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Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

Vassileva M.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Nascetti A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Giuliotonolo F.,ITHACA | Boccardo P.,Polytechnic University of Turin
International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) | Year: 2015

The present paper is focused on a potential method for unsupervised flood extent classification approach based, on the extraction of radar shadows from SAR simulated image, generated by means of image metadata and an available DSM covering the area of interest. The SAR simulation process is carried out using the SAR Simulator tool, implemented in the free and open SAR PlugIn developed for the Opticks platform. Different tests have been performed using SGF RADARSAT-2 imagery in order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed approach. © 2015 IEEE. Source


Boccardo P.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tonolo F.G.,ITHACA
International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences - ISPRS Archives | Year: 2012

Haiti was hit by a devastating earthquake on 12 January 2010. The immediate response to the disaster was a real turning point concerning the availability, dissemination and licensing of a huge quantity of geospatial data. Timely triggering of the Earth Observation satellites, and absence of cloud cover, allowed to acquire very high-resolution optical satellite imagery (spatial resolution up to 0.5m) over the main affected areas within a few hours of the disaster, while the whole country coverage was completed in a very short time span. Furthermore in the following days aerial imagery, high resolution SAR radar imagery as well as thermal and LiDAR data were widely acquired. The paper will show how well established remote sensing techniques allowed to carry out earthquake damage assessment in a very short time, exploiting the synergic capabilities of geospatial tools and instruments such as EO satellites, Web mapping, GIS software and volunteer mapping. In a few days several map products based on the aforementioned analysis were delivered to end users: a review of the different types and purposes of this products will be provided and discussed. An assessment of the thematic accuracy of remotely sensed based products will be carried out on the basis of a review of the several available studies focused on this issue, including the main outcomes of a validation based on a comparison with in-situ data performed by the authors. © 2012 ISPRS. Source


Ajmar A.,ITHACA | Boccardo P.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tonolo F.G.,ITHACA
Italian Journal of Remote Sensing / Rivista Italiana di Telerilevamento | Year: 2011

Haiti was hit by a devastating earthquake on 12 January 2010. Timely triggering of the Earth Observation satellites, and absence of cloud cover, allowed to acquire very high-resolution satellite imagery over the main affected areas within a few hours of the disaster. ITHACA performed a first damage assessment based on remotely sensed data, to support the emergency response activities carried out by the humanitarian agencies. This paper aims to highlight not only the adopted methodology and the main cartographic outputs, but also the operational procedures required to make well known analysis techniques effective in an application context. Source


Balbo S.,ITHACA | Boccardo P.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Dalmasso S.,ITHACA | Pasquali P.,ITHACA
International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences - ISPRS Archives | Year: 2013

Several studies have been conducted in Africa to assist local governments in addressing the risk situation related to natural hazards. Geospatial data containing information on vulnerability, impacts, climate change, disaster risk reduction is usually part of the output of such studies and is valuable to national and international organizations to reduce the risks and mitigate the impacts of disasters. Nevertheless this data isn't efficiently widely distributed and often resides in remote storage solutions hardly reachable. Spatial Data Infrastructures are technical solutions capable to solve this issue, by storing geospatial data and making them widely available through the internet. Among these solutions, GeoNode, an open source online platform for geospatial data sharing, has been developed in recent years. GeoNode is a platform for the management and publication of geospatial data. It brings together mature and stable open-source software projects under a consistent and easy-to-use interface allowing users, with little training, to quickly and easily share data and create interactive maps. GeoNode data management tools allow for integrated creation of data, metadata, and map visualizations. Each dataset in the system can be shared publicly or restricted to allow access to only specific users. Social features like user profiles and commenting and rating systems allow for the development of communities around each platform to facilitate the use, management, and quality control of the data the GeoNode instance contains (geonode.org). This paper presents a case study scenario of setting up a Web platform based on GeoNode. It is a public platform called MASDAP and promoted by the Government of Malawi in order to support development of the country and build resilience against natural disasters. A substantial amount of geospatial data has already been collected about hydrogeological risk, as well as several other-disasters related information. Moreover this platform will help to ensure that the data created by a number of past or ongoing projects is maintained and that this information remains accessible and useful. An Integrated Flood Risk Management Plan for a river basin has already been included in the platform and other data from future disaster risk management projects will be added as well. Source


Ajmar A.,ITHACA | Balbo S.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Boccardo P.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Giulio Tonolo F.,ITHACA | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Digital Earth | Year: 2013

Among the major natural disasters that occurred in 2010, the Haiti earthquake was a real turning point concerning the availability, dissemination and licensing of a huge quantity of geospatial data. In a few days several map products based on the analysis of remotely sensed data-sets were delivered to users. This demonstrated the need for reliable methods to validate the increasing variety of open source data and remote sensing-derived products for crisis management, with the aim to correctly spatially reference and interconnect these data with other global digital archives. As far as building damage assessment is concerned, the need for accurate field data to overcome the limitations of both vertical and oblique view satellite and aerial images was evident. To cope with the aforementioned need, a newly developed Low-Cost Mobile Mapping System (LCMMS) was deployed in Port-au-Prince (Haiti) and tested during a five-day survey in February-March 2010. The system allows for acquisition of movies and single georeferenced frames by means of a transportable device easily installable (or adaptable) to every type of vehicle. It is composed of four webcams with a total field of view of about 180 degrees and one Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, with the main aim to rapidly cover large areas for effective usage in emergency situations. The main technical features of the LCMMS, the operational use in the field (and related issues) and a potential approach to be adopted for the validation of satellite/aerial building damage assessments are thoroughly described in the article. © 2011 Taylor & Francis. Source

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