integrated with RES. Despite the advances and improvements experienced to date with these systems, the technology needs to be further improved if it is to be installed as a competitive solution for energy markets and even more so in the case of off-grid configurations due to their particularities. The development of an autonomous off-grid electrolysers as an energy storage or backup solution (e.g. replacing diesel engines) is an unusual and challenging goal because it needs to have the capability of being directly coupled to RES in locations where the electricity grid is not deployed or weak. The main goal of the ELY4OFF proposal is the development and demonstration of an autonomous off-grid electrolysis system linked to renewable energy sources, including the essential overarching communication and control system for optimising the overall efficiency when integrated in a real installation


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-01.6-2014 | Award Amount: 2.47M | Year: 2015

The overall aim of NewBusFuel is to resolve a significant knowledge gap around the technologies and engineering solutions required for the refuelling of a large number of buses at a single bus depot. Bus depot scale refuelling imposes significant new challenges which have not yet been tackled by the hydrogen refuelling sector: Scale throughputs in excess of 2,000kg/day (compared to 100kg/day for current passenger car stations) Ultra-high reliability to ensure close to 100% available supply for the public transport networks which will rely on hydrogen Short refuelling window buses need to be refuelled in a short overnight window, leading to rapid H2 throughput Footprint needs to be reduced to fit within busy urban bus depots Volume of hydrogen storage which can exceed 10 tonnes per depot and leads to new regulatory and safety constraints A large and pan-European consortium will develop solutions to these challenges. The consortium involves 10 of Europes leading hydrogen station providers. These partners will work with 12 bus operators in Europe, each of whom have demonstrated political support for the deployment of hydrogen bus fleets. In each location engineering studies will be produced, by collaborative design teams involving bus operators and industrial HRS experts, each defining the optimal design, hydrogen supply route, commercial arrangements and the practicalities for a hydrogen station capable of providing fuel to a fleet of fuel cell buses (75-260 buses). Public reports will be prepared based on an analysis across the studies, with an aim to provide design guidelines to bus operators considering deploying hydrogen buses, as well as to demonstrate the range of depot fuelling solutions which exist (and their economics) to a wider audience. These results will be disseminated widely to provide confidence to the whole bus sector that this potential barrier to commercialisation of hydrogen bus technology has been overcome.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-02-1-2016 | Award Amount: 2.81M | Year: 2017

The overall objective of the QualyGridS project is the establishing of standardized tests for electrolysers performing electrical grid services. Alkaline electrolysers as well as PEM electrolysers will be considered individually in performance analysis and in an assessment of business cases for these electrolysers use. A variety of different grid services will be addressed as well as multiple hydrogen end users. The protocols developed will be applied to alkaline and PEM electrolysers systems, respectively, using electrolyser sizes from 50 kW up to 300 kW. Additionally, a techno-economic analysis of business cases will be performed covering the grid and market situations in the most relevant regions of Europe. The consortium adressing these tasks includes three electrolyser manufacturers and well as research institutions with plenty of experience. Inclusion of a European standardisation institution will allow for maximum impact of the protocols. An advisory committee including TSOs from several countries and a key player in US electrolysis research will support the project with valuable advice. Experience from previous FCH-JU electrolyser projects and national projects is available to the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2013.1.1 | Award Amount: 38.45M | Year: 2014

HyFIVE is an ambitious European project including 15 partners who will deploy 110 fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) from the five global automotive companies who are leading in their commercialisation (BMW, Daimler, HONDA, Hyundai and Toyota). Refuelling stations configured in viable networks will be developed in three distinct clusters by deploying 6 new stations linked with 12 existing stations supplied by Air Products, Copenhagen Hydrogen Network, Danish Hydrogen Fuel, ITM Power, Linde and OMV. The projects scale and pan-European breadth allow it to tackle all of the final technical and social issues which could prevent the commercial roll-out of hydrogen vehicle and refuelling infrastructure across Europe. Research tasks will ensure these issues are analysed and that the learning is available for the hydrogen community across Europe. Issues include: Demonstrating that the vehicles meet and exceed the technical and environmental expectations for FCEVs Establishing best practice on supporting FCEVs in the field, including new procedures for equipping maintenance facilities, training dealers, establishing a spare parts regime etc. Using the stations in the project to understand progress on solutions to the outstanding technical issues facing HRS Investigating the challenges of using electrolysers to generate renewable hydrogen Understanding the impact of operating a network for filling stations operated by different suppliers, with different hydrogen supply modes Understanding the buying characteristics of the earliest adopters, who will procure vehicles despite high costs and limited infrastructure Providing evidence on the likely trajectory of the commercialisation of FCEVs in Europe The project will disseminate the results of this demonstration to opinion formers and decision makers across Europe to improve public readiness for the technology and encourage supportive policies and investment decisions.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 529.28K | Year: 2016

With the roll out of Hydrogen Refuelling Stations (HRS) and Power-to-Gas (P2G) systems the requirements for electrolyser production is set to grow rapidly from 2015 onwards. The UK has a leading position in rapid response PEM electrolysis and whilst it has been, and is possible to fulfil current demand using existing manual production processes the requirements to scale up production capacity is pressing, as is the need to reduce lifetime system costs in order to broaden demand. This project seeks to address the technical challenges associated with production scale up and low cost manufacturing of PEM MEAs for electrolysers, in order to meet future demand. This will be achieved by working closely with key supply chain partners bringing expertise from a range of industries to tackle an area of stack production which offers greatest cost reduction opportunities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-02.2-2015 | Award Amount: 2.65M | Year: 2016

The next generation water electrolysers must achieve better dynamic behaviour (rapid start-up, fast response, wider load and temperature ranges) to provide superior grid-balancing services and thus address the steep increase of intermittent renewables interfaced to the grid. The HPEM2GAS project will develop a low cost PEM electrolyser optimised for grid management through both stack and balance of plant innovations, culminating in a six month field test of an advanced 180 (nominal)-300 kW (transient) PEM electrolyser. The electrolyser developed will implement an advanced BoP (power tracking electronics, high efficiency AC/DC converters, high temperature ion exchange cartridges, advanced safety integrated system, new control logic) and improved stack design and components (injection moulded components, flow-field free bipolar plates, Aquivion membranes, core-shell/solid solution electrocatalysts). Several strategies are applied to lower the overall cost, thus enabling widespread utilisation of the technology. These primarily concern a three-fold increase in current density (resulting in the proportional decrease in capital costs) whilst maintaining cutting edge efficiency, a material use minimisation approach in terms of reduced membrane thickness whilst keeping the gas cross-over low, and reducing the precious metal loading. Further, improving the stack lifetime to 10 years and a reduction of the system complexity without compromising safety or operability. All these solutions contribute significantly to reducing the electrolyser CAPEX and OPEX costs. HPEM2GAS develops key technologies from TRL4 to TRL6, demonstrating them in a 180-300 kW PEM electrolyser system in a power-to-gas field test; delivers a techno-economic analysis and an exploitation plan to bring the innovations to market. The consortium comprises a system integrator, suppliers of membranes, catalysts and MEAs, a stack developer, an independent expert on standardization and an end-user.

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